Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys (BAS survey)
Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys (BAS survey)

Topic
Education and Learning
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Uses of Technology
Relevance for this Topic
Country Belgium
URL
www.belgianageingstudies.be
www.belgianageingstudies.be
www.belgianageingstudies.be
www.belgianageingstudies.be
www.belgianageingstudies.be
www.belgianageingstudies.be
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences; Department of Educational Sciences & Faculty of Education, Health and Social Work; Vakgroep Sociale Wetenschappen
Vrije Universiteit Leuven & Hogeschool Gent
Pleinlaan 2 & Campus Schoonmeersen; Voskenslaan 362
1050 & 9000 Brussels & Gent
Belgium
Phone: +32 2 629 25 31
Email: liesbeth.de.donder(at)vub.ac.be & nico.dewitte(at)hogent.be
Url: www.belgianageingstudies.be

Timeliness, transparency

Data is available about six months following collection.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, occasional


Longitudinal survey for some communities only

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Volunteers associated with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team are allowed to clarify the meaning of questions when this is requested.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, occasional


Longitudinal survey for some communities only

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Volunteers associated with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team are allowed to clarify the meaning of questions when this is requested.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, occasional


Longitudinal survey for some communities only

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Volunteers associated with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team are allowed to clarify the meaning of questions when this is requested.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, occasional


Longitudinal survey for some communities only

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Volunteers associated with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team are allowed to clarify the meaning of questions when this is requested.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, occasional


Longitudinal survey for some communities only

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Volunteers associated with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team are allowed to clarify the meaning of questions when this is requested.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, occasional


Longitudinal survey for some communities only

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Volunteers associated with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team are allowed to clarify the meaning of questions when this is requested.


Access to data


The data are available for academic and policy research.

Conditions of access


Researchers interested in the dataset or the questionnaire have to contact Liesbeth De Donder or Nico De Witte. The regular procedure is that after some contacts and consultations, a selection of variables is made, which is sent to the partner. Publications are always in joint consultation and cooperation with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team.


The data can be received very fast.


Anonymised microdata


Excel, SAS


The questionnaire is available in Dutch, French, English, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and Arabic.

Access to data


The data are available for academic and policy research.

Conditions of access


Researchers interested in the dataset or the questionnaire have to contact Liesbeth De Donder or Nico De Witte. The regular procedure is that after some contacts and consultations, a selection of variables is made, which is sent to the partner. Publications are always in joint consultation and cooperation with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team.


The data can be received very fast.


Anonymised microdata


Excel, SAS


The questionnaire is available in Dutch, French, English, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and Arabic.

Access to data


The data are available for academic and policy research.

Conditions of access


Researchers interested in the dataset or the questionnaire have to contact Liesbeth De Donder or Nico De Witte. The regular procedure is that after some contacts and consultations, a selection of variables is made, which is sent to the partner. Publications are always in joint consultation and cooperation with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team.


The data can be received very fast.


Anonymised microdata


Excel, SAS


The questionnaire is available in Dutch, French, English, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and Arabic.

Access to data


The data are available for academic and policy research.

Conditions of access


Researchers interested in the dataset or the questionnaire have to contact Liesbeth De Donder or Nico De Witte. The regular procedure is that after some contacts and consultations, a selection of variables is made, which is sent to the partner. Publications are always in joint consultation and cooperation with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team.


The data can be received very fast.


Anonymised microdata


Excel, SAS


The questionnaire is available in Dutch, French, English, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and Arabic.

Access to data


The data are available for academic and policy research.

Conditions of access


Researchers interested in the dataset or the questionnaire have to contact Liesbeth De Donder or Nico De Witte. The regular procedure is that after some contacts and consultations, a selection of variables is made, which is sent to the partner. Publications are always in joint consultation and cooperation with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team.


The data can be received very fast.


Anonymised microdata


Excel, SAS


The questionnaire is available in Dutch, French, English, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and Arabic.

Access to data


The data are available for academic and policy research.

Conditions of access


Researchers interested in the dataset or the questionnaire have to contact Liesbeth De Donder or Nico De Witte. The regular procedure is that after some contacts and consultations, a selection of variables is made, which is sent to the partner. Publications are always in joint consultation and cooperation with the Belgian Ageing Studies research team.


The data can be received very fast.


Anonymised microdata


Excel, SAS


The questionnaire is available in Dutch, French, English, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and Arabic.


Coverage


Years of collection: 2002-present. Sample sizes depend on the communities in question: they vary between 182 and 1,592.


2002


Stratified by gender and age (60 to 69; 70 to 79; 80 years and over)


Population registers of the different communities


Communities in the Flemish region; Two pilot studies are going on in the Walloon region.


60 years and older


Representative of the communities that take part


The Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys can be used to study education and learning (what do we know about the extent and nature of older people’s learning), social, civic and cultural engagement (e.g. What do we know about older people’s participation in society in formal and informal roles?) and uses of technology. The data are also useful to study health and performance, and housing, urban development and mobility (e.g. What kinds of community environment are best at fostering wellbeing among older people?).


Several publications exist using the Belgian Ageing Studies data, relating to various research topics of interest to the JPI project. On health and performance: • De Witte, N., Buffel, T., De Donder, L., et al. "Care shortages in later life: The role of individual and contextual variables in Belgium". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 111-118. On housing, urban development and mobility • Buffel, T. & Phillipson, C. "Experiences of place among older migrants living in inner-city neighbourhoods in Belgium and England". Diversite Urbaine, 11 (2011): 13-37. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Experiences of neighbourhood exclusion and inclusion among older people living in deprived inner-city areas in Belgium and England". Ageing & Society 33(1) (2012): 89-110. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Ageing in urban environments: Developing age-friendly cities. Critical Social Policy" 32(4) (2012): 597–617. On social, civic and cultural engagement • Dury, S., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Recruiting older volunteers: Findings from the Belgian Ageing Studies". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 1-8. • Vonck, E., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Older people and sport: Looking beyond the health perspective". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 9-16.

Coverage


Years of collection: 2002-present. Sample sizes depend on the communities in question: they vary between 182 and 1,592.


2002


Stratified by gender and age (60 to 69; 70 to 79; 80 years and over)


Population registers of the different communities


Communities in the Flemish region; Two pilot studies are going on in the Walloon region.


60 years and older


Representative of the communities that take part


The Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys can be used to study education and learning (what do we know about the extent and nature of older people’s learning), social, civic and cultural engagement (e.g. What do we know about older people’s participation in society in formal and informal roles?) and uses of technology. The data are also useful to study health and performance, and housing, urban development and mobility (e.g. What kinds of community environment are best at fostering wellbeing among older people?).


Several publications exist using the Belgian Ageing Studies data, relating to various research topics of interest to the JPI project. On health and performance: • De Witte, N., Buffel, T., De Donder, L., et al. "Care shortages in later life: The role of individual and contextual variables in Belgium". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 111-118. On housing, urban development and mobility • Buffel, T. & Phillipson, C. "Experiences of place among older migrants living in inner-city neighbourhoods in Belgium and England". Diversite Urbaine, 11 (2011): 13-37. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Experiences of neighbourhood exclusion and inclusion among older people living in deprived inner-city areas in Belgium and England". Ageing & Society 33(1) (2012): 89-110. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Ageing in urban environments: Developing age-friendly cities. Critical Social Policy" 32(4) (2012): 597–617. On social, civic and cultural engagement • Dury, S., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Recruiting older volunteers: Findings from the Belgian Ageing Studies". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 1-8. • Vonck, E., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Older people and sport: Looking beyond the health perspective". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 9-16.

Coverage


Years of collection: 2002-present. Sample sizes depend on the communities in question: they vary between 182 and 1,592.


2002


Stratified by gender and age (60 to 69; 70 to 79; 80 years and over)


Population registers of the different communities


Communities in the Flemish region; Two pilot studies are going on in the Walloon region.


60 years and older


Representative of the communities that take part


The Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys can be used to study education and learning (what do we know about the extent and nature of older people’s learning), social, civic and cultural engagement (e.g. What do we know about older people’s participation in society in formal and informal roles?) and uses of technology. The data are also useful to study health and performance, and housing, urban development and mobility (e.g. What kinds of community environment are best at fostering wellbeing among older people?).


Several publications exist using the Belgian Ageing Studies data, relating to various research topics of interest to the JPI project. On health and performance: • De Witte, N., Buffel, T., De Donder, L., et al. "Care shortages in later life: The role of individual and contextual variables in Belgium". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 111-118. On housing, urban development and mobility • Buffel, T. & Phillipson, C. "Experiences of place among older migrants living in inner-city neighbourhoods in Belgium and England". Diversite Urbaine, 11 (2011): 13-37. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Experiences of neighbourhood exclusion and inclusion among older people living in deprived inner-city areas in Belgium and England". Ageing & Society 33(1) (2012): 89-110. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Ageing in urban environments: Developing age-friendly cities. Critical Social Policy" 32(4) (2012): 597–617. On social, civic and cultural engagement • Dury, S., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Recruiting older volunteers: Findings from the Belgian Ageing Studies". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 1-8. • Vonck, E., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Older people and sport: Looking beyond the health perspective". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 9-16.

Coverage


Years of collection: 2002-present. Sample sizes depend on the communities in question: they vary between 182 and 1,592.


2002


Stratified by gender and age (60 to 69; 70 to 79; 80 years and over)


Population registers of the different communities


Communities in the Flemish region; Two pilot studies are going on in the Walloon region.


60 years and older


Representative of the communities that take part


The Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys can be used to study education and learning (what do we know about the extent and nature of older people’s learning), social, civic and cultural engagement (e.g. What do we know about older people’s participation in society in formal and informal roles?) and uses of technology. The data are also useful to study health and performance, and housing, urban development and mobility (e.g. What kinds of community environment are best at fostering wellbeing among older people?).


Several publications exist using the Belgian Ageing Studies data, relating to various research topics of interest to the JPI project. On health and performance: • De Witte, N., Buffel, T., De Donder, L., et al. "Care shortages in later life: The role of individual and contextual variables in Belgium". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 111-118. On housing, urban development and mobility • Buffel, T. & Phillipson, C. "Experiences of place among older migrants living in inner-city neighbourhoods in Belgium and England". Diversite Urbaine, 11 (2011): 13-37. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Experiences of neighbourhood exclusion and inclusion among older people living in deprived inner-city areas in Belgium and England". Ageing & Society 33(1) (2012): 89-110. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Ageing in urban environments: Developing age-friendly cities. Critical Social Policy" 32(4) (2012): 597–617. On social, civic and cultural engagement • Dury, S., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Recruiting older volunteers: Findings from the Belgian Ageing Studies". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 1-8. • Vonck, E., Verté, D., De Donder, et al. "Older people and sport: Looking beyond the health perspective". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 9-16.

Coverage


Years of collection: 2002-present. Sample sizes depend on the communities in question: they vary between 182 and 1,592.


2002


Stratified by gender and age (60 to 69; 70 to 79; 80 years and over)


Population registers of the different communities


Communities in the Flemish region; Two pilot studies are going on in the Walloon region.


60 years and older


Representative of the communities that take part


The Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys can be used to study education and learning (what do we know about the extent and nature of older people’s learning), social, civic and cultural engagement (e.g. What do we know about older people’s participation in society in formal and informal roles?) and uses of technology. The data are also useful to study health and performance, and housing, urban development and mobility (e.g. What kinds of community environment are best at fostering wellbeing among older people?).


Several publications exist using the Belgian Ageing Studies data, relating to various research topics of interest to the JPI project. On health and performance: • De Witte, N., Buffel, T., De Donder, L., et al. "Care shortages in later life: The role of individual and contextual variables in Belgium". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 111-118. On housing, urban development and mobility • Buffel, T. & Phillipson, C. "Experiences of place among older migrants living in inner-city neighbourhoods in Belgium and England". Diversite Urbaine, 11 (2011): 13-37. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Experiences of neighbourhood exclusion and inclusion among older people living in deprived inner-city areas in Belgium and England". Ageing & Society 33(1) (2012): 89-110. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Ageing in urban environments: Developing age-friendly cities. Critical Social Policy" 32(4) (2012): 597–617. On social, civic and cultural engagement • Dury, S., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Recruiting older volunteers: Findings from the Belgian Ageing Studies". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 1-8. • Vonck, E., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Older people and sport: Looking beyond the health perspective". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 9-16.

Coverage


Years of collection: 2002-present. Sample sizes depend on the communities in question: they vary between 182 and 1,592.


2002


Stratified by gender and age (60 to 69; 70 to 79; 80 years and over)


Population registers of the different communities


Communities in the Flemish region; Two pilot studies are going on in the Walloon region.


60 years and older


Representative of the communities that take part


The Belgian Ageing Studies Surveys can be used to study education and learning (what do we know about the extent and nature of older people’s learning), social, civic and cultural engagement (e.g. What do we know about older people’s participation in society in formal and informal roles?) and uses of technology. The data are also useful to study health and performance, and housing, urban development and mobility (e.g. What kinds of community environment are best at fostering wellbeing among older people?).


Several publications exist using the Belgian Ageing Studies data, relating to various research topics of interest to the JPI project. On health and performance: • De Witte, N., Buffel, T., De Donder, L., et al. "Care shortages in later life: The role of individual and contextual variables in Belgium". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 111-118. On housing, urban development and mobility • Buffel, T. & Phillipson, C. "Experiences of place among older migrants living in inner-city neighbourhoods in Belgium and England". Diversite Urbaine, 11 (2011): 13-37. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Experiences of neighbourhood exclusion and inclusion among older people living in deprived inner-city areas in Belgium and England". Ageing & Society 33(1) (2012): 89-110. • Buffel, T., Phillipson, C. & Scharf, T. "Ageing in urban environments: Developing age-friendly cities. Critical Social Policy" 32(4) (2012): 597–617. On social, civic and cultural engagement • Dury, S., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Recruiting older volunteers: Findings from the Belgian Ageing Studies". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 1-8. • Vonck, E., Verté, D., De Donder, L., et al. "Older people and sport: Looking beyond the health perspective". International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies 2 (2010): 9-16.


Linkage


Where possible, internationally validated scales were used (e.g. De Jong Gierveld scale on happiness, MOS scale on health, GHQ scale on psychological wellbeing, etc.).


The samples cannot be linked to other databases.

Linkage


Where possible, internationally validated scales were used (e.g. De Jong Gierveld scale on happiness, MOS scale on health, GHQ scale on psychological wellbeing, etc.).


The samples cannot be linked to other databases.

Linkage


Where possible, internationally validated scales were used (e.g. De Jong Gierveld scale on happiness, MOS scale on health, GHQ scale on psychological wellbeing, etc.).


The samples cannot be linked to other databases.

Linkage


Where possible, internationally validated scales were used (e.g. De Jong Gierveld scale on happiness, MOS scale on health, GHQ scale on psychological wellbeing, etc.).


The samples cannot be linked to other databases.

Linkage


Where possible, internationally validated scales were used (e.g. De Jong Gierveld scale on happiness, MOS scale on health, GHQ scale on psychological wellbeing, etc.).


The samples cannot be linked to other databases.

Linkage


Where possible, internationally validated scales were used (e.g. De Jong Gierveld scale on happiness, MOS scale on health, GHQ scale on psychological wellbeing, etc.).


The samples cannot be linked to other databases.


Data quality


General information on data quality of the Belgian Ageing Studies surveys: Data quality is difficult to assess as no detailed methodological information is available. Undetailed information is given on the BAS website: www.belgianageingstudies.be.

Data quality


General information on data quality of the Belgian Ageing Studies surveys: Data quality is difficult to assess as no detailed methodological information is available. Undetailed information is given on the BAS website: www.belgianageingstudies.be.

Data quality


General information on data quality of the Belgian Ageing Studies surveys: Data quality is difficult to assess as no detailed methodological information is available. Undetailed information is given on the BAS website: www.belgianageingstudies.be.

Data quality


General information on data quality of the Belgian Ageing Studies surveys: Data quality is difficult to assess as no detailed methodological information is available. Undetailed information is given on the BAS website: www.belgianageingstudies.be.

Data quality


General information on data quality of the Belgian Ageing Studies surveys: Data quality is difficult to assess as no detailed methodological information is available. Undetailed information is given on the BAS website: www.belgianageingstudies.be.

Data quality


General information on data quality of the Belgian Ageing Studies surveys: Data quality is difficult to assess as no detailed methodological information is available. Undetailed information is given on the BAS website: www.belgianageingstudies.be.


Applicability


Strengths: The researchers organising the survey point to the advantages of their peer research design, i.e. the involvement of older adults in the study, not only as the research target group, but also as experts and actors involved in the study. According to the researchers, this system has the advantages of face-to-face-research (i.e. higher response rate), while minimising the disadvantages of such research (i.e. social desirability). Furthermore, peer-research would enrich the research design and would result in more complete questionnaires and a high response rate. Weaknesses: Four important weaknesses can be distinguished: (1) Very little information is available on methodology, making data quality difficult to assess; (2) The data have only been collected in the Flemish Region; (3) They are only representative at the municipality level; and, (4) They exclude the institutionalized elderly.

Applicability


Strengths: The researchers organising the survey point to the advantages of their peer research design, i.e. the involvement of older adults in the study, not only as the research target group, but also as experts and actors involved in the study. According to the researchers, this system has the advantages of face-to-face-research (i.e. higher response rate), while minimising the disadvantages of such research (i.e. social desirability). Furthermore, peer-research would enrich the research design and would result in more complete questionnaires and a high response rate. Weaknesses: Four important weaknesses can be distinguished: (1) Very little information is available on methodology, making data quality difficult to assess; (2) The data have only been collected in the Flemish Region; (3) They are only representative at the municipality level; and, (4) They exclude the institutionalized elderly.

Applicability


Strengths: The researchers organising the survey point to the advantages of their peer research design, i.e. the involvement of older adults in the study, not only as the research target group, but also as experts and actors involved in the study. According to the researchers, this system has the advantages of face-to-face-research (i.e. higher response rate), while minimising the disadvantages of such research (i.e. social desirability). Furthermore, peer-research would enrich the research design and would result in more complete questionnaires and a high response rate. Weaknesses: Four important weaknesses can be distinguished: (1) Very little information is available on methodology, making data quality difficult to assess; (2) The data have only been collected in the Flemish Region; (3) They are only representative at the municipality level; and, (4) They exclude the institutionalized elderly.

Applicability


Strengths: The researchers organising the survey point to the advantages of their peer research design, i.e. the involvement of older adults in the study, not only as the research target group, but also as experts and actors involved in the study. According to the researchers, this system has the advantages of face-to-face-research (i.e. higher response rate), while minimising the disadvantages of such research (i.e. social desirability). Furthermore, peer-research would enrich the research design and would result in more complete questionnaires and a high response rate. Weaknesses: Four important weaknesses can be distinguished: (1) Very little information is available on methodology, making data quality difficult to assess; (2) The data have only been collected in the Flemish Region; (3) They are only representative at the municipality level; and, (4) They exclude the institutionalized elderly.

Applicability


Strengths: The researchers organising the survey point to the advantages of their peer research design, i.e. the involvement of older adults in the study, not only as the research target group, but also as experts and actors involved in the study. According to the researchers, this system has the advantages of face-to-face-research (i.e. higher response rate), while minimising the disadvantages of such research (i.e. social desirability). Furthermore, peer-research would enrich the research design and would result in more complete questionnaires and a high response rate. Weaknesses: Four important weaknesses can be distinguished: (1) Very little information is available on methodology, making data quality difficult to assess; (2) The data have only been collected in the Flemish Region; (3) They are only representative at the municipality level; and, (4) They exclude the institutionalized elderly.

Applicability


Strengths: The researchers organising the survey point to the advantages of their peer research design, i.e. the involvement of older adults in the study, not only as the research target group, but also as experts and actors involved in the study. According to the researchers, this system has the advantages of face-to-face-research (i.e. higher response rate), while minimising the disadvantages of such research (i.e. social desirability). Furthermore, peer-research would enrich the research design and would result in more complete questionnaires and a high response rate. Weaknesses: Four important weaknesses can be distinguished: (1) Very little information is available on methodology, making data quality difficult to assess; (2) The data have only been collected in the Flemish Region; (3) They are only representative at the municipality level; and, (4) They exclude the institutionalized elderly.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Hans Peeters
  • (see Partners)