Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP)
Sozio-oekonomisches Panel (SOEP)

Topic
Wellbeing
Social Systems and Welfare
Work and Productivity
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Intergenerational Relationships
Relevance for this Topic
Country Germany
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Michaela Engelmann
Das Sozio-oekonomische Panel, DIW Berlin
Mohrenstraße 58
10117 Berlin
Germany
Phone: +49 30 89789-292
Fax: +49 30 89789-109
Email: soepmail(at)diw.de
Url: http://www.diw.de/en/diw_02.c.222517.en/data.html

Timeliness, transparency

Data are usually collected from February to September and released in the late summer of the following year.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


CAPI since 1998

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


CAPI since 1998

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


Access to data


On site access, downloadable files, DVD/CD after agreement, open access, data available only for scientific community, etc. In accordance with the data protection law, the individual SOEP data sets cannot be downloaded directly from the homepage. Moreover, the data are also subject to regulations limiting their use to scientific purposes. A DVD will be sent via certified mail for a price of 30€ + 8€ forwarding expenses.

Conditions of access


Data access must comply with high security standards for maintaining confidentiality and protecting personal privacy. Following the conclusion of a data distribution contract with DIW Berlin, contract holders receive the SOEP dataset on DVD by insured mail (38€).


around 14 days


anonymised microdata


The microdata from the Socio-Economic Panel are available in CSV, SAS, SPSS, and STATA format. Due to the large volume of data, they can only be analysed effectively using statistical software (SPSS; Stata; R; SAS and others).


Data and documentation are available in German and English (variables, Value Labels, Questionnaires, Documentation, etc.).

Access to data


On site access, downloadable files, DVD/CD after agreement, open access, data available only for scientific community, etc. In accordance with the data protection law, the individual SOEP data sets cannot be downloaded directly from the homepage. Moreover, the data are also subject to regulations limiting their use to scientific purposes. A DVD will be sent via certified mail for a price of 30€ + 8€ forwarding expenses.

Conditions of access


Data access must comply with high security standards for maintaining confidentiality and protecting personal privacy. Following the conclusion of a data distribution contract with DIW Berlin, contract holders receive the SOEP dataset on DVD by insured mail (38€).


around 14 days


anonymised microdata


The microdata from the Socio-Economic Panel are available in CSV, SAS, SPSS, and STATA format. Due to the large volume of data, they can only be analysed effectively using statistical software (SPSS; Stata; R; SAS and others).


Data and documentation are available in German and English (variables, Value Labels, Questionnaires, Documentation, etc.).

Access to data


On site access, downloadable files, DVD/CD after agreement, open access, data available only for scientific community, etc. In accordance with the data protection law, the individual SOEP data sets cannot be downloaded directly from the homepage. Moreover, the data are also subject to regulations limiting their use to scientific purposes. A DVD will be sent via certified mail for a price of 30€ + 8€ forwarding expenses.

Conditions of access


Data access must comply with high security standards for maintaining confidentiality and protecting personal privacy. Following the conclusion of a data distribution contract with DIW Berlin, contract holders receive the SOEP dataset on DVD by insured mail (38€).


around 14 days


anonymised microdata


The microdata from the Socio-Economic Panel are available in CSV, SAS, SPSS, and STATA format. Due to the large volume of data, they can only be analysed effectively using statistical software (SPSS; Stata; R; SAS and others).


Data and documentation are available in German and English (variables, Value Labels, Questionnaires, Documentation, etc.).

Access to data


On site access, downloadable files, DVD/CD after agreement, open access, data available only for scientific community, etc. In accordance with the data protection law, the individual SOEP data sets cannot be downloaded directly from the homepage. Moreover, the data are also subject to regulations limiting their use to scientific purposes. A DVD will be sent via certified mail for a price of 30€ + 8€ forwarding expenses.

Conditions of access


Data access must comply with high security standards for maintaining confidentiality and protecting personal privacy. Following the conclusion of a data distribution contract with DIW Berlin, contract holders receive the SOEP dataset on DVD by insured mail (38€).


around 14 days


anonymised microdata


The microdata from the Socio-Economic Panel are available in CSV, SAS, SPSS, and STATA format. Due to the large volume of data, they can only be analysed effectively using statistical software (SPSS; Stata; R; SAS and others).


Data and documentation are available in German and English (variables, Value Labels, Questionnaires, Documentation, etc.).

Access to data


On site access, downloadable files, DVD/CD after agreement, open access, data available only for scientific community, etc. In accordance with the data protection law, the individual SOEP data sets cannot be downloaded directly from the homepage. Moreover, the data are also subject to regulations limiting their use to scientific purposes. A DVD will be sent via certified mail for a price of 30€ + 8€ forwarding expenses.

Conditions of access


Data access must comply with high security standards for maintaining confidentiality and protecting personal privacy. Following the conclusion of a data distribution contract with DIW Berlin, contract holders receive the SOEP dataset on DVD by insured mail (38€).


around 14 days


anonymised microdata


The microdata from the Socio-Economic Panel are available in CSV, SAS, SPSS, and STATA format. Due to the large volume of data, they can only be analysed effectively using statistical software (SPSS; Stata; R; SAS and others).


Data and documentation are available in German and English (variables, Value Labels, Questionnaires, Documentation, etc.).

Access to data


On site access, downloadable files, DVD/CD after agreement, open access, data available only for scientific community, etc. In accordance with the data protection law, the individual SOEP data sets cannot be downloaded directly from the homepage. Moreover, the data are also subject to regulations limiting their use to scientific purposes. A DVD will be sent via certified mail for a price of 30€ + 8€ forwarding expenses.

Conditions of access


Data access must comply with high security standards for maintaining confidentiality and protecting personal privacy. Following the conclusion of a data distribution contract with DIW Berlin, contract holders receive the SOEP dataset on DVD by insured mail (38€).


around 14 days


anonymised microdata


The microdata from the Socio-Economic Panel are available in CSV, SAS, SPSS, and STATA format. Due to the large volume of data, they can only be analysed effectively using statistical software (SPSS; Stata; R; SAS and others).


Data and documentation are available in German and English (variables, Value Labels, Questionnaires, Documentation, etc.).


Coverage


The SOEP consists of a complex system of partial samples which have been integrated in different years into the panel. Sub-Samples: • Sample A: Residents in the FRG (1984) • Sample B: Foreigners in the FRG (1984) sample size A + B= 12,245 individuals • Sample C: German Residents in the GDR (1990), sample size of 4,453 individuals • Sample D: Immigrants (1994/95), sample size of 1,078 individuals • Sample E: Refreshment (1998), sample size of 1,923 individuals • Sample F: Innovation (2000), sample size of 10,890 individuals • Sample G: Oversampling of High Income (2002), sample size of 2,671 individuals • Sample H: Refreshment (2006), sample size of 2,616 individuals • Sample J: Incentivation (2009), sample size of 2,509 individuals • Sample K: Increase (2011), sample size of 5,161 individuals Total Samples: Complete sample size for selected years: 1984: 12,245 individuals; 1990: 13,971 individuals; 1995: 13,768 individuals; 1998: 14,692 individuals; 2000: 24,582 individuals; 2002: 23,443 individuals; 2006: 22,665 individuals; 2007: 21,7232 individuals, 2008: 19,945 individuals; 2009: 18,602 individuals, 2010: 17,156 individuals, 2011: 21,336 individuals


1984 (West Germany), 1990 (East Germany)


region (Federal States)


Random sample of German private households


National coverage. Access policies for regional information: • NUTS1 level: standard-DVD • NUTS2 level: extra CD with password • NUTS3: SOEPremote or DIW Berlin • NUTS5/LAU2: only at DIW Berlin • Zip codes, delivery area: only at DIW Berlin For more information see www.diw.de/sixcms/detail.php/237567 and www.diw.de/.../diw_datadoc_2007-017.pdf


persons aged 17 years and older


Life satisfaction using a one-item indicator has been assessed since 1984, while satisfaction with other life domains is assessed regularly, but is based on a different number of life domains during the years. Emotional wellbeing is assessed with four one-item indicators on frequency of feeling angry, worried, happy, and sad since 2007. Since 2002, every two years the SF-12 questionnaire, which assesses mental and physical health, is applied. In 2006 and 2011, questions concerning work stress were assessed.


For a list of all publications see.:www.diw.de/.../publications_with_soep_data.html
. • Bergheim, S. Well-being in Germany–its happy regions have much in common. Deutsche Bank Research, 2008. • Easterlin, R. A., & Plagnol, A. C. Life satisfaction and economic conditions in East and West Germany pre-and post-unification. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 68(3) (2008): 433-444. • Fujita, F., & Diener, E. Life satisfaction set point: Stability and change. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88(1) (2005): 158-164. • Gerstorf, D., Ram, N., Estabrook, R., Schupp, J., Wagner, G. G., & Lindenberger, U. Life satisfaction shows terminal decline in old age: Longitudinal evidence from the German Socioeconomic Panel Study. Developmental psychology, 44(4) (2008): 1148. • Proto, E., & Rustichini, A. Life Satisfaction, Household Income and Personality Traits. The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) (2012): 988. • Vatter, J. Well-being in Germany: What explains the regional variation?, 2012.

Coverage


The SOEP consists of a complex system of partial samples which have been integrated in different years into the panel. Sub-Samples: • Sample A: Residents in the FRG (1984) • Sample B: Foreigners in the FRG (1984) sample size A + B= 12,245 individuals • Sample C: German Residents in the GDR (1990), sample size of 4,453 individuals • Sample D: Immigrants (1994/95), sample size of 1,078 individuals • Sample E: Refreshment (1998), sample size of 1,923 individuals • Sample F: Innovation (2000), sample size of 10,890 individuals • Sample G: Oversampling of High Income (2002), sample size of 2,671 individuals • Sample H: Refreshment (2006), sample size of 2,616 individuals • Sample J: Incentivation (2009), sample size of 2,509 individuals • Sample K: Increase (2011), sample size of 5,161 individuals Total Samples: Complete sample size for selected years: 1984: 12,245 individuals; 1990: 13,971 individuals; 1995: 13,768 individuals; 1998: 14,692 individuals; 2000: 24,582 individuals; 2002: 23,443 individuals; 2006: 22,665 individuals; 2007: 21,7232 individuals, 2008: 19,945 individuals; 2009: 18,602 individuals, 2010: 17,156 individuals, 2011: 21,336 individuals


1984 (Western Germany), 1990 (Eastern Germany)


region (Federal States)


Random Sample of German private households


National coverage. Access policies for regional information: • NUTS1 level: standard-DVD • NUTS2 level: extra CD with password • NUTS3: SOEPremote or DIW Berlin • NUTS5/LAU2: only at DIW Berlin • Zip-codes, delivery area: only at DIW Berlin For more information see www.diw.de/sixcms/detail.php/237567 and www.diw.de/.../diw_datadoc_2007-017.pdf


persons aged 17 years and older


The SOEP provides data on • Demography and living situation • Personal characteristics and orientations (preferences, values etc.) • Education, vocational training and further training, qualification • Labour market and professional mobility • Incomes, property and social security • Health • Worries and satisfaction (general life satisfaction, area specific life satisfaction) All in all, the data set allows researchers to analyse these aspects in a longitudinal perspective, not only on an individual, but also on a household level. (cf. www.diw.de/.../soepfrabo_personen_2012_en.pdf
).


• Faik, J., & Köhler-Rama, T. Anstieg der Altersarmut? Anmerkungen zu einem Gutachten des wissenschaftlichen Beirats beim Bundeswirtschaftsministerium. In: Wirtschaftsdienst. Vol. 93 () (2013): 159-163, URL: www.wirtschaftsdienst.eu/.../
. • Uhde, N. Soziale Sicherheit und Lebenszufriedenheit: Empirische Ergebnisse. In: Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Vol. 11 (2) (2010): 407-439, URL: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/.../pdf
. • Heyne, St. Arm durch Arbeitslosigkeit? Einkommensverluste und Armut im Kontext der Hartz-Reformen. In: Zeitschrift für Soziologie, Vol. 41 (6) (2012): 418-434.

Coverage


The SOEP consists of a complex system of partial samples which have been integrated in different years into the panel. Sub-Samples: • Sample A: Residents in the FRG (1984) • Sample B: Foreigners in the FRG (1984) sample size A + B= 12,245 individuals • Sample C: German Residents in the GDR (1990), sample size of 4,453 individuals • Sample D: Immigrants (1994/95), sample size of 1,078 individuals • Sample E: Refreshment (1998), sample size of 1,923 individuals • Sample F: Innovation (2000), sample size of 10,890 individuals • Sample G: Oversampling of High Income (2002), sample size of 2,671 individuals • Sample H: Refreshment (2006), sample size of 2,616 individuals • Sample J: Incentivation (2009), sample size of 2,509 individuals • Sample K: Increase (2011), sample size of 5,161 individuals Total Samples: Complete sample size for selected years: 1984: 12,245 individuals; 1990: 13,971 individuals; 1995: 13,768 individuals; 1998: 14,692 individuals; 2000: 24,582 individuals; 2002: 23,443 individuals; 2006: 22,665 individuals; 2007: 21,7232 individuals, 2008: 19,945 individuals; 2009: 18,602 individuals, 2010: 17,156 individuals, 2011: 21,336 individuals


1984 (West Germany), 1990 (East Germany)


region (Federal States)


Random Sample of German private households


National coverage. Access policies for regional information: • NUTS1 level: standard-DVD • NUTS2 level: extra CD with password • NUTS3: SOEPremote or DIW Berlin • NUTS5/LAU2: only at DIW Berlin • Zip codes, delivery area: only at DIW Berlin For more information see www.diw.de/sixcms/detail.php/237567 and www.diw.de/.../diw_datadoc_2007-017.pdf


persons aged 17 years and older


In addition to aspects such as wellbeing, health, education and housing, employment-related questions and earnings and income can be analysed in particular detail. The data set does not only include a wide variety of questions on current employment (e.g. working hours, working overtime, correspondence with trained occupation, number of employees in the company, type of employment contract, job as part of job-creation measure or ‘1EuroJob’, commuting, individual preferences concerning working hours and days, partial retirement, industry, occupation, monthly salary, bonuses and benefits besides salary), but also information on the very first and the last job (e.g. when and how did it end, existence of new job prospect etc.), and hence allows observation of employment histories and occupational dynamics. Moreover, the survey includes information on job satisfaction, on job-related expectations (e.g. the estimated probability of losing the job, or chances on the labour market in case of job loss) and also captures secondary employment/work beyond retirement (cf. www.diw.de/.../soepfrabo_personen_2012_en.pdf
). All in all, the data set allows for an analysis of these aspects in a longitudinal perspective, not only on an individual, but also on a household level.


• Breke, Karl. Immer mehr Menschen im Rentenalter sind berufstätig. DIW Wochenbericht. No 6.2013. www.diw.de/.../13-6.pdf
• Frick, Joachim R., & Markus M. Grabka. Old-age pension entitlements mitigate inequality - but concentration of wealth remains high. In: Weekly Report 6 (8) (2010): 55-64. www.diw.de/.../diw_wr_2010-08.pdf
. • Grabka, Markus M. Distribution of household incomes in Germany: An updated analysis using the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) in the years 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2005 and 2009. Report for the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). Berlin: German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), 2011. • Lang, Julia. The aims of lifelong learning: Age-related effects of training on wages and job security. DIW SOEP PAPER 478, 2012. www.diw.de/.../diw_sp0478.pdf
. • Romeu Gordo, Laura, & Mertens, Antje. Do older workers earn more than they deserve? in: G. Doblhammer & J. W. Vaupel (Hrsg.) Demographischer Wandel - Hintergründe und Herausforderungen. Wiesbaden: VS, Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, 2010. • Schleife, Katrin (2004). Computer Use and the Employment Status of Older Workers - An Analysis Based on Individual Data, ZEW Discussion Paper No. 04-62, Mannheim. ftp://ftp.zew.de/pub/zew-docs/dp/dp0462.pdf
.

Coverage


The SOEP consists of a complex system of partial samples which have been integrated in different years into the panel. Sub-Samples: • Sample A: Residents in the FRG (1984) • Sample B: Foreigners in the FRG (1984) sample size A + B= 12,245 individuals • Sample C: German Residents in the GDR (1990), sample size of 4,453 individuals • Sample D: Immigrants (1994/95), sample size of 1,078 individuals • Sample E: Refreshment (1998), sample size of 1,923 individuals • Sample F: Innovation (2000), sample size of 10,890 individuals • Sample G: Oversampling of High Income (2002), sample size of 2,671 individuals • Sample H: Refreshment (2006), sample size of 2,616 individuals • Sample J: Incentivation (2009), sample size of 2,509 individuals • Sample K: Increase (2011), sample size of 5,161 individuals Total Samples: Complete sample size for selected years: 1984: 12,245 individuals; 1990: 13,971 individuals; 1995: 13,768 individuals; 1998: 14,692 individuals; 2000: 24,582 individuals; 2002: 23,443 individuals; 2006: 22,665 individuals; 2007: 21,7232 individuals, 2008: 19,945 individuals; 2009: 18,602 individuals, 2010: 17,156 individuals, 2011: 21,336 individuals


1984 (West Germany), 1990 (East Germany)


region (Federal States)


Random Sample of German private households


National coverage. Access policies for regional information: • NUTS1 level: standard-DVD, • NUTS2 level: extra CD with password • NUTS3: SOEPremote or DIW Berlin • NUTS5/LAU2: only at DIW Berlin • Zip-codes, delivery area: only at DIW Berlin For more information see www.diw.de/sixcms/detail.php/237567 and www.diw.de/.../diw_datadoc_2007-017.pdf


persons aged 17 years and older


The household questionnaire assesses the majority of housing-relevant indicators in the SOEP. Not all indicators are available for all waves, but since 1999 basic questions have been assessed annually. The housing indicators cover: ownership status, quality of dwelling, housing cost, moving, neighbourhood surroundings and residential environment, residential history, type of dwelling, household amenities, and satisfaction with housing. With regard to mobility, the SOEP had a specific module in 1998 and 2003, but very basic indicators such as availability of a driver’s license or access to cars are assessed more often, but not annually. The mobility module covers existence, accessibility and use of public transportation on site; existence and use of cars and bike in the household; type of transportation used to go to work, go shopping, during leisure time, for day trips and to transport kids; attitudes towards driving, public transportation, leisure time at home, and environment consciousness. Besides the annual assessment of satisfaction with housing, satisfaction with living area, environment conditions and goods and services offered on site are assessed irregularly.


• Diaz-Serrano, L. Housing satisfaction, homeownership and housing mobility: A panel data analysis for twelve EU countries, 2006. • Frick, J. R., & Grimm, S. Wohnen in Deutschland nach dem Mauerfall: Eine Analyse für die Jahre 1990 bis 2008 auf Basis der Daten des Sozio-oekonomischen Panels (SOEP) (No. 236/ 2009). DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). • Pollack, C. E., von dem Knesebeck, O., & Siegrist, J. Housing and health in Germany. Journal of epidemiology and community health, 58(3) (2004): 216-222. • Wagner, G. G., Frick, J. R., & Schupp, J. Enhancing the power of household panel studies: The case of the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP). Schmollers Jahrbuch, 127 (2007): 139-169. • Wahl, H. W., Schilling, O., & Oswald, F. Wohnen im Alter–spezielle Aspekte im ländlichen Raum. Altern im ländlichen Raum. Walter, U.; Altgeld, T.(Hrsg.). Campus. Frankfurt, (2000): 245-262.

Coverage


The SOEP consists of a complex system of partial samples which have been integrated in different years into the panel. Sub-Samples: • Sample A: Residents in the FRG (1984) • Sample B: Foreigners in the FRG (1984) sample size A + B= 12,245 individuals • Sample C: German Residents in the GDR (1990), sample size of 4,453 individuals • Sample D: Immigrants (1994/95), sample size of 1,078 individuals • Sample E: Refreshment (1998), sample size of 1,923 individuals • Sample F: Innovation (2000), sample size of 10,890 individuals • Sample G: Oversampling of High Income (2002), sample size of 2,671 individuals • Sample H: Refreshment (2006), sample size of 2,616 individuals • Sample J: Incentivation (2009), sample size of 2,509 individuals • Sample K: Increase (2011), sample size of 5,161 individuals Total Samples: Complete sample size for selected years: 1984: 12,245 individuals; 1990: 13,971 individuals; 1995: 13,768 individuals; 1998: 14,692 individuals; 2000: 24,582 individuals; 2002: 23,443 individuals; 2006: 22,665 individuals; 2007: 21,7232 individuals, 2008: 19,945 individuals; 2009: 18,602 individuals, 2010: 17,156 individuals, 2011: 21,336 individuals


1984 (Western Germany), 1990 (Eastern Germany)


region (Federal States)


Random sample of German private households


National coverage. Access policies for regional information: • NUTS1 level: standard-DVD • NUTS2 level: extra CD with password • NUTS3: SOEPremote or DIW Berlin • NUTS5/LAU2: only at DIW Berlin • Zip-codes, delivery area: only at DIW Berlin For more information see www.diw.de/sixcms/detail.php/237567 and www.diw.de/.../diw_datadoc_2007-017.pdf


persons aged 17 years and older


The SOEP is one of the most important data sets to analyse life-courses. It contains some items on volunteering and other forms of participation: • Volunteer work in clubs or social services, (yes/no, frequency) • Involvement in a citizens' group, political party, local government (yes/no, frequency) • Attending church, religious events (yes/no, frequency) All in all, the dataset allows researchers to analyse these aspects in a longitudinal perspective, not only on an individual, but also on a household level.


For a list of all publications see. www.diw.de/.../publications_with_soep_data.html
• Erlinghagen, M. Volunteering after retirement. Evidence from German panel data: In: European Societies. Vol. 12( 5) (2010): 603-625. • Strauß, S. Ehrenamt in Deutschland und Großbritannien - Sprungbrett zurück auf den Arbeitsmarkt? In: Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie (KZfSS), Vol. 61 (5) (2009): 647-670.

Coverage


The SOEP consists of a complex system of partial samples which have been integrated in different years into the panel. Sub-Samples: • Sample A: Residents in the FRG (1984) • Sample B: Foreigners in the FRG (1984) sample size A + B= 12,245 individuals • Sample C: German Residents in the GDR (1990), sample size of 4,453 individuals • Sample D: Immigrants (1994/95), sample size of 1,078 individuals • Sample E: Refreshment (1998), sample size of 1,923 individuals • Sample F: Innovation (2000), sample size of 10,890 individuals • Sample G: Oversampling of High Income (2002), sample size of 2,671 individuals • Sample H: Refreshment (2006), sample size of 2,616 individuals • Sample J: Incentivation (2009), sample size of 2,509 individuals • Sample K: Increase (2011), sample size of 5,161 individuals Total Samples: Complete sample size for selected years: 1984: 12,245 individuals; 1990: 13,971 individuals; 1995: 13,768 individuals; 1998: 14,692 individuals; 2000: 24,582 individuals; 2002: 23,443 individuals; 2006: 22,665 individuals; 2007: 21,7232 individuals, 2008: 19,945 individuals; 2009: 18,602 individuals, 2010: 17,156 individuals, 2011: 21,336 individuals


1984 (West Germany), 1990 (East Germany)


Region (federal states)


Random sample of German private households


National coverage. Access policies for regional information: • NUTS1 level: standard-DVD • NUTS2 level: extra CD with password • NUTS3: SOEPremote or DIW Berlin • NUTS5/LAU2: only at DIW Berlin • Zip codes, delivery area: only at DIW Berlin For more information see www.diw.de/sixcms/detail.php/237567 and www.diw.de/.../diw_datadoc_2007-017.pdf


persons aged 17 years and older


Family networks (spatial distance and self-evaluation of the relationship with parents, children, grandparents, grandchildren, siblings, other relatives) are assessed on an irregular basis (1991, 1996, 2001). Financial transfers given to relatives are assessed in almost all waves, while received financial transfers from relatives, however, are only assessed in certain waves (e.g. 2011, 2010, and 2009).


For a list of all publications see. www.diw.de/.../publications_with_soep_data.html
• Grabka, Markus M.Distribution of household incomes in Germany: An updated analysis using the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) in the years 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2005 and 2009. Report for the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). Berlin: German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), 2011. • Grünheid, Evelyn, & Manfred G. Scharein. Wächst die gemeinsame Zeit des Zusammenlebens von (Ur-)Enkeln und (Ur-) Großeltern? – Eine Modellrechnung. Bevölkerungsforschung Aktuell, Vol. 32 (2011): 2-6. www.bib-demografie.de/.../bev_aktuell_0111.pdf
• Grünheid, Evelyn, & Manfred G. Scharein.Zur Entwicklung der durchschnittlichen gemeinsamen Lebenszeit von Drei- und Vier-Generationen-Familien in West- und Ostdeutschland – Eine Modellrechnung. Comparative Population Studies - Zeitschrift für Bevölkerungswissenschaft, Vol. 36 (2011): 3-40. www.comparativepopulationstudies.de/.../16
• Szydlik, Marc. Erben in Europa. Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie (KZfSS), Vol. 63 (2011): 543-565.


Linkage


The SOEP data set contains various internationally harmonised standards (e.g. ISCED-97 (International Standard Classification of Education), ISCO-88 (International Standard Classification of Occupation)).The item on life satisfaction and the SF-12 (Ware et al., 1996) are internationally used standardised indicators of wellbeing.


The linkage among databases is not possible.

Linkage


The SOEP is part of the Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF). The CNEF contains equivalently defined variables for the US - Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), the British Household Panel Study (BHPS)/(Understanding Society), the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA), the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), the Korean Labour and Income Panel survey (KLIPS), and the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey-Higher School of Economics (RLMS-HSE). The data are designed to allow cross-national researchers to access a simplified version of these panels with guidelines for formulating equivalent variables across countries (cf. www.human.cornell.edu/.../cnef.cfm
and www.diw.de/.../schmoller_frick_etal_2007.pdf
). The SOEP dataset contains various internationally harmonised standards, such as • ISCO-88 (International Standard Classification of Occupation), • ISCED-97 (International Standard Classification of Education) • NACE (Nomenclature des statistiques des activités économiques de la Communauté européenne - Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community), • KLAS (occupational classification of the German Federal Statistical Office), • ISEI (International Socio-Economic Index of Occupational Status), • EGP (Erikson and Goldthorpe Class Category), • SIOPS (Treimans Standard Int. Occupation Prestige Score), • MPS (Magnitue-Prestige Scala - Wegener), • CASMIN (Comparative Analysis of Social Mobility in Industrial Nations)


The linkage among databases is not possible.

Linkage


The SOEP is part of the Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF). The CNEF contains equivalently defined variables for eight major surveys in eight countries: the US, Germany, Britain, Australia, Canada, Switzerland, Korea and Russia. (cf. www.human.cornell.edu/.../cnef.cfm
and www.diw.de/.../schmoller_frick_etal_2007.pdf
). The SOEP dataset contains various internationally harmonised standards such as • ISCO-88 (International Standard Classification of Occupation), • ISCED-97 (International Standard Classification of Education) • NACE (Nomenclature des statistiques des activités économiques de la Communauté européenne - Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community), • KLAS (occupational classification of the German Federal Statistical Office), • ISEI (International Socio-Economic Index of Occupational Status), • EGP (Erikson and Goldthorpe Class Category), • SIOPS (Treimans Standard Int. Occupation Prestige Score), • MPS (Magnitude-Prestige Scala - Wegener), • CASMIN (Comparative Analysis of Social Mobility in Industrial Nations)


Linkage among databases is not possible.

Linkage


The SOEP dataset contains various internationally harmonised standards (e.g. ISCED-97 (International Standard Classification of Education), ISCO-88 (International Standard Classification of Occupation)); the questions concerning housing are comparable to other major surveys, but they are not standardised.


Linkage among databases is not possible.

Linkage


The SOEP is part of the Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF). The CNEF contains equally defined variables for the US - Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), the British Household Panel Study (BHPS)/(Understanding Society), the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA), the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), the Korean Labour and Income Panel survey (KLIPS), and the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey-Higher School of Economics (RLMS-HSE). The data are designed to allow cross-national researchers to access a simplified version of these panels with guidelines for formulating equivalent variables across countries (cf. www.human.cornell.edu/.../cnef.cfm
and www.diw.de/.../schmoller_frick_etal_2007.pdf
). The SOEP dataset contains various internationally harmonised standards such as: • ISCO-88 (International Standard Classification of Occupation) • ISCED-97 (International Standard Classification of Education) • NACE (Nomenclature des statistiques des activités économiques de la Communauté européenne - Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community) • KLAS (occupational classification of the German Federal Statistical Office) • ISEI (International Socio-Economic Index of Occupational Status) • EGP (Erikson and Goldthorpe Class Category) • SIOPS (Treimans Standard Int. Occupation Prestige Score) • MPS (Magnitue-Prestige Scala - Wegener) • CASMIN (Comparative Analysis of Social Mobility in Industrial Nations)


The linkage among databases is not possible.

Linkage


The SOEP is part of the Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF). The CNEF contains equivalently defined variables for eight major surveys in eight countries: the US, Germany, Britain, Australia, Canada, Switzerland, Korea and Russia. (cf. www.human.cornell.edu/.../cnef.cfm
and www.diw.de/.../schmoller_frick_etal_2007.pdf
). The SOEP dataset contains various internationally harmonised standards such as: • ISCO-88 (International Standard Classification of Occupation) • ISCED-97 (International Standard Classification of Education) • NACE (Nomenclature des statistiques des activités économiques de la Communauté européenne - Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community) • KLAS (occupational classification of the German Federal Statistical Office) • ISEI (International Socio-Economic Index of Occupational Status) • EGP (Erikson and Goldthorpe Class Category) • SIOPS (Treimans Standard Int. Occupation Prestige Score) • MPS (Magnitude-Prestige Scala - Wegener) • CASMIN (Comparative Analysis of Social Mobility in Industrial Nations)


Linkage among databases is not possible.


Data quality


The Research Data Centre provides detailed information on known bugs and fixes on their website: www.diw.de/.../fixes.html
.


The names of variables might change over the waves, but the Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the dataset on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
and a web based documentation system available at http://panel.gsoep.de/soepinfo
. Moreover, the data set includes a variety of generated variables which do not change.


The Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the dataset on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
.

Data quality


The Research Data Centre provides detailed information on known bugs and fixes on their website: www.diw.de/.../fixes.html


The names of variables might change over the waves, but the Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the data set on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
and a web based documentation system available at http://panel.gsoep.de/soepinfo
. Moreover, the data set includes a variety of generated variables which do not change.


The Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the dataset on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
.

Data quality


The Research Data Centre provides detailed information on known bugs and fixes on their website: www.diw.de/.../fixes.html


The names of variables might change over the waves, but the Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the data set on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
and a web based documentation system available at http://panel.gsoep.de/soepinfo
. Moreover, the data set includes a variety of generated variables which do not change.


The Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the dataset on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html

Data quality


The Research Data Centre provides detailed information on known bugs and fixes on their website: www.diw.de/.../fixes.html


The names of variables might change over the waves, but the Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the data set on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
and a web based documentation system available at http://panel.gsoep.de/soepinfo
. Moreover, the data set includes a variety of generated variables which do not change.


The Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the data set on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
.

Data quality


The Research Data Centre provides detailed information on known bugs and fixes on their website: www.diw.de/.../fixes.html
.


The names of variables might change over the waves, but the Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the data set on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
and a web based documentation system available at http://panel.gsoep.de/soepinfo
. Moreover, the data set includes a variety of generated variables which do not change.


The Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the dataset on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
.

Data quality


The Research Data Centre provides detailed information on known bugs and fixes on their website: www.diw.de/.../fixes.html
.


The names of variables might change over the waves, but the Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the dataset on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
and a web based documentation system available at http://panel.gsoep.de/soepinfo
. Moreover, the data set includes a variety of generated variables which do not change.


The Research Data Centre of the SOEP provides detailed information on changes in the dataset on their website: www.diw.de/.../changes_in_the_dataset.html
.


Applicability


The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) is a household panel study like the PSID (Panel study of Income Dynamics in the US) and the BHPS (British Household Panel Study). Since the SOEP was – from the very beginning – designed with the intention to be used by national and international researches (cf. www.diw.de/.../diw_sp0001.pdf:7f
), its availability and usability for English-speaking researchers is excellent. It contains a wide variety of topics and a combination of objective and subjective indicators. Since life satisfaction has been assessed since 1984, one of the strengths of the SOEP is the possibility to analyse changes in life satisfaction over time and with regard to life events. Trend and cross-sectional analysis are also possible. The assessment of domain-specific satisfaction allows for more detailed analyses. It is positive that the SOEP assesses emotional wellbeing since 2007, however, the measurement limits analysis to four basic emotions and may not be able to capture emotional wellbeing in old age and among the oldest old. Taking into consideration that a variety of life domains and expectations are assessed, the SOEP allows for analysing determinants of wellbeing, as well as consequences of wellbeing differences. Since regional indicators can be matched, the interplay of individual and environmental factors on wellbeing can be analysed. Although the SOEP continues to interview participants after moving into institutional settings, the data is not representative for this sub-population with specific housing needs and mobility limitations.

Applicability


The SOEP is one of the most important German data sets to analyse life-courses. It was started in 1984 as a longitudinal survey of private households and persons. The central aim of this panel study is to collect representative microdata on persons, households and families in order to measure stability and change in living conditions by following principally a micro-economic approach enriched with sociology and political science variables (see: DTC. Desktop Companion to the SOEP, www.diw.de/.../dtc.409713.pdf#page=15
). Since the SOEP was – from the very beginning – designed with the intention to be used by national and international researches (cf. www.diw.de/.../diw_sp0001.pdf:7f
), its availability and usability for English-speaking researchers is excellent. It contains a wide variety of topics and a combination of objective and subjective indicators. The SOEP provides rich data on the issue „Social Systems and Welfare State“, such as items on education, training and qualification, on labour market and occupational dynamics and on earnings, income and social security. Documentation of the data and support by the Research Data Centre at the DIW are excellent.

Applicability


The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) is a household panel study like the PSID (Panel study of Income Dynamics in the US) and the BHPS (British Household Panel Study). Since the SOEP was – from the very beginning – designed with the intention to be used by national and international researches (cf. www.diw.de/.../diw_sp0001.pdf:7f
), its availability and usability for English-speaking researchers is excellent. It contains a wide variety of topics and a combination of objective and subjective indicators. Occupational dynamics, employment histories and several characteristics of the current employment, as well as other work-related issues can be analysed. These can be linked with other aspects, such as health or wellbeing. The dataset allows for the analysis of individual life-courses, as well as trends over time. Moreover, all aspects cannot only be analysed on an individual, but also on a household level. However, apart from a few questions on partial retirement or work beyond retirement, it contains neither special questions concerning older workers nor does it provide information on employers’ behaviour (personnel measures for older workers etc.).

Applicability


The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) is a household panel study like the PSID (Panel study of Income Dynamics in the US) and the BHPS (British Household Panel Study). Since the SOEP was – from the very beginning – designed with the intention to be used by national and international researchers (cf. www.diw.de/.../diw_sp0001.pdf:7f
), its availability and usability for English-speaking researchers is excellent. It contains a wide variety of topics and a combination of objective and subjective indicators. Housing information is covered at least basically in all waves. The great potential of the SOEP is the possibility to link subjective data with registry information on regional context factors (such as population structure in the community, etc.). This allows for analysing changes in housing needs and expectations with regard to regional characteristics. Questions concerning mobility can be analysed, but the data might not be up to date. Although the SOEP continues to interview participants after moving into institutional settings, the data is not representative for this sub-population with specific housing needs and mobility limitations.

Applicability


The SOEP was started in 1984 as a longitudinal survey of private households and persons. The central aim of this panel study is to collect representative microdata on persons, households and families in order to measure stability and change in living conditions by mainly following a micro-economic approach enriched with sociology and political science variables (see: DTC. Desktop Companion to the SOEP, www.diw.de/.../dtc.409713.pdf#page=15
) Since the SOEP was – from the very beginning – designed with the intention to be used by national and international researchers (cf. www.diw.de/.../diw_sp0001.pdf:7f
), its availability and usability for English-speaking researchers is excellent. It contains a wide variety of topics and a combination of objective and subjective indicators. The SOEP also provides some data on the issue of social participation and volunteering, these are items on memberships and frequency of such activities. Documentation of the data and support by the Research Data Centre at the DIW are excellent.

Applicability


The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) is a household panel study like the PSID (Panel study of Income Dynamics in the US) and the BHPS (British Household Panel Study). Since the SOEP was – from the very beginning – designed with the intention to be used by national and international researches (cf. www.diw.de/.../diw_sp0001.pdf:7f
), its availability and usability for English-speaking researchers is excellent. It contains a wide variety of topics and a combination of objective and subjective indicators. Intergenerational relationships, however, are not assessed extensively. Family networks (spatial distance, evaluation of relationships) are assessed on an irregular basis (1991, 1996, 2001). Financial transfers given to relatives are assessed in almost all waves, while received financial transfers from relatives, however, are only assessed in certain waves (e.g. 2009, 2010 and, 2011). However, relatives cannot be identified on an individual level since the questionnaire only asks for “son” or “daughter”, but not for names or other identifiers. Therefore, changes in the relationship quality or financial transfers cannot be related to specific individuals. As a result, relationships dynamics cannot be analysed. Moreover, the dataset does not include items on basic dimensions of relationships such as emotional closeness, frequency of contact or conflicts. Nevertheless, changes in financial transfers, as well as family networks, can be linked with other aspects such as health or wellbeing.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Andreas Motel-Klingebiel
  • (see Partners)