Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS)
European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS)

Topic
Work and Productivity
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Wellbeing
Intergenerational Relationships
Relevance for this Topic
Country Europe
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

European Foundation for the Improvement of Living & Working Conditions (Eurofound)
Wyattville Rd.
Dublin 18 Loughlinstown
Ireland
Phone: (+353-1) 20431 00
Fax: (+353-1) 2824209/2826456
Email: postmaster(at)eurofound.europa.eu
Url: www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/eqls/index.htm

Timeliness, transparency

As a general rule, datasets are made available no later than two years after fieldwork completion.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Access to data


Basic indicators published in reports. The data is free and available on the UK Data Service website. Most results are available on the Survey mapping tool on Eurofound’s website: http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/smt/3eqls/index.EF.php?locale=EN Forthcoming analytical reports: • Subjective wellbeing in Europe • Social inequalities of life in Europe • Quality of society and public services in Europe • Trends in Quality of Life in Europe 2003-2012

Conditions of access


Those interested in viewing or downloading the data must register on the UK Data Service website. In addition, non-UK residents or students must request a username. The data is available free of charge to all those who intend to use it for non-commercial purposes.


It may take up to 3 days to receive a username


Microdata


SPSS, STATA and TAB


Data and documentation are available in English.

Access to data


Basic indicators published in reports. The data is free and available on the UK Data Service website. Most results are available on the Survey mapping tool on Eurofound’s website: http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/smt/3eqls/index.EF.php?locale=EN Forthcoming analytical reports: • Subjective wellbeing in Europe • Social inequalities of life in Europe • Quality of society and public services in Europe • Trends in Quality of Life in Europe 2003-2012

Conditions of access


Those interested in viewing or downloading the data must register on the UK Data Service website. In addition, non-UK residents or students must request a username. The data is available free of charge to all those who intend to use it for non-commercial purposes.


It may take up to 3 days to receive a username


Microdata


SPSS, STATA and TAB


Data and documentation are available in English.

Access to data


Basic indicators published in reports. The data is free and available on the UK Data Service website. Most results are available on the Survey mapping tool on Eurofound’s website: http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/smt/3eqls/index.EF.php?locale=EN Forthcoming analytical reports: • Subjective wellbeing in Europe • Social inequalities of life in Europe • Quality of society and public services in Europe • Trends in Quality of Life in Europe 2003-2012

Conditions of access


Those interested in viewing or downloading the data must register on the UK Data Service website. In addition, non-UK residents or students must request a username. The data is available free of charge to all those who intend to use it for non-commercial purposes.


It may take up to 3 days to receive a username


Microdata


SPSS, STATA and TAB


Data and documentation are available in English.

Access to data


Basic indicators published in reports. The data is free and available on the UK Data Service website. Most results are available on the Survey mapping tool on Eurofound’s website: http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/smt/3eqls/index.EF.php?locale=EN Forthcoming analytical reports: • Subjective wellbeing in Europe • Social inequalities of life in Europe • Quality of society and public services in Europe • Trends in Quality of Life in Europe 2003-2012

Conditions of access


Those interested in viewing or downloading the data must register on the UK Data Service website. In addition, non-UK residents or students must request a username. The data is available free of charge to all those who intend to use it for non-commercial purposes.


It may take up to 3 days to receive a username


Microdata


SPSS, STATA and TAB


Data and documentation are available in English.

Access to data


Basic indicators published in reports. The data is free and available on the UK Data Service website. Most results are available on the Survey mapping tool on Eurofound’s website: http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/smt/3eqls/index.EF.php?locale=EN Forthcoming analytical reports: • Subjective wellbeing in Europe • Social inequalities of life in Europe • Quality of society and public services in Europe • Trends in Quality of Life in Europe 2003-2012

Conditions of access


Those interested in viewing or downloading the data must register on the UK Data Service website. In addition, non-UK residents or students must request a username. The data is available free of charge to all those who intend to use it for non-commercial purposes.


It may take up to 3 days to receive a username


Microdata


SPSS, STATA and TAB


Data and documentation are available in English.

Access to data


Basic indicators published in reports. The data is free and available on the UK Data Service website. Most results are available on the Survey mapping tool on Eurofound’s website: http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/smt/3eqls/index.EF.php?locale=EN Forthcoming analytical reports: • Subjective wellbeing in Europe • Social inequalities of life in Europe • Quality of society and public services in Europe • Trends in Quality of Life in Europe 2003-2012

Conditions of access


Those interested in viewing or downloading the data must register on the UK Data Service website. In addition, non-UK residents or students must request a username. The data is available free of charge to all those who intend to use it for non-commercial purposes.


It may take up to 3 days to receive a username


Microdata


SPSS, STATA and TAB


Data and documentation are available in English.

Access to data


Basic indicators published in reports. The data is free and available on the UK Data Service website. Most results are available on the Survey mapping tool on Eurofound’s website: http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/surveys/smt/3eqls/index.EF.php?locale=EN Forthcoming analytical reports: • Subjective wellbeing in Europe • Social inequalities of life in Europe • Quality of society and public services in Europe • Trends in Quality of Life in Europe 2003-2012

Conditions of access


Those interested in viewing or downloading the data must register on the UK Data Service website. In addition, non-UK residents or students must request a username. The data is available free of charge to all those who intend to use it for non-commercial purposes.


It may take up to 3 days to receive a username


Microdata


SPSS, STATA and TAB


Data and documentation are available in English.


Coverage


Wave 1 (2003): sample size was 26,000. Wave 2 (2007): data collected between September 2007 and February 2008. The sample size was over 35,000. Wave 3 (2012): data collected between September 2011 and February 2012. The sample size was 44,000.


2003


Divided based by region and urbanisation, regions were divided based on NUTS II or an equivalent.


Multi-stage, stratified, random sample


Wave 1 (2003): all EU member states were involved – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom – plus 3 candidate countries – Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey. Wave 2 (2007): All EU member states were involved – all those from 2003 and also including Bulgaria and Romania – plus 4 candidate countries – Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey. Wave 3 (2012): All EU member states were involved, plus the candidate countries of Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Serbia and Turkey.


18+ residents in the EU for at least six months.


This survey does provide a very broad overview of various policy fields considered. Throughout the waves, the core of the survey remains robust, but new or emerging topics are included according to the context. Wave 3 questionnaire shared around 50 per cent of the content covered by Wave 2. The data provides insights on the working conditions of the population, the work-life balance and the working time arrangements. Even when the EQLS is not aimed as a labour-oriented survey, it provides information on the perceived benefits and needs of intervention.


• Alber, J., Fahey, T., & Saraceno, C. "Handbook of quality life in the enlarged European Union". Routledge (2008). • Blanchflower, D. G. "International Evidence on Well-being". IZA - Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Are the poor socially integrated? The link between poverty and social support in different welfare regimes". Journal of European Social Policy (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Does society matter? Life satisfaction in the enlarged Europe". Social Indicators Research (2008). • Demoussis, M., & Giannakopoulos, N. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women". Journal of Socio-Economics (2008). • Dwyer, J., & Findeis, J. "Human and social capital in rural development - EU and US perspectives". EuroChoices (2008). • Egerton, M., & Mullan, K. "Being a pretty good citizen: An analysis and monetary valuation of formal and informal voluntary work by gender and educational attainment". Blackwell Publishing (2008). • Keck, W., & Saraceno, C. "Grandchildhood in Germany and Italy: An exploration". Emerald Group Publishing Limited (2008). • Shucksmith, S., Cameron , S., Merridew, T., & Pichler, F. “Urban–Rural Differences in Quality of Life across the European Union”. Regional Studies 43(10) (2009): 1275-1289.

Coverage


Wave 1 (2003): sample size was 26,000. Wave 2 (2007): data collected between September 2007 and February 2008. The sample size was over 35,000. Wave 3 (2012): data collected between September 2011 and February 2012. The sample size was 44,000.


2003


Divided based by region and urbanisation, regions were divided based on NUTS II or an equivalent.


Multi-stage, stratified, random sample


Wave 1 (2003): all EU member states were involved – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom – plus 3 candidate countries – Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey. Wave 2 (2007): All EU member states were involved – all those from 2003 and also including Bulgaria and Romania – plus 4 candidate countries – Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey. Wave 3 (2012): All EU member states were involved, plus the candidate countries of Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Serbia and Turkey.


18+ residents in the EU for at least six months.


This survey does provide a very broad overview of various policy fields considered. Throughout the waves, the core of the survey remains robust, but new or emerging topics are included according to the context. Wave 3 questionnaire shared around 50 per cent of the content covered by Wave 2. The EQLS provides insights on self-perceived health, as well as objective measures such as suffering from chronic physical or mental illnesses or disabilities. Regarding healthcare needs, the survey collects information on the access and perceived quality of healthcare, and also the reasons for not having received medical attention.


• Alber, J., Fahey, T., & Saraceno, C. "Handbook of quality life in the enlarged European Union". Routledge (2008). • Blanchflower, D. G. "International Evidence on Well-being". IZA - Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Are the poor socially integrated? The link between poverty and social support in different welfare regimes". Journal of European Social Policy (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Does society matter? Life satisfaction in the enlarged Europe". Social Indicators Research (2008). • Demoussis, M., & Giannakopoulos, N. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women". Journal of Socio-Economics (2008). • Dwyer, J., & Findeis, J. "Human and social capital in rural development - EU and US perspectives". EuroChoices (2008). • Egerton, M., & Mullan, K. "Being a pretty good citizen: An analysis and monetary valuation of formal and informal voluntary work by gender and educational attainment". Blackwell Publishing (2008). • Keck, W., & Saraceno, C. "Grandchildhood in Germany and Italy: An exploration". Emerald Group Publishing Limited (2008). • Shucksmith, S., Cameron , S., Merridew, T., & Pichler, F. “Urban–Rural Differences in Quality of Life across the European Union”. Regional Studies 43(10) (2009): 1275-1289.

Coverage


Wave 1 (2003): sample size was 26,000. Wave 2 (2007): data collected between September 2007 and February 2008. The sample size was over 35,000. Wave 3 (2012): data collected between September 2011 and February 2012. The sample size was 44,000.


2003


Divided based by region and urbanisation, regions were divided based on NUTS II or an equivalent.


Multi-stage, stratified, random sample


Wave 1 (2003): all EU member states were involved – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom – plus 3 candidate countries – Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey. Wave 2 (2007): All EU member states were involved – all those from 2003 and also including Bulgaria and Romania – plus 4 candidate countries – Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey. Wave 3 (2012): All EU member states were involved, plus the candidate countries of Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Serbia and Turkey.


18+ residents in the EU for at least six months.


This survey does provide a very broad overview of various policy fields considered. Throughout the waves, the core of the survey remains robust, but new or emerging topics are included according to the context. Wave 3 questionnaire shared around 50 per cent of the content covered by Wave 2. In regard to social systems and welfare, the survey provides basic information on the interaction between formal and informal forms of social protection.


• Alber, J., Fahey, T., & Saraceno, C. "Handbook of quality life in the enlarged European Union". Routledge (2008). • Blanchflower, D. G. "International Evidence on Well-being". IZA - Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Are the poor socially integrated? The link between poverty and social support in different welfare regimes". Journal of European Social Policy (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Does society matter? Life satisfaction in the enlarged Europe". Social Indicators Research (2008). • Demoussis, M., & Giannakopoulos, N. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women". Journal of Socio-Economics (2008). • Dwyer, J., & Findeis, J. "Human and social capital in rural development - EU and US perspectives". EuroChoices (2008). • Egerton, M., & Mullan, K. "Being a pretty good citizen: An analysis and monetary valuation of formal and informal voluntary work by gender and educational attainment". Blackwell Publishing (2008). • Keck, W., & Saraceno, C. "Grandchildhood in Germany and Italy: An exploration". Emerald Group Publishing Limited (2008). • Shucksmith, S., Cameron , S., Merridew, T., & Pichler, F. “Urban–Rural Differences in Quality of Life across the European Union”. Regional Studies 43(10) (2009): 1275-1289.

Coverage


Wave 1 (2003): sample size was 26,000. Wave 2 (2007): data collected between September 2007 and February 2008. The sample size was over 35,000. Wave 3 (2012): data collected between September 2011 and February 2012. The sample size was 44,000.


2003


Divided based by region and urbanisation, regions were divided based on NUTS II or an equivalent.


Multi-stage, stratified, random sample


Wave 1 (2003): all EU member states were involved – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom – plus 3 candidate countries – Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey. Wave 2 (2007): All EU member states were involved – all those from 2003 and also including Bulgaria and Romania – plus 4 candidate countries – Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey. Wave 3 (2012): All EU member states were involved, plus the candidate countries of Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Serbia and Turkey.


18+ residents in the EU for at least six months.


How does the data source approach the topic? Does it allows for a detailed study (e.g. LFS for labour topics) or just for a brief overview (e.g. LFS additional module on lifelong learning vs. Adult Education Survey)? This survey does provide a very broad overview of various policy fields considered. Throughout the waves, the core of the survey remains robust, but new or emerging topics are included according to the context. Wave 3 questionnaire shared around 50 per cent of the content covered by Wave 2. The survey addresses issues as the types and perceived quality of the surrounding environments, housing tenure, problems with dwellings, household structure, access to services, as well as material deprivation measures.


• Alber, J., Fahey, T., & Saraceno, C. "Handbook of quality life in the enlarged European Union". Routledge (2008). • Blanchflower, D. G. "International Evidence on Well-being". IZA - Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Are the poor socially integrated? The link between poverty and social support in different welfare regimes". Journal of European Social Policy (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Does society matter? Life satisfaction in the enlarged Europe". Social Indicators Research (2008). • Demoussis, M., & Giannakopoulos, N. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women". Journal of Socio-Economics (2008). • Dwyer, J., & Findeis, J. "Human and social capital in rural development - EU and US perspectives". EuroChoices (2008). • Egerton, M., & Mullan, K. "Being a pretty good citizen: An analysis and monetary valuation of formal and informal voluntary work by gender and educational attainment". Blackwell Publishing (2008). • Keck, W., & Saraceno, C. "Grandchildhood in Germany and Italy: An exploration". Emerald Group Publishing Limited (2008). • Shucksmith, S., Cameron , S., Merridew, T., & Pichler, F. “Urban–Rural Differences in Quality of Life across the European Union”. Regional Studies 43(10) (2009): 1275-1289.

Coverage


Wave 1 (2003): sample size was 26,000. Wave 2 (2007): data collected between September 2007 and February 2008. The sample size was over 35,000. Wave 3 (2012): data collected between September 2011 and February 2012. The sample size was 44,000.


2003


Divided based by region and urbanisation, regions were divided based on NUTS II or an equivalent.


Multi-stage, stratified, random sample


Wave 1 (2003): all EU member states were involved – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom – plus 3 candidate countries – Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey. Wave 2 (2007): All EU member states were involved – all those from 2003 and also including Bulgaria and Romania – plus 4 candidate countries – Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey. Wave 3 (2012): All EU member states were involved, plus the candidate countries of Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Serbia and Turkey.


18+ residents in the EU for at least six months.


This survey does provide a very broad overview of various policy fields considered. Throughout the waves, the core of the survey remains robust, but new or emerging topics are included according to the context. Wave 3 questionnaire shared around 50 per cent of the content covered by Wave 2. The EQLS allows for the analysis of the social networks and social support. It provides information on the participation in social and political activities, care given and provided, as well as the perceived tension and quality of the society. Moreover, it collects information on the trust in people and public institutions. Another feature of the survey is the collection of subjective social inclusion indicators and the involvement on civic, social and political activities.


• Alber, J., Fahey, T., & Saraceno, C. "Handbook of quality life in the enlarged European Union". Routledge (2008). • Blanchflower, D. G. "International Evidence on Well-being". IZA - Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Are the poor socially integrated? The link between poverty and social support in different welfare regimes". Journal of European Social Policy (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Does society matter? Life satisfaction in the enlarged Europe". Social Indicators Research (2008). • Demoussis, M., & Giannakopoulos, N. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women". Journal of Socio-Economics (2008). • Dwyer, J., & Findeis, J. "Human and social capital in rural development - EU and US perspectives". EuroChoices (2008). • Egerton, M., & Mullan, K. "Being a pretty good citizen: An analysis and monetary valuation of formal and informal voluntary work by gender and educational attainment". Blackwell Publishing (2008). • Keck, W., & Saraceno, C. "Grandchildhood in Germany and Italy: An exploration". Emerald Group Publishing Limited (2008). • Shucksmith, S., Cameron , S., Merridew, T., & Pichler, F. “Urban–Rural Differences in Quality of Life across the European Union”. Regional Studies 43(10) (2009): 1275-1289.

Coverage


Wave 1 (2003): sample size was 26,000. Wave 2 (2007): data collected between September 2007 and February 2008. The sample size was over 35,000. Wave 3 (2012): data collected between September 2011 and February 2012. The sample size was 44,000.


2003


Divided based by region and urbanisation, regions were divided based on NUTS II or an equivalent.


Multi-stage, stratified, random sample


Wave 1 (2003): all EU member states were involved – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom – plus 3 candidate countries – Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey. Wave 2 (2007): All EU member states were involved – all those from 2003 and also including Bulgaria and Romania – plus 4 candidate countries – Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey. Wave 3 (2012): All EU member states were involved, plus the candidate countries of Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Serbia and Turkey.


18+ residents in the EU for at least six months.


This survey does provide a very broad overview of various policy fields considered. Throughout the waves, the core of the survey remains robust, but new or emerging topics are included according to the context. Wave 3 questionnaire shared around 50 per cent of the content covered by Wave 2. The survey examines how people live and how they feel about their lives. This may allow for the study of subjective indicators of wellbeing and quality of life, life satisfaction, aspirations and happiness. In addition, the EQLS collects information on mental wellbeing, material deprivation, income, and social embeddedness. In terms of the aspects of life, the questionnaire collects information on satisfaction with health, accommodation, education, standard of living, family life, social life, and job.


• Alber, J., Fahey, T., & Saraceno, C. "Handbook of quality life in the enlarged European Union". Routledge (2008). • Blanchflower, D. G. "International Evidence on Well-being". IZA - Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Are the poor socially integrated? The link between poverty and social support in different welfare regimes". Journal of European Social Policy (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Does society matter? Life satisfaction in the enlarged Europe". Social Indicators Research (2008). • Demoussis, M., & Giannakopoulos, N. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women". Journal of Socio-Economics (2008). • Dwyer, J., & Findeis, J. "Human and social capital in rural development - EU and US perspectives". EuroChoices (2008). • Egerton, M., & Mullan, K. "Being a pretty good citizen: An analysis and monetary valuation of formal and informal voluntary work by gender and educational attainment". Blackwell Publishing (2008). • Keck, W., & Saraceno, C. "Grandchildhood in Germany and Italy: An exploration". Emerald Group Publishing Limited (2008). • Shucksmith, S., Cameron , S., Merridew, T., & Pichler, F. “Urban–Rural Differences in Quality of Life across the European Union”. Regional Studies 43(10) (2009): 1275-1289.

Coverage


Wave 1 (2003): sample size was 26,000. Wave 2 (2007): data collected between September 2007 and February 2008. The sample size was over 35,000. Wave 3 (2012): data collected between September 2011 and February 2012. The sample size was 44,000.


2003


Divided based by region and urbanisation, regions were divided based on NUTS II or an equivalent.


Multi-stage, stratified, random sample


Wave 1 (2003): all EU member states were involved – Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom – plus 3 candidate countries – Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey. Wave 2 (2007): All EU member states were involved – all those from 2003 and also including Bulgaria and Romania – plus 4 candidate countries – Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey. Wave 3 (2012): All EU member states were involved, plus the candidate countries of Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo, Serbia and Turkey.


18+ residents in the EU for at least six months.


This survey does provide a very broad overview of various policy fields considered. Throughout the waves, the core of the survey remains robust, but new or emerging topics are included according to the context. Wave 3 questionnaire shared around 50 per cent of the content covered by Wave 2. The EQLS allows for the analysis of the social networks and social support. It provides information on the participation in social and political activities, care given and provided, as well as the perceived tension and quality of the society. Moreover, it collects information on the trust in people and public institutions. Another feature of the survey is the collection of subjective social inclusion indicators and the involvement on civic, social and political activities. The dataset provides information on the intergenerational exchanges and contacts with kin.


• Alber, J., Fahey, T., & Saraceno, C. "Handbook of quality life in the enlarged European Union". Routledge (2008). • Blanchflower, D. G. "International Evidence on Well-being". IZA - Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Are the poor socially integrated? The link between poverty and social support in different welfare regimes". Journal of European Social Policy (2008). • Bohnke, P. "Does society matter? Life satisfaction in the enlarged Europe". Social Indicators Research (2008). • Demoussis, M., & Giannakopoulos, N. "Analysis of domain satisfactions: Evidence from a panel of Greek women". Journal of Socio-Economics (2008). • Dwyer, J., & Findeis, J. "Human and social capital in rural development - EU and US perspectives". EuroChoices (2008). • Egerton, M., & Mullan, K. "Being a pretty good citizen: An analysis and monetary valuation of formal and informal voluntary work by gender and educational attainment". Blackwell Publishing (2008). • Keck, W., & Saraceno, C. "Grandchildhood in Germany and Italy: An exploration". Emerald Group Publishing Limited (2008). • Shucksmith, S., Cameron , S., Merridew, T., & Pichler, F. “Urban–Rural Differences in Quality of Life across the European Union”. Regional Studies 43(10) (2009): 1275-1289.


Linkage


Education: ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) Occupation: ISCO 1 digit categories

Linkage


Education: ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) Occupation: ISCO 1 digit categories

Linkage


Education: ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) Occupation: ISCO 1 digit categories

Linkage


Education: ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) Occupation: ISCO 1 digit categories

Linkage


Education: ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) Occupation: ISCO 1 digit categories

Linkage


Education: ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) Occupation: ISCO 1 digit categories

Linkage


Education: ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) Occupation: ISCO 1 digit categories


Data quality


There were variations in which organization carried out the survey: 1. Wave 1 was conducted by the Intomart GfK, which assigned the task of drawing random samples and conducting interviews to national institutions in each participating country. 2. Wave 2 was conducted by TNS-Opinion, which also assigned the random sampling and interviewing to national institutions. 3. Wave 3 was conducted by GfK Significant, which assigned the sampling and interviewing tasks to its partner institutions. Regarding stratification: Wave 2 (2007): Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey did not use NUTS II. Wave 3 (2012): Cyprus, France, Luxembourg, Malta, Croatia and Kosovo did not use NUTS II for regional stratification.

Data quality


There were variations in which organization carried out the survey: 1. Wave 1 was conducted by the Intomart GfK, which assigned the task of drawing random samples and conducting interviews to national institutions in each participating country. 2. Wave 2 was conducted by TNS-Opinion, which also assigned the random sampling and interviewing to national institutions. 3. Wave 3 was conducted by GfK Significant, which assigned the sampling and interviewing tasks to its partner institutions. Regarding stratification: Wave 2 (2007): Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey did not use NUTS II. Wave 3 (2012): Cyprus, France, Luxembourg, Malta, Croatia and Kosovo did not use NUTS II for regional stratification.

Data quality


There were variations in which organization carried out the survey: 1. Wave 1 was conducted by the Intomart GfK, which assigned the task of drawing random samples and conducting interviews to national institutions in each participating country. 2. Wave 2 was conducted by TNS-Opinion, which also assigned the random sampling and interviewing to national institutions. 3. Wave 3 was conducted by GfK Significant, which assigned the sampling and interviewing tasks to its partner institutions. Regarding stratification: Wave 2 (2007): Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey did not use NUTS II. Wave 3 (2012): Cyprus, France, Luxembourg, Malta, Croatia and Kosovo did not use NUTS II for regional stratification.

Data quality


There were variations in which organization carried out the survey: 1. Wave 1 was conducted by the Intomart GfK, which assigned the task of drawing random samples and conducting interviews to national institutions in each participating country. 2. Wave 2 was conducted by TNS-Opinion, which also assigned the random sampling and interviewing to national institutions. 3. Wave 3 was conducted by GfK Significant, which assigned the sampling and interviewing tasks to its partner institutions. Regarding stratification: Wave 2 (2007): Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey did not use NUTS II. Wave 3 (2012): Cyprus, France, Luxembourg, Malta, Croatia and Kosovo did not use NUTS II for regional stratification.

Data quality


There were variations in which organization carried out the survey: 1. Wave 1 was conducted by the Intomart GfK, which assigned the task of drawing random samples and conducting interviews to national institutions in each participating country. 2. Wave 2 was conducted by TNS-Opinion, which also assigned the random sampling and interviewing to national institutions. 3. Wave 3 was conducted by GfK Significant, which assigned the sampling and interviewing tasks to its partner institutions. Regarding stratification: Wave 2 (2007): Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey did not use NUTS II. Wave 3 (2012): Cyprus, France, Luxembourg, Malta, Croatia and Kosovo did not use NUTS II for regional stratification.

Data quality


There were variations in which organization carried out the survey: 1. Wave 1 was conducted by the Intomart GfK, which assigned the task of drawing random samples and conducting interviews to national institutions in each participating country. 2. Wave 2 was conducted by TNS-Opinion, which also assigned the random sampling and interviewing to national institutions. 3. Wave 3 was conducted by GfK Significant, which assigned the sampling and interviewing tasks to its partner institutions. Regarding stratification: Wave 2 (2007): Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey did not use NUTS II. Wave 3 (2012): Cyprus, France, Luxembourg, Malta, Croatia and Kosovo did not use NUTS II for regional stratification.

Data quality


There were variations in which organization carried out the survey: 1. Wave 1 was conducted by the Intomart GfK, which assigned the task of drawing random samples and conducting interviews to national institutions in each participating country. 2. Wave 2 was conducted by TNS-Opinion, which also assigned the random sampling and interviewing to national institutions. 3. Wave 3 was conducted by GfK Significant, which assigned the sampling and interviewing tasks to its partner institutions. Regarding stratification: Wave 2 (2007): Croatia, Macedonia, Norway and Turkey did not use NUTS II. Wave 3 (2012): Cyprus, France, Luxembourg, Malta, Croatia and Kosovo did not use NUTS II for regional stratification.


Applicability


This survey does provide a broad overview of key domains relevant to quality of life. Among them, economic resources, health, employment and working conditions, education and training, families and households, community life and social participation, transport, and public safety and crime. The survey provides valuable information on the living conditions and wellbeing of Europeans. One of the drawbacks is the small sample size used. As a result, data can only reflect the views of relatively large social groups, and in addition, some categories might be insufficiently represented in unweighted samples. The EQLS offers a cross-sectional picture of households and their everyday life organisation. It entitles for the comparative analysis on gender, country and economic circumstances. In regard to the comparability of the results, changes in time should be interpreted cautiously since the perceptions, satisfactions and views of the interviewed might be affected by the socioeconomic conditions at the time of the survey. One of the strengths of the survey is that it allows for the analysis of participation in society, political activities, as well as social embeddedness. Even when the survey provides information on intergenerational relations and care, it does not allow for the analysis of the possible variations in living patterns.

Applicability


This survey does provide a broad overview of key domains relevant to quality of life. Among them, economic resources, health, employment and working conditions, education and training, families and households, community life and social participation, transport, and public safety and crime. The survey provides valuable information on the living conditions and wellbeing of Europeans. One of the drawbacks is the small sample size used. As a result, data can only reflect the views of relatively large social groups, and in addition, some categories might be insufficiently represented in unweighted samples. The EQLS offers a cross-sectional picture of households and their everyday life organisation. It entitles for the comparative analysis on gender, country and economic circumstances. In regard to the comparability of the results, changes in time should be interpreted cautiously since the perceptions, satisfactions and views of the interviewed might be affected by the socioeconomic conditions at the time of the survey. One of the strengths of the survey is that it allows for the analysis of participation in society, political activities, as well as social embeddedness. Even when the survey provides information on intergenerational relations and care, it does not allow for the analysis of the possible variations in living patterns.

Applicability


This survey does provide a broad overview of key domains relevant to quality of life. Among them, economic resources, health, employment and working conditions, education and training, families and households, community life and social participation, transport, and public safety and crime. The survey provides valuable information on the living conditions and wellbeing of Europeans. One of the drawbacks is the small sample size used. As a result, data can only reflect the views of relatively large social groups, and in addition, some categories might be insufficiently represented in unweighted samples. The EQLS offers a cross-sectional picture of households and their everyday life organisation. It entitles for the comparative analysis on gender, country and economic circumstances. In regard to the comparability of the results, changes in time should be interpreted cautiously since the perceptions, satisfactions and views of the interviewed might be affected by the socioeconomic conditions at the time of the survey. One of the strengths of the survey is that it allows for the analysis of participation in society, political activities, as well as social embeddedness. Even when the survey provides information on intergenerational relations and care, it does not allow for the analysis of the possible variations in living patterns.

Applicability


This survey does provide a broad overview of key domains relevant to quality of life. Among them, economic resources, health, employment and working conditions, education and training, families and households, community life and social participation, transport, and public safety and crime. The survey provides valuable information on the living conditions and wellbeing of Europeans. One of the drawbacks is the small sample size used. As a result, data can only reflect the views of relatively large social groups, and in addition, some categories might be insufficiently represented in unweighted samples. The EQLS offers a cross-sectional picture of households and their everyday life organisation. It entitles for the comparative analysis on gender, country and economic circumstances. In regard to the comparability of the results, changes in time should be interpreted cautiously since the perceptions, satisfactions and views of the interviewed might be affected by the socioeconomic conditions at the time of the survey. One of the strengths of the survey is that it allows for the analysis of participation in society, political activities, as well as social embeddedness. Even when the survey provides information on intergenerational relations and care, it does not allow for the analysis of the possible variations in living patterns.

Applicability


This survey does provide a broad overview of key domains relevant to quality of life. Among them, economic resources, health, employment and working conditions, education and training, families and households, community life and social participation, transport, and public safety and crime. The survey provides valuable information on the living conditions and wellbeing of Europeans. One of the drawbacks is the small sample size used. As a result, data can only reflect the views of relatively large social groups, and in addition, some categories might be insufficiently represented in unweighted samples. The EQLS offers a cross-sectional picture of households and their everyday life organisation. It entitles for the comparative analysis on gender, country and economic circumstances. In regard to the comparability of the results, changes in time should be interpreted cautiously since the perceptions, satisfactions and views of the interviewed might be affected by the socioeconomic conditions at the time of the survey. One of the strengths of the survey is that it allows for the analysis of participation in society, political activities, as well as social embeddedness. Even when the survey provides information on intergenerational relations and care, it does not allow for the analysis of the possible variations in living patterns.

Applicability


This survey does provide a broad overview of key domains relevant to quality of life. Among them, economic resources, health, employment and working conditions, education and training, families and households, community life and social participation, transport, and public safety and crime. The survey provides valuable information on the living conditions and wellbeing of Europeans. One of the drawbacks is the small sample size used. As a result, data can only reflect the views of relatively large social groups, and in addition, some categories might be insufficiently represented in unweighted samples. The EQLS offers a cross-sectional picture of households and their everyday life organisation. It entitles for the comparative analysis on gender, country and economic circumstances. In regard to the comparability of the results, changes in time should be interpreted cautiously since the perceptions, satisfactions and views of the interviewed might be affected by the socioeconomic conditions at the time of the survey. One of the strengths of the survey is that it allows for the analysis of participation in society, political activities, as well as social embeddedness. Even when the survey provides information on intergenerational relations and care, it does not allow for the analysis of the possible variations in living patterns.

Applicability


This survey does provide a broad overview of key domains relevant to quality of life. Among them, economic resources, health, employment and working conditions, education and training, families and households, community life and social participation, transport, and public safety and crime. The survey provides valuable information on the living conditions and wellbeing of Europeans. One of the drawbacks is the small sample size used. As a result, data can only reflect the views of relatively large social groups, and in addition, some categories might be insufficiently represented in unweighted samples. The EQLS offers a cross-sectional picture of households and their everyday life organisation. It entitles for the comparative analysis on gender, country and economic circumstances. In regard to the comparability of the results, changes in time should be interpreted cautiously since the perceptions, satisfactions and views of the interviewed might be affected by the socioeconomic conditions at the time of the survey. One of the strengths of the survey is that it allows for the analysis of participation in society, political activities, as well as social embeddedness. Even when the survey provides information on intergenerational relations and care, it does not allow for the analysis of the possible variations in living patterns.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Diana Lopez-Falcon
  • (see Partners)