Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Gender and Generation Survey or GGS (part of The Generations and Gender Programme or GGP)
Gender and Generation Survey or GGS (part of The Generations and Gender Programme or GGP)

Topic
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Intergenerational Relationships
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Work and Productivity
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Wellbeing
Relevance for this Topic
Country Belgium
URL
www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html
www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html
www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html
www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html
www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html
www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html
www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

General coordinator of the project is Patrick Deboosere (Vrije Universiteit Brussel – Interface Demography).
Interface Demography, Vakgroep Sociologie, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Pleinlaan 5
B-1050 Brussel
Belgium
Phone: +32 2 6148128
Email: tom.de.winter(at)vub.ac.be
Url: www.ggp-i.org/data/data-access.html

Timeliness, transparency

The data for the first wave were collected between 2008 and 2010. The data has been available upon request since 2011/2012.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional


Belgium has decided not to take part in the second wave of the GGS.

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional


Belgium has decided not to take part in the second wave of the GGS

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional


Belgium has decided not to take part in the second wave of the GGS

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional


Belgium has decided not to take part in the second wave of the GGS

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional


Belgium has decided not to take part in the second wave of the GGS

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional


Belgium has decided not to take part in the second wave of the GGS

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional


Belgium has decided not to take part in the second wave of the GGS.

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Access to data


The Belgian GGS data are available for scientific research free of charge.

Conditions of access


The GGP Contextual Database is freely accessible for everyone on the website. The online data browsing and analysis tool (access via NESSTAR online tool) only requires registration. Microdata users need to register and complete an application on the GGP-website. The following steps need to be completed: - submit a proposal with organizational affiliation and a short abstract via online form - sign the confidentiality documents - receive download links on your personal space @ GGP - download the data To receive the Belgian GGS microdata, you can also file an application with Statistics Belgium by e-mail (ggp(at)economie.fgov.be)


The online data browsing and analysis tool is immediately accessible after registration. The anonymised microdata can be received very fast after registration and completion of the application.


Aggregated tables, online data browsing and analysis tool, and anonymised microdata


Excel (contextual database), Nesstar (online analysis), and SPSS/SAS/… (microdata).


The Belgian questionnaires are not translated and are only available in Dutch and French on the Belgian website (www.ggps.be/index.htm). The core GGP-questionnaire is, however, available in English on the GGP-website (www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html).

Access to data


The Belgian GGS data are available for scientific research free of charge.

Conditions of access


The GGP Contextual Database is freely accessible for everyone on the website. The online data browsing and analysis tool (access via NESSTAR online tool) only requires registration. Microdata users need to register and complete an application on the GGP-website. The following steps need to be completed: - submit a proposal with organizational affiliation and a short abstract via online form - sign the confidentiality documents - receive download links on your personal space @ GGP - download the data To receive the Belgian GGS microdata, you can also file an application with Statistics Belgium by e-mail (ggp(at)economie.fgov.be)


The online data browsing and analysis tool is immediately accessible after registration. The anonymised microdata can be received very fast after registration and completion of the application.


Aggregated tables, online data browsing and analysis tool, and anonymised microdata


Excel (contextual database), Nesstar (online analysis), and SPSS/SAS/… (microdata).


The Belgian questionnaires are not translated and are only available in Dutch and French on the Belgian website (www.ggps.be/index.htm). The core GGP-questionnaire is, however, available in English on the GGP-website (www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html).

Access to data


The Belgian GGS data are available for scientific research free of charge.

Conditions of access


The GGP Contextual Database is freely accessible for everyone on the website. The online data browsing and analysis tool (access via NESSTAR online tool) only requires registration. Microdata users need to register and complete an application on the GGP-website. The following steps need to be completed: - submit a proposal with organizational affiliation and a short abstract via online form - sign the confidentiality documents - receive download links on your personal space @ GGP - download the data To receive the Belgian GGS microdata, you can also file an application with Statistics Belgium by e-mail (ggp(at)economie.fgov.be)


The online data browsing and analysis tool is immediately accessible after registration. The anonymised microdata can be received very fast after registration and completion of the application.


Aggregated tables, online data browsing and analysis tool, and anonymised microdata


Excel (contextual database), Nesstar (online analysis), and SPSS/SAS/… (microdata).


The Belgian questionnaires are not translated and are only available in Dutch and French on the Belgian website (www.ggps.be/index.htm). The core GGP-questionnaire is, however, available in English on the GGP-website (www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html).

Access to data


The Belgian GGS data are available for scientific research free of charge.

Conditions of access


The GGP Contextual Database is freely accessible for everyone on the website. The online data browsing and analysis tool (access via NESSTAR online tool) only requires registration. Microdata users need to register and complete an application on the GGP-website. The following steps need to be completed: - submit a proposal with organizational affiliation and a short abstract via online form - sign the confidentiality documents - receive download links on your personal space @ GGP - download the data To receive the Belgian GGS microdata, you can also file an application with Statistics Belgium by e-mail (ggp(at)economie.fgov.be)


The online data browsing and analysis tool is immediately accessible after registration. The anonymised microdata can be received very fast after registration and completion of the application.


Aggregated tables, online data browsing and analysis tool, and anonymised microdata


Excel (contextual database), Nesstar (online analysis), and SPSS/SAS/… (microdata).


The Belgian questionnaires are not translated and are only available in Dutch and French on the Belgian website (www.ggps.be/index.htm). The core GGP-questionnaire is, however, available in English on the GGP-website (www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html).

Access to data


The Belgian GGS data are available for scientific research free of charge.

Conditions of access


The GGP Contextual Database is freely accessible for everyone on the website. The online data browsing and analysis tool (access via NESSTAR online tool) only requires registration. Microdata users need to register and complete an application on the GGP-website. The following steps need to be completed: - submit a proposal with organizational affiliation and a short abstract via online form - sign the confidentiality documents - receive download links on your personal space @ GGP - download the data To receive the Belgian GGS microdata, you can also file an application with Statistics Belgium by e-mail (ggp(at)economie.fgov.be)


The online data browsing and analysis tool is immediately accessible after registration. The anonymised microdata can be received very fast after registration and completion of the application.


Aggregated tables, online data browsing and analysis tool, and anonymised microdata


Excel (contextual database), Nesstar (online analysis), and SPSS/SAS/… (microdata).


The Belgian questionnaires are not translated and are only available in Dutch and French on the Belgian website (www.ggps.be/index.htm). The core GGP-questionnaire is, however, available in English on the GGP-website (www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html).

Access to data


The Belgian GGS data are available for scientific research free of charge.

Conditions of access


The GGP Contextual Database is freely accessible for everyone on the website. The online data browsing and analysis tool (access via NESSTAR online tool) only requires registration. Microdata users need to register and complete an application on the GGP-website. The following steps need to be completed: - submit a proposal with organizational affiliation and a short abstract via online form - sign the confidentiality documents - receive download links on your personal space @ GGP - download the data To receive the Belgian GGS microdata, you can also file an application with Statistics Belgium by e-mail (ggp(at)economie.fgov.be)


The online data browsing and analysis tool is immediately accessible after registration. The anonymised microdata can be received very fast after registration and completion of the application.


Aggregated tables, online data browsing and analysis tool, and anonymised microdata


Excel (contextual database), Nesstar (online analysis), and SPSS/SAS/… (microdata).


The Belgian questionnaires are not translated and are only available in Dutch and French on the Belgian website (www.ggps.be/index.htm). The core GGP-questionnaire is, however, available in English on the GGP-website (www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html).

Access to data


The Belgian GGS data are available for scientific research free of charge.

Conditions of access


The GGP Contextual Database is freely accessible for everyone on the website. The online data browsing and analysis tool (access via NESSTAR online tool) only requires registration. Microdata users need to register and complete an application on the GGP-website. The following steps need to be completed: - submit a proposal with organizational affiliation and a short abstract via online form - sign the confidentiality documents - receive download links on your personal space @ GGP - download the data To receive the Belgian GGS microdata, you can also file an application with Statistics Belgium by e-mail (ggp(at)economie.fgov.be)


The online data browsing and analysis tool is immediately accessible after registration. The anonymised microdata can be received very fast after registration and completion of the application.


Aggregated tables, online data browsing and analysis tool, and anonymised microdata


Excel (contextual database), Nesstar (online analysis), and SPSS/SAS/… (microdata).


The Belgian questionnaires are not translated and are only available in Dutch and French on the Belgian website (www.ggps.be/index.htm). The core GGP-questionnaire is, however, available in English on the GGP-website (www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html).


Coverage


To obtain a representative sample of the whole population, the sampling was designed as a classical random sample, i.e. a stratified two-stage sample using the National Register as basis. The population is defined as the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 and living in Belgium. In a first stage, municipalities were selected and in a second stage, individuals within those municipalities were selected. 17,836 people in total were selected this way. Data were collected between February 2008 and May 2010. 7,163 men and women participated in the study. With regard to the population of interest for the JPI project, the sample contains 1,356 men and women between 50 and 59 years old, 1,029 between 60 and 69 years old and 737 between 70 and 79 years old.


2008


Disproportional stratification by region and a proportional (post)stratification by sex and age (age categories 18-44 & 45-79) within the regions. National weighting coefficients correct for the disproportional stratification by region.


National Register


Belgium, with possibility for breakdown according to NUTS1/NUTS2 region.


Population ranges from 18 to 79.


Non-institutionalized population aged 18-79


For Belgium, the GGS is the single most important dataset to study intergenerational relationships (e.g. the questionnaire contains both attitude scales regarding intergenerational support, and information on emotional, financial and logistic support between generations and personal care giving by family members). In addition, the dataset can be used to evaluate work and productivity (e.g. distribution of older people across the workforce, the association between working longer and different wellbeing dimensions); wellbeing (e.g. wellbeing outcomes and determinants can be compared for older and younger people); health and performance; housing; and, social, civic and cultural engagement. The data allow for a life-course perspective (timings of leaving the parental home, fertility behaviour, partnerships and union formation, ....).


Currently, the following English publications use the GGS-data on Belgium: • Jappens, M., & van Bavel, J. “Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe”. Demographic Research 27 (2012): 85-120. • Lodewijckx, L., & Deboosere P. “Households and families: stability and fast development go hand in hand”. GGP Belgium Paper Series (2011). For more methodological information, see (among others): • Neels, K., Van Rossem, R., Lauwereys, G., & De Winter, T. “Wave 1 Sample design”. GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 1 (2011). • Pasteels, I., De Winter, T., Lauwereys, G., & Neels, K. “Wave 1 Interview analysis” . GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 4. (2011). Available at: Series_4.pdf. For an analysis of the bias encountered by not including the institutionalised elderly (cf. strengths and weaknesses), see: • Peeters, H., Debels, A., & Verpoorten, R. “Excluding Institutionalized Elderly from Surveys: Consequences for Income and Poverty Statistics”. Social Indicators Research 110 (2) (2013): 751-769.

Coverage


To obtain a representative sample of the whole population, the sampling was designed as a classical random sample, i.e. a stratified two-stage sample using the National Register as basis. The population is defined as the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 and living in Belgium. In a first stage, municipalities were selected and in a second stage, individuals within those municipalities were selected. 17,836 people in total were selected this way. Data were collected between February 2008 and May 2010. 7,163 men and women participated in the study. With regard to the population of interest for the JPI project, the sample contains 1,356 men and women between 50 and 59 years old, 1,029 between 60 and 69 years old and 737 between 70 and 79 years old.


2008


Disproportional stratification by region and a proportional (post)stratification by sex and age (age categories 18-44 & 45-79) within the regions. National weighting coefficients correct for the disproportional stratification by region.


National Register


Belgium, with possibility for breakdown according to NUTS1/NUTS2 region.


Population ranges from 18 to 79.


Non-institutionalized population aged 18-79


For Belgium, the GGS is the single most important dataset to study intergenerational relationships (e.g. the questionnaire contains both attitude scales regarding intergenerational support, and information on emotional, financial and logistic support between generations and personal care giving by family members). In addition, the dataset can be used to evaluate work and productivity (e.g. distribution of older people across the workforce, the association between working longer and different wellbeing dimensions); wellbeing (e.g. wellbeing outcomes and determinants can be compared for older and younger people); health and performance; housing; and, social, civic and cultural engagement. The data allow for a life-course perspective (timings of leaving the parental home, fertility behaviour, partnerships and union formation, ....).


Currently, the following English publications use the GGS-data on Belgium: • Jappens, M., & van Bavel, J. “Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe”. Demographic Research 27 (2012): 85-120. • Lodewijckx, L., & Deboosere P. “Households and families: stability and fast development go hand in hand”. GGP Belgium Paper Series (2011). For more methodological information, see (among others): • Neels, K., Van Rossem, R., Lauwereys, G., & De Winter, T. “Wave 1 Sample design”. GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 1 (2011). • Pasteels, I., De Winter, T., Lauwereys, G., & Neels, K. “Wave 1 Interview analysis” . GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 4. (2011). Available at: Series_4.pdf. For an analysis of the bias encountered by not including the institutionalised elderly (cf. strengths and weaknesses), see: • Peeters, H., Debels, A., & Verpoorten, R. “Excluding Institutionalized Elderly from Surveys: Consequences for Income and Poverty Statistics”. Social Indicators Research 110 (2) (2013): 751-769.

Coverage


To obtain a representative sample of the whole population, the sampling was designed as a classical random sample, i.e. a stratified two-stage sample using the National Register as basis. The population is defined as the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 and living in Belgium. In a first stage, municipalities were selected and in a second stage, individuals within those municipalities were selected. 17,836 people in total were selected this way. Data were collected between February 2008 and May 2010. 7,163 men and women participated in the study. With regard to the population of interest for the JPI project, the sample contains 1,356 men and women between 50 and 59 years old, 1,029 between 60 and 69 years old and 737 between 70 and 79 years old.


2008


Disproportional stratification by region and a proportional (post)stratification by sex and age (age categories 18-44 & 45-79) within the regions. National weighting coefficients correct for the disproportional stratification by region.


National Register


Belgium, with possibility for breakdown according to NUTS1/NUTS2 region.


Population ranges from 18 to 79.


Non-institutionalized population aged 18-79


For Belgium, the GGS is the single most important dataset to study intergenerational relationships (e.g. the questionnaire contains both attitude scales regarding intergenerational support, and information on emotional, financial and logistical support between generations and personal care giving by family members). In addition, the dataset can be used to evaluate work and productivity (e.g. distribution of older people across the workforce, the association between working longer and different wellbeing dimensions); wellbeing (e.g. wellbeing outcomes and determinants can be compared for older and younger people); health and performance; housing; and, social, civic and cultural engagement. The data allow for a life-course perspective (timings of leaving the parental home, fertility behaviour, partnerships and union formation, ....).


Currently, the following English publications use the GGS-data on Belgium: • Jappens, M., & van Bavel, J. “Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe”. Demographic Research 27 (2012): 85-120. • Lodewijckx, L., & Deboosere P. “Households and families: stability and fast development go hand in hand”. GGP Belgium Paper Series (2011). For more methodological information, see (among others): • Neels, K., Van Rossem, R., Lauwereys, G., & De Winter, T. “Wave 1 Sample design”. GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 1 (2011). • Pasteels, I., De Winter, T., Lauwereys, G., & Neels, K. “Wave 1 Interview analysis” . GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 4. (2011). Available at: Series_4.pdf. For an analysis of the bias encountered by not including the institutionalised elderly (cf. strengths and weaknesses), see: • Peeters, H., Debels, A., & Verpoorten, R. “Excluding Institutionalized Elderly from Surveys: Consequences for Income and Poverty Statistics”. Social Indicators Research 110(2) (2013): 751-769.

Coverage


To obtain a representative sample of the whole population, the sampling was designed as a classical random sample, i.e. a stratified two-stage sample using the National Register as basis. The population is defined as the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 and living in Belgium. In a first stage, municipalities were selected and in a second stage, individuals within those municipalities were selected. 17,836 people in total were selected this way. Data were collected between February 2008 and May 2010. 7,163 men and women participated in the study. With regard to the population of interest for the JPI project, the sample contains 1,356 men and women between 50 and 59 years old, 1,029 between 60 and 69 years old and 737 between 70 and 79 years old.


2008


Disproportional stratification by region and a proportional (post)stratification by sex and age (age categories 18-44 & 45-79) within the regions. National weighting coefficients correct for the disproportional stratification by region.


National Register


Belgium, with possibility for breakdown according to NUTS1/NUTS2 region.


Population ranges from 18 to 79.


Non-institutionalized population aged 18-79


For Belgium, the GGS is the single most important dataset to study intergenerational relationships (e.g. the questionnaire contains both attitude scales regarding intergenerational support, and information on emotional, financial and logistic support between generations and personal care giving by family members). In addition, the dataset can be used to evaluate work and productivity (e.g. distribution of older people across the workforce, the association between working longer and different wellbeing dimensions); wellbeing (e.g. wellbeing outcomes and determinants can be compared for older and younger people); health and performance; housing; and, social, civic and cultural engagement. The data allow for a life-course perspective (timings of leaving the parental home, fertility behaviour, partnerships and union formation, ....).


Currently, the following English publications use the GGS-data on Belgium: • Jappens, M., & van Bavel, J. “Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe”. Demographic Research 27 (2012): 85-120. • Lodewijckx, L., & Deboosere P. “Households and families: stability and fast development go hand in hand”. GGP Belgium Paper Series (2011). For more methodological information, see (among others): • Neels, K., Van Rossem, R., Lauwereys, G., & De Winter, T. “Wave 1 Sample design”. GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 1 (2011). • Pasteels, I., De Winter, T., Lauwereys, G., & Neels, K. “Wave 1 Interview analysis” . GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 4. (2011). Available at: Series_4.pdf. For an analysis of the bias encountered by not including the institutionalised elderly (cf. strengths and weaknesses), see: • Peeters, H., Debels, A., & Verpoorten, R. “Excluding Institutionalized Elderly from Surveys: Consequences for Income and Poverty Statistics”. Social Indicators Research 110 (2) (2013): 751-769.

Coverage


To obtain a representative sample of the whole population, the sampling was designed as a classical random sample, i.e. a stratified two-stage sample using the National Register as basis. The population is defined as the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 and living in Belgium. In a first stage, municipalities were selected and in a second stage, individuals within those municipalities were selected. 17,836 people in total were selected this way. Data were collected between February 2008 and May 2010. 7,163 men and women participated in the study. With regard to the population of interest for the JPI project, the sample contains 1,356 men and women between 50 and 59 years old, 1,029 between 60 and 69 years old and 737 between 70 and 79 years old.


2008


Disproportional stratification by region and a proportional (post)stratification by sex and age (age categories 18-44 & 45-79) within the regions. National weighting coefficients correct for the disproportional stratification by region.


National Register


Belgium, with possibility for breakdown according to NUTS1/NUTS2 region.


Population ranges from 18 to 79.


Non-institutionalized population aged 18-79


For Belgium, the GGS is the single most important dataset to study intergenerational relationships (e.g. the questionnaire contains both attitude scales regarding intergenerational support, and information on emotional, financial and logistic support between generations and personal care giving by family members). In addition, the dataset can be used to evaluate work and productivity (e.g. distribution of older people across the workforce, the association between working longer and different wellbeing dimensions); wellbeing (e.g. wellbeing outcomes and determinants can be compared for older and younger people); health and performance; housing; and, social, civic and cultural engagement. The data allow for a life-course perspective (timings of leaving the parental home, fertility behaviour, partnerships and union formation, ....).


Currently, the following English publications use the GGS-data on Belgium: • Jappens, M., & van Bavel, J. “Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe”. Demographic Research 27 (2012): 85-120. • Lodewijckx, L., & Deboosere P. “Households and families: stability and fast development go hand in hand”. GGP Belgium Paper Series (2011). For more methodological information, see (among others): • Neels, K., Van Rossem, R., Lauwereys, G., & De Winter, T. “Wave 1 Sample design”. GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 1 (2011). • Pasteels, I., De Winter, T., Lauwereys, G., & Neels, K. “Wave 1 Interview analysis” . GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 4. (2011). Available at: Series_4.pdf. For an analysis of the bias encountered by not including the institutionalised elderly (cf. strengths and weaknesses), see: • Peeters, H., Debels, A., & Verpoorten, R. “Excluding Institutionalized Elderly from Surveys: Consequences for Income and Poverty Statistics”. Social Indicators Research 110 (2) (2013): 751-769.

Coverage


To obtain a representative sample of the whole population, the sampling was designed as a classical random sample, i.e. a stratified two-stage sample using the National Register as basis. The population is defined as the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 and living in Belgium. In a first stage, municipalities were selected and in a second stage, individuals within those municipalities were selected. 17,836 people in total were selected this way. Data were collected between February 2008 and May 2010. 7,163 men and women participated in the study. With regard to the population of interest for the JPI project, the sample contains 1,356 men and women between 50 and 59 years old, 1,029 between 60 and 69 years old and 737 between 70 and 79 years old.


2008


Disproportional stratification by region and a proportional (post)stratification by sex and age (age categories 18-44 & 45-79) within the regions. National weighting coefficients correct for the disproportional stratification by region.


National Register


Belgium, with possibility for breakdown according to NUTS1/NUTS2 region.


Population ranges from 18 to 79. Population representative


Non-institutionalized population aged 18-79


For Belgium, the GGS is the single most important dataset to study intergenerational relationships (e.g. the questionnaire contains both attitude scales regarding intergenerational support, information on emotional, financial and logistic support between generations and personal care giving by family members). In addition, the dataset can be used to evaluate work and productivity (e.g. distribution of older people across the workforce, the association between working longer and different wellbeing dimensions); wellbeing (e.g. wellbeing outcomes and determinants can be compared for older and younger people); health and performance; housing; and, social, civic and cultural engagement. The data allow for a life-course perspective (timings of leaving the parental home, fertility behaviour, partnerships and union formation, ....).


Currently, the following English publications use the GGS-data on Belgium: • Jappens, M., & van Bavel, J. “Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe”. Demographic Research 27 (2012): 85-120. • Lodewijckx, L., & Deboosere P. “Households and families: stability and fast development go hand in hand”. GGP Belgium Paper Series (2011). For more methodological information, see (among others): • Neels, K., Van Rossem, R., Lauwereys, G., & De Winter, T. “Wave 1 Sample design”. GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 1 (2011). • Pasteels, I., De Winter, T., Lauwereys, G., & Neels, K. “Wave 1 Interview analysis” . GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 4. (2011). Available at: Series_4.pdf. For an analysis of the bias encountered by not including the institutionalised elderly (cf. strengths and weaknesses), see: • Peeters, H., Debels, A., & Verpoorten, R. “Excluding Institutionalized Elderly from Surveys: Consequences for Income and Poverty Statistics”. Social Indicators Research 110 (2) (2013): 751-769.

Coverage


To obtain a representative sample of the whole population, the sampling was designed as a classical random sample, i.e. a stratified two-stage sample using the National Register as basis. The population is defined as the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 and living in Belgium. In a first stage, municipalities were selected and in a second stage, individuals within those municipalities were selected. 17,836 people in total were selected this way. Data were collected between February 2008 and May 2010. 7,163 men and women participated in the study. With regard to the population of interest for the JPI project, the sample contains 1,356 men and women between 50 and 59 years old, 1,029 between 60 and 69 years old and 737 between 70 and 79 years old.


2008


Disproportional stratification by region and a proportional (post)stratification by sex and age (age categories 18-44 & 45-79) within the regions. National weighting coefficients correct for the disproportional stratification by region.


National Register


Belgium, with possibility for breakdown according to NUTS1/NUTS2 region.


Population ranges from 18 to 79.


Non-institutionalized population aged 18-79


For Belgium, the GGS is the single most important dataset to study intergenerational relationships (e.g. the questionnaire contains both attitude scales regarding intergenerational support, and information on emotional, financial and logistic support between generations and personal care giving by family members). In addition, the dataset can be used to evaluate work and productivity (e.g. distribution of older people across the workforce, the association between working longer and different wellbeing dimensions); wellbeing (e.g. wellbeing outcomes and determinants can be compared for older and younger people); health and performance; housing; and, social, civic and cultural engagement. The data allow for a life-course perspective (timings of leaving the parental home, fertility behaviour, partnerships and union formation, ....).


Currently, the following English publications use the GGS-data on Belgium: • Jappens, M., & van Bavel, J. “Regional family cultures and child care by grandparents in Europe”. Demographic Research 27 (2012): 85-120. • Lodewijckx, L., & Deboosere P. “Households and families: stability and fast development go hand in hand”. GGP Belgium Paper Series (2011). For more methodological information, see (among others): • Neels, K., Van Rossem, R., Lauwereys, G., & De Winter, T. “Wave 1 Sample design”. GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 1 (2011). • Pasteels, I., De Winter, T., Lauwereys, G., & Neels, K. “Wave 1 Interview analysis” . GGP Belgium Paper Series – No. 4. (2011). Available at: Series_4.pdf. For an analysis of the bias encountered by not including the institutionalised elderly (cf. strengths and weaknesses), see: • Peeters, H., Debels, A., & Verpoorten, R. “Excluding Institutionalized Elderly from Surveys: Consequences for Income and Poverty Statistics”. Social Indicators Research 110 (2) (2013): 751-769.


Linkage


The purpose of the Generations and Gender Program is to collect internationally comparable data in the participating countries. Therefore, the United Nations developed an international standardized questionnaire.


As the Belgian sample was drawn from the National Register, the (confidential) data contain the National Register number for each respondent. Theoretically, this makes it possible to link the GGS data to administrative datasets. Such a link so far has not been made and it is unclear to what extent such linkage would be accepted by the Belgian Privacy Commission.

Linkage


The purpose of the Generations and Gender Program is to collect internationally comparable data in the participating countries. Therefore, the United Nations developed an international standardized questionnaire.


As the Belgian sample was drawn from the National Register, the (confidential) data contain the National Register number for each respondent. Theoretically, this makes it possible to link the GGS data to administrative datasets. Such a link so far has not been made and it is unclear to what extent such linkage would be accepted by the Belgian Privacy Commission.

Linkage


The purpose of the Generations and Gender Program is to collect internationally comparable data in the participating countries. Therefore, the United Nations developed an international standardized questionnaire.


As the Belgian sample was drawn from the National Register, the (confidential) data contain the National Register number for each respondent. Theoretically, this makes it possible to link the GGS data to administrative datasets. Such a link so far has not been made and it is unclear to what extent such linkage would be accepted by the Belgian Privacy Commission.

Linkage


The purpose of the Generations and Gender Program is to collect internationally comparable data in the participating countries. Therefore, the United Nations developed an international standardized questionnaire.


As the Belgian sample was drawn from the National Register, the (confidential) data contain the National Register number for each respondent. Theoretically, this makes it possible to link the GGS data to administrative datasets. Such a link so far has not been made and it is unclear to what extent such linkage would be accepted by the Belgian Privacy Commission.

Linkage


The purpose of the Generations and Gender Program is to collect internationally comparable data in the participating countries. Therefore, the United Nations developed an international standardized questionnaire.


As the Belgian sample was drawn from the National Register, the (confidential) data contain the National Register number for each respondent. Theoretically, this makes it possible to link the GGS data to administrative datasets. Such a link so far has not been made and it is unclear to what extent such linkage would be accepted by the Belgian Privacy Commission.

Linkage


The purpose of the Generations and Gender Program is to collect internationally comparable data in the participating countries. Therefore, the United Nations developed an international standardized questionnaire.


As the Belgian sample was drawn from the National Register, the (confidential) data contain the National Register number for each respondent. Theoretically, this makes it possible to link the GGS data to administrative datasets. Such a link so far has not been made and it is unclear to what extent such linkage would be accepted by the Belgian Privacy Commission.

Linkage


The purpose of the Generations and Gender Program is to collect internationally comparable data in the participating countries. Therefore, the United Nations developed an international standardized questionnaire.


As the Belgian sample was drawn from the National Register, the (confidential) data contain the National Register number for each respondent. Theoretically, this makes it possible to link the GGS data to administrative datasets. Such a link so far has not been made and it is unclear to what extent such linkage would be accepted by the Belgian Privacy Commission.


Data quality


Overall response rate was 42%. After data collection, non-response at both interview and item level were corrected through weighting factors when necessary. The fieldwork was closely monitored in order to maximize efficiency of the data collection and quality of the collected data. Interviews were taken at the respondent’s home through face-to-face interviews (CAPI).

Data quality


Overall response rate was 42%. After data collection, non-response at both interview and item level were corrected through weighting factors when necessary. The fieldwork was closely monitored in order to maximize efficiency of the data collection and quality of the collected data. Interviews were taken at the respondent’s home through face-to-face interviews (CAPI).

Data quality


Overall response rate was 42%. After data collection, non-response at both interview and item level were corrected through weighting factors when necessary. The fieldwork was closely monitored in order to maximize efficiency of the data collection and quality of the collected data. Interviews were taken at the respondent’s home through face-to-face interviews (CAPI).

Data quality


Overall response rate was 42%. After data collection, non-response at both interview and item level were corrected through weighting factors when necessary. The fieldwork was closely monitored in order to maximize efficiency of the data collection and quality of the collected data. Interviews were taken at the respondent’s home through face-to-face interviews (CAPI).

Data quality


Overall response rate was 42%. After data collection, non-response at both interview and item level were corrected through weighting factors when necessary. The fieldwork was closely monitored in order to maximize efficiency of the data collection and quality of the collected data. Interviews were taken at the respondent’s home through face-to-face interviews (CAPI).

Data quality


Overall response rate was 42%. After data collection, non-response at both interview and item level were corrected through weighting factors when necessary. The fieldwork was closely monitored in order to maximize efficiency of the data collection and quality of the collected data. Interviews were taken at the respondent’s home through face-to-face interviews (CAPI).

Data quality


Overall response rate was 42%. After data collection, non-response at both interview and item level were corrected through weighting factors when necessary. The fieldwork was closely monitored in order to maximize efficiency of the data collection and quality of the collected data. Interviews were taken at the respondent’s home through face-to-face interviews (CAPI).


Applicability


The Belgian part of the GGS survey has been conducted in a scientifically sound way. The data are as representative as is feasible in survey research. Two weaknesses of the dataset for the JPI project can be distinguished: (1) The institutionalized elderly are not included. (2) Individuals older than 80 are not included in the survey population.

Applicability


The Belgian part of the GGS survey has been conducted in a scientifically sound way. Two weaknesses of the dataset for the JPI project can be distinguished: (1) The institutionalized elderly are not included. (2) Individuals older than 80 are not included in the survey population.

Applicability


The Belgian part of the GGS survey has been conducted in a scientifically sound way. Two weaknesses of the dataset for the JPI project can be distinguished: (1) The institutionalized elderly are not included. (2) Individuals older than 80 are not included in the survey population.

Applicability


The Belgian part of the GGS survey has been conducted in a scientifically sound way. Two weaknesses of the dataset for the JPI project can be distinguished: (1) The institutionalized elderly are not included. (2) Individuals older than 80 are not included in the survey population.

Applicability


The Belgian part of the GGS survey has been conducted in a scientifically sound way. Two weaknesses of the dataset for the JPI project can be distinguished: (1) The institutionalized elderly are not included. (2) Individuals older than 80 are not included in the survey population.

Applicability


The Belgian part of the GGS survey has been conducted in a scientifically sound way. The data are as representative as is feasible in survey research. Two weaknesses of the dataset for the JPI project can be distinguished: (1) The institutionalized elderly are not included. (2) Individuals older than 80 are not included in the survey population.

Applicability


The Belgian part of the GGS survey has been conducted in a scientifically sound way. Two weaknesses of the dataset for the JPI project can be distinguished: (1) The institutionalized elderly are not included. (2) Individuals older than 80 are not included in the survey population.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Hans Peeters
  • (see Partners)