Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

SATSA - Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging
SATSA

Topic
Health and Performance
Relevance for this Topic
Country Sweden
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Nancy Pedersen / MEB - Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Anna Dahl, Institutet för gerontologi, Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping
Karolinska Institutet
171 77 Stockholm
Sweden
Phone: +46 8 524 87418
Fax: +46-8-31 49 75
Email: Nancy.Pedersen(at)ki.se
Url: ki.se/ki/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=13903&a=30148&l=en

Timeliness, transparency

Depends on type of study (contact principal investigator).

Type of data


Registry

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Registries


biomed samples – see above


Access to data


Available for the scientific community primarily by downloaded files in various applications (see below)

Conditions of access


Because the STR is an (inter)national resource, we are receptive to collaboration academic and industry-based researchers. Regardless of the type of research all potential collaborations or data access agreements must be first reviewed Steering Committee of the STR (Swedish Twin Registry). If the applicant is not based at a Swedish university, we require that s/he has a collaborator based at a Swedish university. This is to assure that the Swedish research community benefits from their national resource. After approval by the STR steering committee, a contract will be drawn up, and data provided after a payment agreement is arranged.


Varies depending on type of request; between two and four months.


Types of requests for access include: 1. aggregated summary tables or statistics from the STR 2. anonymized files of raw and/or transformed data from the STR 3. above data plus linkages to health registries 4. access to identifying information for further collection of new data


Dataset is compatible to many applications as, Excel, SAS, SPSS, STATA, Text, etc.


See http://ki.se/ki/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=13903&a=30148&l=en


Coverage


SATSA was started in 1984 and is comprised of several longitudinal components. To begin with, a comprehensive questionnaire was sent to all twins in the Swedish Twin Registry who were separated at an early age and reared apart, and a control sample of twins reared together. The questionnaires include items concerning rearing, family, adult, and working environment, health status, health related behaviors (e.g. alcohol, tobacco, and dietary habits), as well as relationships and personality measures. The questionnaires were sent again at 3-year intervals in 1987, 1990, 1993 and after a break again in 2004, 2007, and 2010. Thus, far more than 2,000 twins have responded to at least one of the seven questionnaire assessments conducted between 1984 and 2010. Additionally, there is information about midlife lifestyle factors from the Swedish Twin Registry that were collected about twenty years before SATSA started. In the second component, a subsample of 861 individuals have participated in at least one wave of in-person testing (IPT). The first IPT started in 1986 and since then, eight IPTs have been collected and the last wave will be collected during 2012-2013. The IPT includes a health examination, structured interviews, tests of functional capacity, and memory and thinking abilities. To date, over 76% of the sample has participated in 3 or more measurement waves. For IPT9, a third component was added to SATSA, a measure of day-to-day fluctuations in memory and thinking abilities, and emotions. Information about social interactions is also collected. After the visit by the research nurses, the twins fill out the day-to-day booklet during the next five days. This procedure will be repeated in IPT10. This will add information about small and short-term changes and more changes are supposed to indicate the beginning of poor health.


1984


Whole country


Swedish Twin Registry, Official Statistics


All of Sweden


Life-course approach - no age restrictions


selection from Twin Registry


Data from SATSA can be used to study various aspects of ageing. For example, the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors for individual differences in ageing, especially in cognitive and physical domains has been studied. A further main focus is to study changes within and across domains and which genetic and life style factors predict these changes. Given the wide spectrum of data from measured genes to social relationships collected over more than two decades, we dare to say that SATSA is a unique study, with the possibility to answer many questions within gerontology and geriatrics.


• Finkel, D., Pedersen, N. L., Reynolds, C. A., et al. “Genetic and environmental influences on decline in biobehavioral markers of aging.” Behavior Genetics 33(2) (2003): 107-123. • Jansson, M., Gatz, M., Berg, S., et al. “Association Between Depressed Mood in the Elderly and a 5-HTR2A Gene Variant.” American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B(Neuropsychiatric Genetics) 120 B (2003): 79-84. • Finkel, D., & Pedersen, N. L. “Processing Speed and Longitudinal Trajectories of Change for Cognitive Abilities: The Swedish Adoption / Twin Study of Aging.” Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition 11(2-3) (2004): 325-345. • Reynolds, C. A., Finkel, D., McArdle, J. J., et al. “Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Latent Growth Curve Models of Cognitive Abilities in Adulthood.” Developmental Psychology 41(1) (2005): 3-16. • Reynolds, C., Prince, J. A., Feuk, L., et al. “Longitudinal memory performance during normal aging: twin association models of APOE and other Alzheimer candidate genes.” Behavior Genetics 36(2) (2006): 185-194. • Dahl, A., Hassing, L.B., Fransson, E., et al. “Body Mass Index across midlife and cognitive change in late life.” Int J Obes 37(2) (2012): 296-302. • Finkel, D., Reynolds, C. A., McArdle, J. J., et al. “Genetic variance in processing speed drives variation in aging of spatial and memory abilities.” Developmental Psychology 45(3) (2009): 820-834. • Finkel, D., Reynolds, C. A., Larsson, M., et al. “Both odor identification and ApoE-epsilon4 contribute to normative cognitive aging.” Psychol Aging 26(4) (2011): 872-883. • Reynolds, C. A., Gatz, M., Berg, S., & Pedersen, N. L. “Genotype--environment interactions: Cognitive aging and social factors.” Twin Research and Human Genetics 10(2) (2007): 241-254. • Reynolds, C.A., Gatz, M., Prince, J.A., Berg, S., Pedersen, N.L.. “Serum lipid levels and cognitive change in late life.” J Am Geriatr Soc58(3) (2010): 501-509. • Sim, S. C., Nordin, L., Andersson, T. M., et al. “Association between CYP2C19 polymorphism and depressive symptoms.” Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 153B (2010): 1160-1166. • Svedberg, P., Gatz, M., & Pedersen, N. L. “Genetic and environmental mediation of the associations between self-rated health and cognitive abilities.” Exp Aging Res 35(2) (2009): 178-201.


Linkage


ISCED and IDC.


The research group collaborates with researchers at the University of Southern California, University of California - Riverside and Indiana University Southeast.


Data quality


SATSA is built on the Swedish Twin Register (STR)


No major methodological breaks.


High level of consistency over the project period.


Applicability


The Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA) provides a unique opportunity to understand individual differences in ageing. The twin design and the inclusion of twins reared apart makes it possible to study the importance of genetic and environmental factors that may underlie differing ageing outcomes. Further, the broad spectrum of biological, psychological, and social domains assessed across the life span makes it possible to study patterns of change within and across domains and how these predict health and diseases of ageing. Data from SATSA can be used to study various aspects of aging. For example, the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors for individual differences in aging especially in cognitive and physical domains has been studied. A further main focus is to study changes within and across domains and which genetic and life style factors predict these changes. Given the wide spectrum of data from measured genes to social relationships collected over more than two decades we dare to say that SATSA is a unique study, with the possibility to answer many questions within gerontology and geriatrics.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Kenneth Abrahamsson
  • (see Partners)