Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA)
English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA)

Topic
Wellbeing
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Work and Productivity
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Intergenerational Relationships
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Nina Rogers/Dept. of Epidemiology & Public Health
University College London
1-19 Torrington Place
WC1E 6BT London
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0)20 7679 1656
Email: n.rogers(at)public-health.ucl.ac.uk
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/
See also: http://www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA

Timeliness, transparency

Data are available about 6 months after end of fieldwork.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Clinical measurements; Physical measurements Performance measurements, such as the timed walk, were conducted, and Waves 2 and 4 included a nurse visit.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Clinical measurements; Physical measurements Performance measurements, such as the timed walk, were conducted, and Waves 2 and 4 included a nurse visit.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Clinical measurements; Physical measurements Performance measurements, such as the timed walk, were conducted, and Waves 2 and 4 included a nurse visit.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Clinical measurements; Physical measurements Performance measurements, such as the timed walk, were conducted, and Waves 2 and 4 included a nurse visit.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Clinical measurements; Physical measurements Performance measurements, such as the timed walk, were conducted, and Waves 2 and 4 included a nurse visit.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Clinical measurements; Physical measurements Performance measurements, such as the timed walk, were conducted, and Waves 2 and 4 included a nurse visit.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Self-completion; Clinical measurements; Physical measurements Performance measurements, such as the timed walk, were conducted, and Waves 2 and 4 included a nurse visit.


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk At present the ELSA team are not depositing any variables that allow analysis by or on spatial units. However, in certain circumstances these data can be provided to researchers who want to use it. Details of how to obtain access to these data are given in the User Guide for Geographical Variables, in the documentation.

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk At present the ELSA team are not depositing any variables that allow analysis by or on spatial units. However, in certain circumstances these data can be provided to researchers who want to use it. Details of how to obtain access to these data are given in the User Guide for Geographical Variables, in the documentation.

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk At present the ELSA team are not depositing any variables that allow analysis by or on spatial units. However, in certain circumstances these data can be provided to researchers who want to use it. Details of how to obtain access to these data are given in the User Guide for Geographical Variables, in the documentation.

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk At present the ELSA team are not depositing any variables that allow analysis by or on spatial units. However, in certain circumstances these data can be provided to researchers who want to use it. Details of how to obtain access to these data are given in the User Guide for Geographical Variables, in the documentation.

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk At present the ELSA team are not depositing any variables that allow analysis by or on spatial units. However, in certain circumstances these data can be provided to researchers who want to use it. Details of how to obtain access to these data are given in the User Guide for Geographical Variables, in the documentation.

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk At present the ELSA team are not depositing any variables that allow analysis by or on spatial units. However, in certain circumstances these data can be provided to researchers who want to use it. Details of how to obtain access to these data are given in the User Guide for Geographical Variables, in the documentation.

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk At present the ELSA team are not depositing any variables that allow analysis by or on spatial units. However, in certain circumstances these data can be provided to researchers who want to use it. Details of how to obtain access to these data are given in the User Guide for Geographical Variables, in the documentation.

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The ELSA sample was selected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) 1998, 1999 and 2001 respondents. Households were included in ELSA if they contained at least one adult of 50 years or older in the household who had agreed to be re-contacted at some time in the future when participating in the HSE. To ensure that ELSA remained representative of the target population, 'refreshment' samples were included at Waves 3, 4 and 6. These samples were again selected from HSE and included: • a sample of respondents to HSE 2001-04 from households with at least one adult aged 50-52 years (added at ELSA Wave 3); • a sample of respondents to HSE 2006 from households with at least one adult aged 50-74 years (added at ELSA Wave 4); and • a sample of respondents to HSE 2009-11 from households with at least one adult aged 50-55 years (added at ELSA Wave 6). Survey dates: Wave 1: March 2002 - March 2003; Wave 2: June 2004 - July 2005; Wave 3: May 2006 - August 2007; Wave 4: May 2008 - July 2009; Wave 5: June 2010 - July 2012. Core data: Wave 1: 12,100 cases. Wave 2: 9,433 cases. Wave 3: 9,771 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 4: 11,050 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 5: 10,274 cases.


1998-2001


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


England


Adults aged 50+


Representative of the (private) household population in England The data include weighting variables


The ELSA study is a longitudinal survey of ageing and quality of life among older people that explores the dynamic relationships between health and functioning, social networks and participation, and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. The main objectives of ELSA are to: • construct six waves of accessible and well-documented panel data; • provide these data in a convenient and timely fashion to the scientific and policy research community; • describe health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and over; • examine the relationship between economic position and health; • investigate the determinants of economic position in older age; • describe the timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; and • understand the relationships between social support, household structure and the transfer of assets.


Further publications relating to ELSA may be found on the Institute for Fiscal Studies ELSA website. • Attanasio, O., et al. “Pensions, pensioners and pension policy: financial security in UK retirement savings?” IFS briefing note 48, prepared for the ESRC seminar series “Mapping the Policy Landscape” (2004). • Banks, J., Emmerson, E., & Oldfield, Z. “Not so brief lives: longevity expectations and well-being in retirement.” In Stewart, I. & Vaitilingam, R. (eds.) “Seven ages of man and woman: a look at life in Britain in the second Elizabethan era” ESRC, London (2004): 28-31. • Banks, J., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. “'Childhood health and differences in late-life health outcomes between England and the United States”. In Wise, D. “Investigations in the Economics of Aging” University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2012): 321-339. See abstract at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/5762
• Calderwood, L., Cheshire, H., Conway, L., et al. “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing: technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London. 2005. • Marmot, M., Banks, J., Blundell, R., Lessof, C., & Nazroo, J. (eds.). “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.” Institute for Fiscal Studies London, 2002. ISBN: 1-903274-34-6. • Steptoe, A., Breeze, E., Banks, J., & Nazroo, J. “Cohort profile: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing”. International Journal of Epidemiology (2012): 1-9. Available at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/6461
.

Coverage


The ELSA sample was selected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) 1998, 1999 and 2001 respondents. Households were included in ELSA if they contained at least one adult of 50 years or older in the household who had agreed to be re-contacted at some time in the future when participating in the HSE. To ensure that ELSA remained representative of the target population, 'refreshment' samples were included at Waves 3, 4 and 6. These samples were again selected from HSE and included: • a sample of respondents to HSE 2001-04 from households with at least one adult aged 50-52 years (added at ELSA Wave 3); • a sample of respondents to HSE 2006 from households with at least one adult aged 50-74 years (added at ELSA Wave 4); and • a sample of respondents to HSE 2009-11 from households with at least one adult aged 50-55 years (added at ELSA Wave 6). Survey dates: Wave 1: March 2002 - March 2003; Wave 2: June 2004 - July 2005; Wave 3: May 2006 - August 2007; Wave 4: May 2008 - July 2009; Wave 5: June 2010 - July 2012. Core data: Wave 1: 12,100 cases. Wave 2: 9,433 cases. Wave 3: 9,771 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 4: 11,050 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 5: 10,274 cases.


1998-2001


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


England


Adults aged 50+


Representative of the (private) household population in England The data include weighting variables


The ELSA study is a longitudinal survey of ageing and quality of life among older people that explores the dynamic relationships between health and functioning, social networks and participation, and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. The main objectives of ELSA are to: • construct six waves of accessible and well-documented panel data; • provide these data in a convenient and timely fashion to the scientific and policy research community; • describe health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and over; • examine the relationship between economic position and health; • investigate the determinants of economic position in older age; • describe the timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; and • understand the relationships between social support, household structure and the transfer of assets.


Further publications relating to ELSA may be found on the Institute for Fiscal Studies ELSA website. • Attanasio, O., et al. “Pensions, pensioners and pension policy: financial security in UK retirement savings?” IFS briefing note 48, prepared for the ESRC seminar series “Mapping the Policy Landscape” (2004). • Banks, J., Emmerson, E., & Oldfield, Z. “Not so brief lives: longevity expectations and well-being in retirement.” In Stewart, I. & Vaitilingam, R. (eds.) “Seven ages of man and woman: a look at life in Britain in the second Elizabethan era” ESRC, London (2004): 28-31. • Banks, J., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. “'Childhood health and differences in late-life health outcomes between England and the United States”. In Wise, D. “Investigations in the Economics of Aging” University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2012): 321-339. See abstract at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/5762
• Calderwood, L., Cheshire, H., Conway, L., et al. “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing: technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London. 2005. • Marmot, M., Banks, J., Blundell, R., Lessof, C., & Nazroo, J. (eds.). “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.” Institute for Fiscal Studies London, 2002. ISBN: 1-903274-34-6. • Steptoe, A., Breeze, E., Banks, J., & Nazroo, J. “Cohort profile: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing”. International Journal of Epidemiology (2012): 1-9. Available at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/6461

Coverage


The ELSA sample was selected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) 1998, 1999 and 2001 respondents. Households were included in ELSA if they contained at least one adult of 50 years or older in the household who had agreed to be re-contacted at some time in the future when participating in the HSE. To ensure that ELSA remained representative of the target population, 'refreshment' samples were included at Waves 3, 4 and 6. These samples were again selected from HSE and included: • a sample of respondents to HSE 2001-04 from households with at least one adult aged 50-52 years (added at ELSA Wave 3); • a sample of respondents to HSE 2006 from households with at least one adult aged 50-74 years (added at ELSA Wave 4); and • a sample of respondents to HSE 2009-11 from households with at least one adult aged 50-55 years (added at ELSA Wave 6). Survey dates: Wave 1: March 2002 - March 2003; Wave 2: June 2004 - July 2005; Wave 3: May 2006 - August 2007; Wave 4: May 2008 - July 2009; Wave 5: June 2010 - July 2012. Core data: Wave 1: 12,100 cases. Wave 2: 9,433 cases. Wave 3: 9,771 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 4: 11,050 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 5: 10,274 cases.


1998-2001


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


England


Adults aged 50+


Representative of the (private) household population in England The data include weighting variables


The ELSA study is a longitudinal survey of ageing and quality of life among older people that explores the dynamic relationships between health and functioning, social networks and participation, and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. The main objectives of ELSA are to: • construct six waves of accessible and well-documented panel data; • provide these data in a convenient and timely fashion to the scientific and policy research community; • describe health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and over; • examine the relationship between economic position and health; • investigate the determinants of economic position in older age; • describe the timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; and • understand the relationships between social support, household structure and the transfer of assets.


Further publications relating to ELSA may be found on the Institute for Fiscal Studies ELSA website. • Attanasio, O., et al. “Pensions, pensioners and pension policy: financial security in UK retirement savings?” IFS briefing note 48, prepared for the ESRC seminar series “Mapping the Policy Landscape” (2004). • Banks, J., Emmerson, E., & Oldfield, Z. “Not so brief lives: longevity expectations and well-being in retirement.” In Stewart, I. & Vaitilingam, R. (eds.) “Seven ages of man and woman: a look at life in Britain in the second Elizabethan era” ESRC, London (2004): 28-31. • Banks, J., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. “'Childhood health and differences in late-life health outcomes between England and the United States”. In Wise, D. “Investigations in the Economics of Aging” University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2012): 321-339. See abstract at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/5762
• Calderwood, L., Cheshire, H., Conway, L., et al. “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing: technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London. 2005. • Marmot, M., Banks, J., Blundell, R., Lessof, C., & Nazroo, J. (eds.). “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.” Institute for Fiscal Studies London, 2002. ISBN: 1-903274-34-6. • Steptoe, A., Breeze, E., Banks, J., & Nazroo, J. “Cohort profile: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing”. International Journal of Epidemiology (2012): 1-9. Available at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/6461

Coverage


The ELSA sample was selected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) 1998, 1999 and 2001 respondents. Households were included in ELSA if they contained at least one adult of 50 years or older in the household who had agreed to be re-contacted at some time in the future when participating in the HSE. To ensure that ELSA remained representative of the target population, 'refreshment' samples were included at Waves 3, 4 and 6. These samples were again selected from HSE and included: • a sample of respondents to HSE 2001-04 from households with at least one adult aged 50-52 years (added at ELSA Wave 3); • a sample of respondents to HSE 2006 from households with at least one adult aged 50-74 years (added at ELSA Wave 4); and • a sample of respondents to HSE 2009-11 from households with at least one adult aged 50-55 years (added at ELSA Wave 6). Survey dates: Wave 1: March 2002 - March 2003; Wave 2: June 2004 - July 2005; Wave 3: May 2006 - August 2007; Wave 4: May 2008 - July 2009; Wave 5: June 2010 - July 2012. Core data: Wave 1: 12,100 cases. Wave 2: 9,433 cases. Wave 3: 9,771 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 4: 11,050 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 5: 10,274 cases.


1998-2001


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


England


Adults aged 50+


Representative of the (private) household population in England The data include weighting variables


The ELSA study is a longitudinal survey of ageing and quality of life among older people that explores the dynamic relationships between health and functioning, social networks and participation, and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. The main objectives of ELSA are to: • construct six waves of accessible and well-documented panel data; • provide these data in a convenient and timely fashion to the scientific and policy research community; • describe health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and over; • examine the relationship between economic position and health; • investigate the determinants of economic position in older age; • describe the timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; and • understand the relationships between social support, household structure and the transfer of assets.


Further publications relating to ELSA may be found on the Institute for Fiscal Studies ELSA website. • Attanasio, O., et al. “Pensions, pensioners and pension policy: financial security in UK retirement savings?” IFS briefing note 48, prepared for the ESRC seminar series “Mapping the Policy Landscape” (2004). • Banks, J., Emmerson, E., & Oldfield, Z. “Not so brief lives: longevity expectations and well-being in retirement.” In Stewart, I. & Vaitilingam, R. (eds.) “Seven ages of man and woman: a look at life in Britain in the second Elizabethan era” ESRC, London (2004): 28-31. • Banks, J., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. “'Childhood health and differences in late-life health outcomes between England and the United States”. In Wise, D. “Investigations in the Economics of Aging” University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2012): 321-339. See abstract at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/5762
• Calderwood, L., Cheshire, H., Conway, L., et al. “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing: technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London. 2005. • Marmot, M., Banks, J., Blundell, R., Lessof, C., & Nazroo, J. (eds.). “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.” Institute for Fiscal Studies London, 2002. ISBN: 1-903274-34-6. • Steptoe, A., Breeze, E., Banks, J., & Nazroo, J. “Cohort profile: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing”. International Journal of Epidemiology (2012): 1-9. Available at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/6461
.

Coverage


The ELSA sample was selected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) 1998, 1999 and 2001 respondents. Households were included in ELSA if they contained at least one adult of 50 years or older in the household who had agreed to be re-contacted at some time in the future when participating in the HSE. To ensure that ELSA remained representative of the target population, 'refreshment' samples were included at Waves 3, 4 and 6. These samples were again selected from HSE and included: • a sample of respondents to HSE 2001-04 from households with at least one adult aged 50-52 years (added at ELSA Wave 3); • a sample of respondents to HSE 2006 from households with at least one adult aged 50-74 years (added at ELSA Wave 4); and • a sample of respondents to HSE 2009-11 from households with at least one adult aged 50-55 years (added at ELSA Wave 6). Survey dates: Wave 1: March 2002 - March 2003; Wave 2: June 2004 - July 2005; Wave 3: May 2006 - August 2007; Wave 4: May 2008 - July 2009; Wave 5: June 2010 - July 2012. Core data: Wave 1: 12,100 cases. Wave 2: 9,433 cases. Wave 3: 9,771 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 4: 11,050 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 5: 10,274 cases.


1998-2001


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


England


Adults aged 50+


Representative of the (private) household population in England The data include weighting variables


The ELSA study is a longitudinal survey of ageing and quality of life among older people that explores the dynamic relationships between health and functioning, social networks and participation, and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. The main objectives of ELSA are to: • construct six waves of accessible and well-documented panel data; • provide these data in a convenient and timely fashion to the scientific and policy research community; • describe health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and over; • examine the relationship between economic position and health; • investigate the determinants of economic position in older age; • describe the timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; and • understand the relationships between social support, household structure and the transfer of assets.


Further publications relating to ELSA may be found on the Institute for Fiscal Studies ELSA website. • Attanasio, O., et al. “Pensions, pensioners and pension policy: financial security in UK retirement savings?” IFS briefing note 48, prepared for the ESRC seminar series “Mapping the Policy Landscape” (2004). • Banks, J., Emmerson, E., & Oldfield, Z. “Not so brief lives: longevity expectations and well-being in retirement.” In Stewart, I. & Vaitilingam, R. (eds.) “Seven ages of man and woman: a look at life in Britain in the second Elizabethan era” ESRC, London (2004): 28-31. • Banks, J., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. “'Childhood health and differences in late-life health outcomes between England and the United States”. In Wise, D. “Investigations in the Economics of Aging” University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2012): 321-339. See abstract at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/5762
• Calderwood, L., Cheshire, H., Conway, L., et al. “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing: technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London. 2005. • Marmot, M., Banks, J., Blundell, R., Lessof, C., & Nazroo, J. (eds.). “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.” Institute for Fiscal Studies London, 2002. ISBN: 1-903274-34-6. • Steptoe, A., Breeze, E., Banks, J., & Nazroo, J. “Cohort profile: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing”. International Journal of Epidemiology (2012): 1-9. Available at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/6461
.

Coverage


The ELSA sample was selected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) 1998, 1999 and 2001 respondents. Households were included in ELSA if they contained at least one adult of 50 years or older in the household who had agreed to be re-contacted at some time in the future when participating in the HSE. To ensure that ELSA remained representative of the target population, 'refreshment' samples were included at Waves 3, 4 and 6. These samples were again selected from HSE and included: • a sample of respondents to HSE 2001-04 from households with at least one adult aged 50-52 years (added at ELSA Wave 3); • a sample of respondents to HSE 2006 from households with at least one adult aged 50-74 years (added at ELSA Wave 4); and • a sample of respondents to HSE 2009-11 from households with at least one adult aged 50-55 years (added at ELSA Wave 6). Survey dates: Wave 1: March 2002 - March 2003; Wave 2: June 2004 - July 2005; Wave 3: May 2006 - August 2007; Wave 4: May 2008 - July 2009; Wave 5: June 2010 - July 2012. Core data: Wave 1: 12,100 cases. Wave 2: 9,433 cases. Wave 3: 9,771 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 4: 11,050 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 5: 10,274 cases.


1998-2001


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


England


Adults aged 50+


Representative of the (private) household population in England The data include weighting variables


The ELSA study is a longitudinal survey of ageing and quality of life among older people that explores the dynamic relationships between health and functioning, social networks and participation, and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. The main objectives of ELSA are to: • construct six waves of accessible and well-documented panel data; • provide these data in a convenient and timely fashion to the scientific and policy research community; • describe health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and over; • examine the relationship between economic position and health; • investigate the determinants of economic position in older age; • describe the timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; and • understand the relationships between social support, household structure and the transfer of assets.


Further publications relating to ELSA may be found on the Institute for Fiscal Studies ELSA website. • Attanasio, O., et al. “Pensions, pensioners and pension policy: financial security in UK retirement savings?” IFS briefing note 48, prepared for the ESRC seminar series “Mapping the Policy Landscape” (2004). • Banks, J., Emmerson, E., & Oldfield, Z. “Not so brief lives: longevity expectations and well-being in retirement.” In Stewart, I. & Vaitilingam, R. (eds.) “Seven ages of man and woman: a look at life in Britain in the second Elizabethan era” ESRC, London (2004): 28-31. • Banks, J., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. “'Childhood health and differences in late-life health outcomes between England and the United States”. In Wise, D. “Investigations in the Economics of Aging” University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2012): 321-339. See abstract at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/5762
• Calderwood, L., Cheshire, H., Conway, L., et al. “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing: technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London. 2005. • Marmot, M., Banks, J., Blundell, R., Lessof, C., & Nazroo, J. (eds.). “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.” Institute for Fiscal Studies London, 2002. ISBN: 1-903274-34-6. • Steptoe, A., Breeze, E., Banks, J., & Nazroo, J. “Cohort profile: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing”. International Journal of Epidemiology (2012): 1-9. Available at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/6461
.

Coverage


The ELSA sample was selected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) 1998, 1999 and 2001 respondents. Households were included in ELSA if they contained at least one adult of 50 years or older in the household who had agreed to be re-contacted at some time in the future when participating in the HSE. To ensure that ELSA remained representative of the target population, 'refreshment' samples were included at Waves 3, 4 and 6. These samples were again selected from HSE and included: • a sample of respondents to HSE 2001-04 from households with at least one adult aged 50-52 years (added at ELSA Wave 3); • a sample of respondents to HSE 2006 from households with at least one adult aged 50-74 years (added at ELSA Wave 4); and • a sample of respondents to HSE 2009-11 from households with at least one adult aged 50-55 years (added at ELSA Wave 6). Survey dates: Wave 1: March 2002 - March 2003; Wave 2: June 2004 - July 2005; Wave 3: May 2006 - August 2007; Wave 4: May 2008 - July 2009; Wave 5: June 2010 - July 2012. Core data: Wave 1: 12,100 cases. Wave 2: 9,433 cases. Wave 3: 9,771 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 4: 11,050 cases (Phase 2 deposit). Wave 5: 10,274 cases.


1998-2001


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


England


Adults aged 50+


Representative of the (private) household population in England The data include weighting variables


The ELSA study is a longitudinal survey of ageing and quality of life among older people that explores the dynamic relationships between health and functioning, social networks and participation, and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. The main objectives of ELSA are to: • construct six waves of accessible and well-documented panel data; • provide these data in a convenient and timely fashion to the scientific and policy research community; • describe health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and over; • examine the relationship between economic position and health; • investigate the determinants of economic position in older age; • describe the timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; and • understand the relationships between social support, household structure and the transfer of assets.


Further publications relating to ELSA may be found on the Institute for Fiscal Studies ELSA website. • Attanasio, O., et al. “Pensions, pensioners and pension policy: financial security in UK retirement savings?” IFS briefing note 48, prepared for the ESRC seminar series “Mapping the Policy Landscape” (2004). • Banks, J., Emmerson, E., & Oldfield, Z. “Not so brief lives: longevity expectations and well-being in retirement.” In Stewart, I. & Vaitilingam, R. (eds.) “Seven ages of man and woman: a look at life in Britain in the second Elizabethan era” ESRC, London (2004): 28-31. • Banks, J., Oldfield, Z., & Smith, J. “'Childhood health and differences in late-life health outcomes between England and the United States”. In Wise, D. “Investigations in the Economics of Aging” University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2012): 321-339. See abstract at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/5762
• Calderwood, L., Cheshire, H., Conway, L., et al. “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing: technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London. 2005. • Marmot, M., Banks, J., Blundell, R., Lessof, C., & Nazroo, J. (eds.). “Health, wealth and lifestyles of the older population in England: the 2002 English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.” Institute for Fiscal Studies London, 2002. ISBN: 1-903274-34-6. • Steptoe, A., Breeze, E., Banks, J., & Nazroo, J. “Cohort profile: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing”. International Journal of Epidemiology (2012): 1-9. Available at www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA/publicationDetails/id/6461
.


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Additionally, this survey uses a number of harmonised health measures: • Rose Angina Questionnaire • Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire • MRCQ (Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire) • CES-D Depression Scale (8-item) • General Health Questionnaire (12-item) • CASP-19 (Control Autonomy Pleasure Self-realization – 19 questions) is a quality-of-life measure comprising four domains ('control', 'autonomy', 'pleasure' and 'self-realization') • Ryff Scale of Psychological Wellbeing


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Additionally, this survey uses a number of harmonised health measures: • Rose Angina Questionnaire • Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire • MRCQ (Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire) • CES-D Depression Scale (8-item) • General Health Questionnaire (12-item) • CASP-19 (Control Autonomy Pleasure Self-realization – 19 questions) is a quality-of-life measure comprising four domains ('control', 'autonomy', 'pleasure' and 'self-realization') • Ryff Scale of Psychological Wellbeing


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Additionally, this survey uses a number of harmonised health measures: • Rose Angina Questionnaire • Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire • MRCQ (Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire) • CES-D Depression Scale (8-item) • General Health Questionnaire (12-item) • CASP-19 (Control Autonomy Pleasure Self-realization – 19 questions) is a quality-of-life measure comprising four domains ('control', 'autonomy', 'pleasure' and 'self-realization') • Ryff Scale of Psychological Wellbeing


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Additionally, this survey uses a number of harmonised health measures: • Rose Angina Questionnaire • Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire • MRCQ (Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire) • CES-D Depression Scale (8-item) • General Health Questionnaire (12-item) • CASP-19 (Control Autonomy Pleasure Self-realization – 19 questions) is a quality-of-life measure comprising four domains ('control', 'autonomy', 'pleasure' and 'self-realization') • Ryff Scale of Psychological Wellbeing


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Additionally, this survey uses a number of harmonised health measures: • Rose Angina Questionnaire • Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire • MRC (Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire) • CES-D Depression Scale (8-item) • General Health Questionnaire (12-item) • CASP-19 (Control Autonomy Pleasure Self-realization – 19 questions) is a quality-of-life measure comprising four domains ('control', 'autonomy', 'pleasure' and 'self-realization') • Ryff Scale of Psychological Wellbeing


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Additionally, this survey uses a number of harmonised health measures: • Rose Angina Questionnaire • Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire • MRCQ (Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire) • CES-D Depression Scale (8-item) • General Health Questionnaire (12-item) • CASP-19 (Control Autonomy Pleasure Self-realization – 19 questions) is a quality-of-life measure comprising four domains ('control', 'autonomy', 'pleasure' and 'self-realization') • Ryff Scale of Psychological Wellbeing


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Additionally, this survey uses a number of harmonised health measures: • Rose Angina Questionnaire • Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire • MRCQ (Medical Research Council Respiratory Questionnaire) • CES-D Depression Scale (8-item) • General Health Questionnaire (12-item) • CASP-19 (Control Autonomy Pleasure Self-realization – 19 questions) is a quality-of-life measure comprising four domains ('control', 'autonomy', 'pleasure' and 'self-realization') • Ryff Scale of Psychological Wellbeing


Data are anonymised


Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. There are also incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is very good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. There are also incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is very good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. There are also incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is very good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. There are also incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is very good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. There are also incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is very good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. There are also incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is very good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. There are also incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is very good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


• A longitudinal study able to investigate trends and intra-household variables. • Long-run data available for retrospective information on earlier life. • ELSA is modelled on a similar study in the US (the Health and Retirement Study)

Applicability


• A longitudinal study able to investigate trends and intra-household variables. • Long-run data available for retrospective information on earlier life. • ELSA is modelled on a similar study in the US (the Health and Retirement Study)

Applicability


• A longitudinal study able to investigate trends and intra-household variables. • Long-run data available for retrospective information on earlier life. • ELSA is modelled on a similar study in the US (the Health and Retirement Study)

Applicability


• A longitudinal study able to investigate trends and intra-household variables. • Long-run data available for retrospective information on earlier life. • ELSA is modelled on a similar study in the US (the Health and Retirement Study)

Applicability


• A longitudinal study able to investigate trends and intra-household variables. • Long-run data available for retrospective information on earlier life. • ELSA is modelled on a similar study in the US (the Health and Retirement Study)

Applicability


• A longitudinal study able to investigate trends and intra-household variables. • Long-run data available for retrospective information on earlier life. • ELSA is modelled on a similar study in the US (the Health and Retirement Study)

Applicability


• A longitudinal study able to investigate trends and intra-household variables. • Long-run data available for retrospective information on earlier life. • ELSA is modelled on a similar study in the US (the Health and Retirement Study)


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Mike Murphy
  • (see Partners)