Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs)
Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs)

Topic
Education and Learning
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Work and Productivity
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Intergenerational Relationships
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Office for National Statistics
Customer Contact Centre
Government Buildings, Cardiff Road
NP10 8XG Newport, South Wales
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1633 455678.
Email: info(at)statistics.gsi.gov.uk
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Timeliness, transparency

Timetables for the availability of census data vary by data type, and the SARs are not usually available until at least 24 months after each census.

Type of data


Other, please specify

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Based on self-completed Census data, where forms may be completed by any household member

Type of data


Other, please specify

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Based on self-completed Census data, where forms may be completed by any household member

Type of data


Other, please specify

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Based on self-completed Census data, where forms may be completed by any household member

Type of data


Other, please specify

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Based on self-completed Census data, where forms may be completed by any household member

Type of data


Other, please specify

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Based on self-completed Census data, where forms may be completed by any household member

Type of data


Other, please specify

Type of Study

Cross-section, occasional

Data gathering method

Self-administered questionnaire


Based on self-completed Census data, where forms may be completed by any household member


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Special Licence Household SAR can also be obtained from the UK Data Service, although the catalogue record will direct you to the appropriate application form, rather than the data themselves. The Special Licence requires users to sign up to a much higher degree of data stewardship. Commercial users may apply to use these data for statistical analyses only. Commercial uses which are specifically barred by the licence include resale of data and the use of these data in direct marketing. This data file is not available to overseas users. Further information on Special Licence requirements can be found on the UK Data Service website. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx
A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all Office for National Statistics (ONS) sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales.


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Special Licence Household SAR can also be obtained from the UK Data Service, although the catalogue record will direct you to the appropriate application form, rather than the data themselves. The Special Licence requires users to sign up to a much higher degree of data stewardship. Commercial users may apply to use these data for statistical analyses only. Commercial uses which are specifically barred by the licence include resale of data and the use of these data in direct marketing. This data file is not available to overseas users. Further information on Special Licence requirements can be found on the UK Data Service website. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx
A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all Office for National Statistics (ONS) sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales.


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Special Licence Household SAR can also be obtained from the UK Data Service, although the catalogue record will direct you to the appropriate application form, rather than the data themselves. The Special Licence requires users to sign up to a much higher degree of data stewardship. Commercial users may apply to use these data for statistical analyses only. Commercial uses which are specifically barred by the licence include resale of data and the use of these data in direct marketing. This data file is not available to overseas users. Further information on Special Licence requirements can be found on the UK Data Service website. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx
A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all Office for National Statistics (ONS) sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales.


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Special Licence Household SAR can also be obtained from the UK Data Service, although the catalogue record will direct you to the appropriate application form, rather than the data themselves. The Special Licence requires users to sign up to a much higher degree of data stewardship. Commercial users may apply to use these data for statistical analyses only. Commercial uses which are specifically barred by the licence include resale of data and the use of these data in direct marketing. This data file is not available to overseas users. Further information on Special Licence requirements can be found on the UK Data Service website. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx
A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all Office for National Statistics (ONS) sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales.


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Special Licence Household SAR can also be obtained from the UK Data Service, although the catalogue record will direct you to the appropriate application form, rather than the data themselves. The Special Licence requires users to sign up to a much higher degree of data stewardship. Commercial users may apply to use these data for statistical analyses only. Commercial uses which are specifically barred by the licence include resale of data and the use of these data in direct marketing. This data file is not available to overseas users. Further information on Special Licence requirements can be found on the UK Data Service website. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx
A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all Office for National Statistics (ONS) sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales.


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Special Licence Household SAR can also be obtained from the UK Data Service, although the catalogue record will direct you to the appropriate application form, rather than the data themselves. The Special Licence requires users to sign up to a much higher degree of data stewardship. Commercial users may apply to use these data for statistical analyses only. Commercial uses which are specifically barred by the licence include resale of data and the use of these data in direct marketing. This data file is not available to overseas users. Further information on Special Licence requirements can be found on the UK Data Service website. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx
A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all Office for National Statistics (ONS) sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales.


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The SARs are a family of datasets drawn from the 1991 and 2001 UK Census. The SARs contain a separate record for each individual, but identifying information has been removed to protect confidentiality. The SARs datasets are similar to data from a survey, albeit with a much larger sample size thus permitting analysis of small sub-groups and small geographic levels. The SARs cover the full range of Census topics including, housing, education, health, transport, employment, ethnicity and religion. For the Census 2001, the Individual Licenced Sample of Anonymised Records (I-SAR) had a sample size of 1,843,525 cases. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2001, approximately one third of the total UK population was aged 50 and over.]


1991


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex.


Census data For example, the 2001 Individual Licensed SAR (I-SAR) was sampled from the One Number Census (ONC) database for the entire UK. Thus individuals and households imputed as part of the ONC are included in the SARs.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License.


All ages


The data are representative of the UK population that were enumerated by the census (including those living in Communal Establishments) Note: Some datasets do not cover all constituent countries The dataset does not include weighting variables


The Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs) are a family of datasets which are currently available from the 1991 and 2001 Censuses and will be available in due course from the 2011 Census. Each file is a sample of individual person-level records drawn from the census database that has been anonymised. Each file contains a broad range of socio-demographic characteristics for respondents, with a particular emphasis on either individual, household, or geographical detail. The SARs allow flexible, multivariate analysis at the individual level. They are a unique data source for the investigation of a range of social issues including household composition, ethnic differences, education and employment. The SARs differ from traditional Census outputs in that they are not aggregated into pre-determined tables.


A list of publications is maintained by the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research at the University of Manchester: www.ccsr.ac.uk/.../jointpub.html
Examples include: • Afkhami, R., & Tajar, A. “Ethno-religious groups and employment pattern in England and Wales using 2001 individual SARs.” Census Microdata: findings and futures (2008). • Al-Hamad, A., Hayes, L., & Flowerdew, R. “Migration of the Elderly to Join Existing Households: Evidence from the Household SAR.” Environment & Planning A 29(7) (1997): 1243-55. • Al-Hamad, A., Flowerdew, R., Hayes, L., et al., eds. “Migration of Elderly People to Join Existing Households: Some Evidence from the Household SARs.” Lancaster University, Lancaster, 1995. • Al-Rasheed, A. “The Other - Others: hidden Arabs?” In Peach, C. “Ethnicity in the 1991 Census. Volume 2: The ethnic minority populations of Great Britain.” HMSO, London (1996): 206-21. • Atkins, D. “What? Who? Where? When? and Why? - A Review of migration datasets.” (1994) • Bagguley, P., & Hussain, Y. “The Role of Higher Education in providing opportunities for Young South Asian Women Bristol.” The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Policy Press, Bristol, 2007. • Mitchell, R., Dujardin, C., Popham, F., et al. “Using matched areas to explore international differences in population health Social Science & Medicine.” Social Science and Medicine 73(8) (2011): 1113-1122

Coverage


The SARs are a family of datasets drawn from the 1991 and 2001 UK Census. The SARs contain a separate record for each individual, but identifying information has been removed to protect confidentiality. The SARs datasets are similar to data from a survey, albeit with a much larger sample size thus permitting analysis of small sub-groups and small geographic levels. The SARs cover the full range of Census topics including, housing, education, health, transport, employment, ethnicity and religion. For the Census 2001, the Individual Licenced Sample of Anonymised Records (I-SAR) had a sample size of 1,843,525 cases. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2001, approximately one third of the total UK population was aged 50 and over.]


1991


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex.


Census data For example, the 2001 Individual Licensed SAR (I-SAR) was sampled from the One Number Census (ONC) database for the entire UK. Thus individuals and households imputed as part of the ONC are included in the SARs.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License.


All ages


The data are representative of the UK population that were enumerated by the census (including those living in Communal Establishments) Note: Some datasets do not cover all constituent countries The dataset does not include weighting variables


The Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs) are a family of datasets which are currently available from the 1991 and 2001 Censuses and will be available in due course from the 2011 Census. Each file is a sample of individual person-level records drawn from the census database that has been anonymised. Each file contains a broad range of socio-demographic characteristics for respondents, with a particular emphasis on either individual, household, or geographical detail. The SARs allow flexible, multivariate analysis at the individual level. They are a unique data source for the investigation of a range of social issues including household composition, ethnic differences, education and employment. The SARs differ from traditional Census outputs in that they are not aggregated into pre-determined tables.


A list of publications is maintained by the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research at the University of Manchester: www.ccsr.ac.uk/.../jointpub.html
Examples include: • Afkhami, R., & Tajar, A. “Ethno-religious groups and employment pattern in England and Wales using 2001 individual SARs.” Census Microdata: findings and futures (2008). • Al-Hamad, A., Hayes, L., & Flowerdew, R. “Migration of the Elderly to Join Existing Households: Evidence from the Household SAR.” Environment & Planning A 29(7) (1997): 1243-55. • Al-Hamad, A., Flowerdew, R., Hayes, L., et al., eds. “Migration of Elderly People to Join Existing Households: Some Evidence from the Household SARs.” Lancaster University, Lancaster, 1995. • Al-Rasheed, A. “The Other - Others: hidden Arabs?” In Peach, C. “Ethnicity in the 1991 Census. Volume 2: The ethnic minority populations of Great Britain.” HMSO, London (1996): 206-21. • Atkins, D. “What? Who? Where? When? and Why? - A Review of migration datasets.” (1994) • Bagguley, P., & Hussain, Y. “The Role of Higher Education in providing opportunities for Young South Asian Women Bristol.” The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Policy Press, Bristol, 2007. • Mitchell, R., Dujardin, C., Popham, F., et al. “Using matched areas to explore international differences in population health Social Science & Medicine.” Social Science and Medicine 73(8) (2011): 1113-1122

Coverage


The SARs are a family of datasets drawn from the 1991 and 2001 UK Census. The SARs contain a separate record for each individual, but identifying information has been removed to protect confidentiality. The SARs datasets are similar to data from a survey, albeit with a much larger sample size thus permitting analysis of small sub-groups and small geographic levels. The SARs cover the full range of Census topics including, housing, education, health, transport, employment, ethnicity and religion. For the Census 2001, the Individual Licenced Sample of Anonymised Records (I-SAR) had a sample size of 1,843,525 cases. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2001, approximately one third of the total UK population was aged 50 and over.]


1991


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex.


Census data For example, the 2001 Individual Licensed SAR (I-SAR) was sampled from the One Number Census (ONC) database for the entire UK. Thus individuals and households imputed as part of the ONC are included in the SARs.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License.


All ages


The data are representative of the UK population that were enumerated by the census (including those living in Communal Establishments) Note: Some datasets do not cover all constituent countries The dataset does not include weighting variables


The Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs) are a family of datasets which are currently available from the 1991 and 2001 Censuses and will be available in due course from the 2011 Census. Each file is a sample of individual person-level records drawn from the census database that has been anonymised. Each file contains a broad range of socio-demographic characteristics for respondents, with a particular emphasis on either individual, household, or geographical detail. The SARs allow flexible, multivariate analysis at the individual level. They are a unique data source for the investigation of a range of social issues including household composition, ethnic differences, education and employment. The SARs differ from traditional Census outputs in that they are not aggregated into pre-determined tables.


A list of publications is maintained by the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research at the University of Manchester: www.ccsr.ac.uk/.../jointpub.html
Examples include: • Afkhami, R., & Tajar, A. “Ethno-religious groups and employment pattern in England and Wales using 2001 individual SARs.” Census Microdata: findings and futures (2008). • Al-Hamad, A., Hayes, L., & Flowerdew, R. “Migration of the Elderly to Join Existing Households: Evidence from the Household SAR.” Environment & Planning A 29(7) (1997): 1243-55. • Al-Hamad, A., Flowerdew, R., Hayes, L., et al., eds. “Migration of Elderly People to Join Existing Households: Some Evidence from the Household SARs.” Lancaster University, Lancaster, 1995. • Al-Rasheed, A. “The Other - Others: hidden Arabs?” In Peach, C. “Ethnicity in the 1991 Census. Volume 2: The ethnic minority populations of Great Britain.” HMSO, London (1996): 206-21. • Atkins, D. “What? Who? Where? When? and Why? - A Review of migration datasets.” (1994) • Bagguley, P., & Hussain, Y. “The Role of Higher Education in providing opportunities for Young South Asian Women Bristol.” The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Policy Press, Bristol, 2007. • Mitchell, R., Dujardin, C., Popham, F., et al. “Using matched areas to explore international differences in population health Social Science & Medicine.” Social Science and Medicine 73(8) (2011): 1113-1122.

Coverage


The SARs are a family of datasets drawn from the 1991 and 2001 UK Census. The SARs contain a separate record for each individual, but identifying information has been removed to protect confidentiality. The SARs datasets are similar to data from a survey, albeit with a much larger sample size thus permitting analysis of small sub-groups and small geographic levels. The SARs cover the full range of Census topics including, housing, education, health, transport, employment, ethnicity and religion. For the Census 2001, the Individual Licenced Sample of Anonymised Records (I-SAR) had a sample size of 1,843,525 cases. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2001, approximately one third of the total UK population was aged 50 and over.]


1991


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex.


Census data For example, the 2001 Individual Licensed SAR (I-SAR) was sampled from the One Number Census (ONC) database for the entire UK. Thus individuals and households imputed as part of the ONC are included in the SARs.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License.


All ages


The data are representative of the UK population that were enumerated by the census (including those living in Communal Establishments) Note: Some datasets do not cover all constituent countries The dataset does not include weighting variables


The Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs) are a family of datasets which are currently available from the 1991 and 2001 Censuses and will be available in due course from the 2011 Census. Each file is a sample of individual person-level records drawn from the census database that has been anonymised. Each file contains a broad range of socio-demographic characteristics for respondents, with a particular emphasis on either individual, household, or geographical detail. The SARs allow flexible, multivariate analysis at the individual level. They are a unique data source for the investigation of a range of social issues including household composition, ethnic differences, education and employment. The SARs differ from traditional Census outputs in that they are not aggregated into pre-determined tables.


A list of publications is maintained by the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research at the University of Manchester: www.ccsr.ac.uk/.../jointpub.html
Examples include: • Afkhami, R., & Tajar, A. “Ethno-religious groups and employment pattern in England and Wales using 2001 individual SARs.” Census Microdata: findings and futures (2008). • Al-Hamad, A., Hayes, L., & Flowerdew, R. “Migration of the Elderly to Join Existing Households: Evidence from the Household SAR.” Environment & Planning A 29(7) (1997): 1243-55. • Al-Hamad, A., Flowerdew, R., Hayes, L., et al., eds. “Migration of Elderly People to Join Existing Households: Some Evidence from the Household SARs.” Lancaster University, Lancaster, 1995. • Al-Rasheed, A. “The Other - Others: hidden Arabs?” In Peach, C. “Ethnicity in the 1991 Census. Volume 2: The ethnic minority populations of Great Britain.” HMSO, London (1996): 206-21. • Atkins, D. “What? Who? Where? When? and Why? - A Review of migration datasets.” (1994) • Bagguley, P., & Hussain, Y. “The Role of Higher Education in providing opportunities for Young South Asian Women Bristol.” The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Policy Press, Bristol, 2007. • Mitchell, R., Dujardin, C., Popham, F., et al. “Using matched areas to explore international differences in population health Social Science & Medicine.” Social Science and Medicine 73(8) (2011): 1113-1122.

Coverage


The SARs are a family of datasets drawn from the 1991 and 2001 UK Census. The SARs contain a separate record for each individual, but identifying information has been removed to protect confidentiality. The SARs datasets are similar to data from a survey, albeit with a much larger sample size thus permitting analysis of small sub-groups and small geographic levels. The SARs cover the full range of Census topics including, housing, education, health, transport, employment, ethnicity and religion. For the Census 2001, the Individual Licenced Sample of Anonymised Records (I-SAR) had a sample size of 1,843,525 cases. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2001, approximately one third of the total UK population was aged 50 and over.]


1991


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex.


Census data For example, the 2001 Individual Licensed SAR (I-SAR) was sampled from the One Number Census (ONC) database for the entire UK. Thus individuals and households imputed as part of the ONC are included in the SARs.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License.


All ages


The data are representative of the UK population that were enumerated by the census (including those living in Communal Establishments) Note: Some datasets do not cover all constituent countries The dataset does not include weighting variables


The Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs) are a family of datasets which are currently available from the 1991 and 2001 Censuses and will be available in due course from the 2011 Census. Each file is a sample of individual person-level records drawn from the census database that has been anonymised. Each file contains a broad range of socio-demographic characteristics for respondents, with a particular emphasis on either individual, household, or geographical detail. The SARs allow flexible, multivariate analysis at the individual level. They are a unique data source for the investigation of a range of social issues including household composition, ethnic differences, education and employment. The SARs differ from traditional Census outputs in that they are not aggregated into pre-determined tables.


A list of publications is maintained by the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research at the University of Manchester: www.ccsr.ac.uk/.../jointpub.html
Examples include: • Afkhami, R., & Tajar, A. “Ethno-religious groups and employment pattern in England and Wales using 2001 individual SARs.” Census Microdata: findings and futures (2008). • Al-Hamad, A., Hayes, L., & Flowerdew, R. “Migration of the Elderly to Join Existing Households: Evidence from the Household SAR.” Environment & Planning A 29(7) (1997): 1243-55. • Al-Hamad, A., Flowerdew, R., Hayes, L., et al., eds. “Migration of Elderly People to Join Existing Households: Some Evidence from the Household SARs.” Lancaster University, Lancaster, 1995. • Al-Rasheed, A. “The Other - Others: hidden Arabs?” In Peach, C. “Ethnicity in the 1991 Census. Volume 2: The ethnic minority populations of Great Britain.” HMSO, London (1996): 206-21. • Atkins, D. “What? Who? Where? When? and Why? - A Review of migration datasets.” (1994) • Bagguley, P., & Hussain, Y. “The Role of Higher Education in providing opportunities for Young South Asian Women Bristol.” The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Policy Press, Bristol, 2007. • Mitchell, R., Dujardin, C., Popham, F., et al. “Using matched areas to explore international differences in population health Social Science & Medicine.” Social Science and Medicine 73(8) (2011): 1113-1122

Coverage


The SARs are a family of datasets drawn from the 1991 and 2001 UK Census. The SARs contain a separate record for each individual, but identifying information has been removed to protect confidentiality. The SARs datasets are similar to data from a survey, albeit with a much larger sample size thus permitting analysis of small sub-groups and small geographic levels. The SARs cover the full range of Census topics including, housing, education, health, transport, employment, ethnicity and religion. For the Census 2001, the Individual Licenced Sample of Anonymised Records (I-SAR) had a sample size of 1,843,525 cases. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2001, approximately one third of the total UK population was aged 50 and over.]


1991


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex.


Census data For example, the 2001 Individual Licensed SAR (I-SAR) was sampled from the One Number Census (ONC) database for the entire UK. Thus individuals and households imputed as part of the ONC are included in the SARs.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License.


All ages


The data are representative of the UK population that were enumerated by the census (including those living in Communal Establishments) Note: Some datasets do not cover all constituent countries The dataset does not include weighting variables


The Samples of Anonymised Records (SARs) are a family of datasets which are currently available from the 1991 and 2001 Censuses and will be available in due course from the 2011 Census. Each file is a sample of individual person-level records drawn from the census database that has been anonymised. Each file contains a broad range of socio-demographic characteristics for respondents, with a particular emphasis on either individual, household, or geographical detail. The SARs allow flexible, multivariate analysis at the individual level. They are a unique data source for the investigation of a range of social issues including household composition, ethnic differences, education and employment. The SARs differ from traditional Census outputs in that they are not aggregated into pre-determined tables.


A list of publications is maintained by the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research at the University of Manchester: www.ccsr.ac.uk/.../jointpub.html
Examples include: • Afkhami, R., & Tajar, A. “Ethno-religious groups and employment pattern in England and Wales using 2001 individual SARs.” Census Microdata: findings and futures (2008). • Al-Hamad, A., Hayes, L., & Flowerdew, R. “Migration of the Elderly to Join Existing Households: Evidence from the Household SAR.” Environment & Planning A 29(7) (1997): 1243-55. • Al-Hamad, A., Flowerdew, R., Hayes, L., et al., eds. “Migration of Elderly People to Join Existing Households: Some Evidence from the Household SARs.” Lancaster University, Lancaster, 1995. • Al-Rasheed, A. “The Other - Others: hidden Arabs?” In Peach, C. “Ethnicity in the 1991 Census. Volume 2: The ethnic minority populations of Great Britain.” HMSO, London (1996): 206-21. • Atkins, D. “What? Who? Where? When? and Why? - A Review of migration datasets.” (1994) • Bagguley, P., & Hussain, Y. “The Role of Higher Education in providing opportunities for Young South Asian Women Bristol.” The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Policy Press, Bristol, 2007. • Mitchell, R., Dujardin, C., Popham, F., et al. “Using matched areas to explore international differences in population health Social Science & Medicine.” Social Science and Medicine 73(8) (2011): 1113-1122.


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised.

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised.

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised.

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised.

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised.

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised.


Data quality


Summary information on data entry is not readily available, but the survey documentation contains the available information on data processing after the data was collected. For further information on data quality, contact ONS (Office for National Statistics), or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source. However, data are only every 10 years (because of the period between censuses).


The consistency of this data source is very good. Further information cannot be provided as that would entail discussing specific variables. For more information on data quality, contact ONS, or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


Summary information on data entry is not readily available, but the survey documentation contains the available information on data processing after the data was collected. For further information on data quality, contact ONS (Office for National Statistics), or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source. However, data are only every 10 years (because of the period between censuses).


The consistency of this data source is very good. Further information cannot be provided as that would entail discussing specific variables. For more information on data quality, contact ONS, or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


Summary information on data entry is not readily available, but the survey documentation contains the available information on data processing after the data was collected. For further information on data quality, contact ONS (Office for National Statistics), or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source. However, data are only every 10 years (because of the period between censuses).


The consistency of this data source is very good. Further information cannot be provided as that would entail discussing specific variables. For more information on data quality, contact ONS, or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


Summary information on data entry is not readily available, but the survey documentation contains the available information on data processing after the data was collected. For further information on data quality, contact ONS (Office for National Statistics), or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source. However, data are only every 10 years (because of the period between censuses).


The consistency of this data source is very good. Further information cannot be provided as that would entail discussing specific variables. For more information on data quality, contact ONS, or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


Summary information on data entry is not readily available, but the survey documentation contains the available information on data processing after the data was collected. For further information on data quality, contact ONS (Office for National Statistics), or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source. However, data are only every 10 years (because of the period between censuses).


The consistency of this data source is very good. Further information cannot be provided as that would entail discussing specific variables. For more information on data quality, contact ONS, or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


Summary information on data entry is not readily available, but the survey documentation contains the available information on data processing after the data was collected. For further information on data quality, contact ONS (Office for National Statistics), or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source. However, data are only every 10 years (because of the period between censuses).


The consistency of this data source is very good. Further information cannot be provided as that would entail discussing specific variables. For more information on data quality, contact ONS, or review the documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


The SARs are designed to ensure that sample members cannot be identified. In order to achieve this confidentiality, the amount of detail available is restricted to a non-disclosive level and individual respondents only appear in one file. Although such measures are taken, the data still look like that which might be collected if you were to conduct a survey yourself, and can be analysed in the same way. The SARs hold the further advantage of much larger sample sizes than are typical in alternative survey data sources. For example, the 2001 Individual SAR contains 3% of UK census records, equating to 1.84 million cases. The largest file, the 2001 Small Area Microdata (SAM), is a 5% file containing nearly three million cases. The SARs files contain data from one census only (1991 or 2001 or 2011 in due course). This contrasts with other individual level (or microdata) census products such as the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study, which links individual data records over time. However, unlike the Longitudinal Study, most SARs files can be downloaded and used at your own place of work rather than requiring access from a safe setting. Like other microdata files, the SARs enable researchers to analyse data in a very flexible manner. This enables users to: • apply their own definitions and create new variables • define tables • work with sub-populations • conduct multivariate analyses Because the files are very large, they also permit analyses of relatively small sub-populations for which it is often difficult to obtain sufficient sample sizes in other survey data. Consequently, a major use of the SARs has been for the analysis of individual ethnic groups. Statistics are most useful when they are comparable across space and time and the SARs were designed with this in mind. However, there are some difference between the 2001 and 1991 SARs. Some of these differences reflect changes in society leading to different questions in the census, others reflect changes in confidentiality disclosure control.

Applicability


The SARs are designed to ensure that sample members cannot be identified. In order to achieve this confidentiality, the amount of detail available is restricted to a non-disclosive level and individual respondents only appear in one file. Although such measures are taken, the data still look like that which might be collected if you were to conduct a survey yourself, and can be analysed in the same way. The SARs hold the further advantage of much larger sample sizes than are typical in alternative survey data sources. For example, the 2001 Individual SAR contains 3% of UK census records, equating to 1.84 million cases. The largest file, the 2001 Small Area Microdata (SAM), is a 5% file containing nearly three million cases. The SARs files contain data from one census only (1991 or 2001 or 2011 in due course). This contrasts with other individual level (or microdata) census products such as the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study, which links individual data records over time. However, unlike the Longitudinal Study, most SARs files can be downloaded and used at your own place of work rather than requiring access from a safe setting. Like other microdata files, the SARs enable researchers to analyse data in a very flexible manner. This enables users to: • apply their own definitions and create new variables • define tables • work with sub-populations • conduct multivariate analyses Because the files are very large, they also permit analyses of relatively small sub-populations for which it is often difficult to obtain sufficient sample sizes in other survey data. Consequently, a major use of the SARs has been for the analysis of individual ethnic groups. Statistics are most useful when they are comparable across space and time and the SARs were designed with this in mind. However, there are some difference between the 2001 and 1991 SARs. Some of these differences reflect changes in society leading to different questions in the census, others reflect changes in confidentiality disclosure control.

Applicability


The SARs are designed to ensure that sample members cannot be identified. In order to achieve this confidentiality, the amount of detail available is restricted to a non-disclosive level and individual respondents only appear in one file. Although such measures are taken, the data still look like that which might be collected if you were to conduct a survey yourself, and can be analysed in the same way. The SARs hold the further advantage of much larger sample sizes than are typical in alternative survey data sources. For example, the 2001 Individual SAR contains 3% of UK census records, equating to 1.84 million cases. The largest file, the 2001 Small Area Microdata (SAM), is a 5% file containing nearly three million cases. The SARs files contain data from one census only (1991 or 2001 or 2011 in due course). This contrasts with other individual level (or microdata) census products such as the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study, which links individual data records over time. However, unlike the Longitudinal Study, most SARs files can be downloaded and used at your own place of work rather than requiring access from a safe setting. Like other microdata files, the SARs enable researchers to analyse data in a very flexible manner. This enables users to: • apply their own definitions and create new variables • define tables • work with sub-populations • conduct multivariate analyses Because the files are very large, they also permit analyses of relatively small sub-populations for which it is often difficult to obtain sufficient sample sizes in other survey data. Consequently, a major use of the SARs has been for the analysis of individual ethnic groups. Statistics are most useful when they are comparable across space and time and the SARs were designed with this in mind. However, there are some difference between the 2001 and 1991 SARs. Some of these differences reflect changes in society leading to different questions in the census, others reflect changes in confidentiality disclosure control.

Applicability


The SARs are designed to ensure that sample members cannot be identified. In order to achieve this confidentiality, the amount of detail available is restricted to a non-disclosive level and individual respondents only appear in one file. Although such measures are taken, the data still look like that which might be collected if you were to conduct a survey yourself, and can be analysed in the same way. The SARs hold the further advantage of much larger sample sizes than are typical in alternative survey data sources. For example, the 2001 Individual SAR contains 3% of UK census records, equating to 1.84 million cases. The largest file, the 2001 Small Area Microdata (SAM), is a 5% file containing nearly three million cases. The SARs files contain data from one census only (1991 or 2001 or 2011 in due course). This contrasts with other individual level (or microdata) census products such as the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study, which links individual data records over time. However, unlike the Longitudinal Study, most SARs files can be downloaded and used at your own place of work rather than requiring access from a safe setting. Like other microdata files, the SARs enable researchers to analyse data in a very flexible manner. This enables users to: • apply their own definitions and create new variables • define tables • work with sub-populations • conduct multivariate analyses Because the files are very large, they also permit analyses of relatively small sub-populations for which it is often difficult to obtain sufficient sample sizes in other survey data. Consequently, a major use of the SARs has been for the analysis of individual ethnic groups. Statistics are most useful when they are comparable across space and time and the SARs were designed with this in mind. However, there are some difference between the 2001 and 1991 SARs. Some of these differences reflect changes in society leading to different questions in the census, others reflect changes in confidentiality disclosure control.

Applicability


The SARs are designed to ensure that sample members cannot be identified. In order to achieve this confidentiality, the amount of detail available is restricted to a non-disclosive level and individual respondents only appear in one file. Although such measures are taken, the data still look like that which might be collected if you were to conduct a survey yourself, and can be analysed in the same way. The SARs hold the further advantage of much larger sample sizes than are typical in alternative survey data sources. For example, the 2001 Individual SAR contains 3% of UK census records, equating to 1.84 million cases. The largest file, the 2001 Small Area Microdata (SAM), is a 5% file containing nearly three million cases. The SARs files contain data from one census only (1991 or 2001 or 2011 in due course). This contrasts with other individual level (or microdata) census products such as the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study, which links individual data records over time. However, unlike the Longitudinal Study, most SARs files can be downloaded and used at your own place of work rather than requiring access from a safe setting. Like other microdata files, the SARs enable researchers to analyse data in a very flexible manner. This enables users to: • apply their own definitions and create new variables • define tables • work with sub-populations • conduct multivariate analyses Because the files are very large, they also permit analyses of relatively small sub-populations for which it is often difficult to obtain sufficient sample sizes in other survey data. Consequently, a major use of the SARs has been for the analysis of individual ethnic groups. Statistics are most useful when they are comparable across space and time and the SARs were designed with this in mind. However, there are some difference between the 2001 and 1991 SARs. Some of these differences reflect changes in society leading to different questions in the census, others reflect changes in confidentiality disclosure control.

Applicability


The SARs are designed to ensure that sample members cannot be identified. In order to achieve this confidentiality, the amount of detail available is restricted to a non-disclosive level and individual respondents only appear in one file. Although such measures are taken, the data still look like that which might be collected if you were to conduct a survey yourself, and can be analysed in the same way. The SARs hold the further advantage of much larger sample sizes than are typical in alternative survey data sources. For example, the 2001 Individual SAR contains 3% of UK census records, equating to 1.84 million cases. The largest file, the 2001 Small Area Microdata (SAM), is a 5% file containing nearly three million cases. The SARs files contain data from one census only (1991 or 2001 or 2011 in due course). This contrasts with other individual level (or microdata) census products such as the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study, which links individual data records over time. However, unlike the Longitudinal Study, most SARs files can be downloaded and used at your own place of work rather than requiring access from a safe setting. Like other microdata files, the SARs enable researchers to analyse data in a very flexible manner. This enables users to: • apply their own definitions and create new variables • define tables • work with sub-populations • conduct multivariate analyses Because the files are very large, they also permit analyses of relatively small sub-populations for which it is often difficult to obtain sufficient sample sizes in other survey data. Consequently, a major use of the SARs has been for the analysis of individual ethnic groups. Statistics are most useful when they are comparable across space and time and the SARs were designed with this in mind. However, there are some difference between the 2001 and 1991 SARs. Some of these differences reflect changes in society leading to different questions in the census, others reflect changes in confidentiality disclosure control.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Mike Murphy
  • (see Partners)