Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

General Lifestyle Survey (GLF or GLS)
General Lifestyle Survey (GLF or GLS)

Topic
Education and Learning
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Work and Productivity
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Office for National Statistics
Customer Contact Centre
Government Buildings, Cardiff Road
NP10 8XG Newport, South Wales
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1633 455678.
Email: socialsurveys(at)ons.gsi.gov.uk
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Timeliness, transparency

The General Lifestyle Survey (GLF) completed the last year of field work at the end of 2011, with data processing and analysis taking place in 2012 and the final General Household report due to be published in early 2013.

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, regular


Historically, the survey has been a cross-section, but from 2005 the sample included a longitudinal component that rotated over four waves.

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, regular


Historically, the survey has been a cross-section, but from 2005 the sample included a longitudinal component that rotated over four waves.

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, regular


Historically, the survey has been a cross-section, but from 2005 the sample included a longitudinal component that rotated over four waves.

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, regular


Historically, the survey has been a cross-section, but from 2005 the sample included a longitudinal component that rotated over four waves.

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cross-section, regular


Historically, the survey has been a cross-section, but from 2005 the sample included a longitudinal component that rotated over four waves.

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The UK Data Archive holds GLF/GLS/GHS data from 1972 onwards, but the Special Licence (SL) versions are only available from 1998 onwards. The SL versions include all variables held in the standard 'End User Licence' (EUL) version, plus extra variables covering cigarette codes and descriptions and some birth date information for respondents and household members. Prospective users of the SL version of the GLF/GLS/GHS will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the extra variables, in order to get permission to use that version. For SL versions, the UK Data Service is required to request permission from the depositor prior to supplying the data, which is available to UK applicants only. Since these data pose a higher risk of disclosure than data made available under the standard End User Licence they have additional special conditions attached to them. Any registered user requiring access to these data will have to be accredited by the UK Statistics Authority as an Approved Researcher. To apply for accreditation a user will need to complete forms that will require: (i) evidence that he/she is a fit and proper person and details about the purpose of the research; (ii) an online order for the data; (iii) a signed declaration that he/she understands the confidentiality obligations owed to those data including its physical security. The evidence to be adduced will include previous research projects and publications. New users may need to provide the contact details of a senior member of staff who can vouch for them. The research purpose form will ask for information about the intended use of the data, a justification for access and planned outputs. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The UK Data Archive holds GLF/GLS/GHS data from 1972 onwards, but the Special Licence (SL) versions are only available from 1998 onwards. The SL versions include all variables held in the standard 'End User Licence' (EUL) version, plus extra variables covering cigarette codes and descriptions and some birth date information for respondents and household members. Prospective users of the SL version of the GLF/GLS/GHS will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the extra variables, in order to get permission to use that version. For SL versions, the UK Data Service is required to request permission from the depositor prior to supplying the data, which is available to UK applicants only. Since these data pose a higher risk of disclosure than data made available under the standard End User Licence they have additional special conditions attached to them. Any registered user requiring access to these data will have to be accredited by the UK Statistics Authority as an Approved Researcher. To apply for accreditation a user will need to complete forms that will require: (i) evidence that he/she is a fit and proper person and details about the purpose of the research; (ii) an online order for the data; (iii) a signed declaration that he/she understands the confidentiality obligations owed to those data including its physical security. The evidence to be adduced will include previous research projects and publications. New users may need to provide the contact details of a senior member of staff who can vouch for them. The research purpose form will ask for information about the intended use of the data, a justification for access and planned outputs. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The UK Data Archive holds GLF/GLS/GHS data from 1972 onwards, but the Special Licence (SL) versions are only available from 1998 onwards. The SL versions include all variables held in the standard 'End User Licence' (EUL) version, plus extra variables covering cigarette codes and descriptions and some birth date information for respondents and household members. Prospective users of the SL version of the GLF/GLS/GHS will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the extra variables, in order to get permission to use that version. For SL versions, the UK Data Service is required to request permission from the depositor prior to supplying the data, which is available to UK applicants only. Since these data pose a higher risk of disclosure than data made available under the standard End User Licence they have additional special conditions attached to them. Any registered user requiring access to these data will have to be accredited by the UK Statistics Authority as an Approved Researcher. To apply for accreditation a user will need to complete forms that will require: (i) evidence that he/she is a fit and proper person and details about the purpose of the research; (ii) an online order for the data; (iii) a signed declaration that he/she understands the confidentiality obligations owed to those data including its physical security. The evidence to be adduced will include previous research projects and publications. New users may need to provide the contact details of a senior member of staff who can vouch for them. The research purpose form will ask for information about the intended use of the data, a justification for access and planned outputs. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The UK Data Archive holds GLF/GLS/GHS data from 1972 onwards, but the Special Licence (SL) versions are only available from 1998 onwards. The SL versions include all variables held in the standard 'End User Licence' (EUL) version, plus extra variables covering cigarette codes and descriptions and some birth date information for respondents and household members. Prospective users of the SL version of the GLF/GLS/GHS will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the extra variables, in order to get permission to use that version. For SL versions, the UK Data Service is required to request permission from the depositor prior to supplying the data, which is available to UK applicants only. Since these data pose a higher risk of disclosure than data made available under the standard End User Licence they have additional special conditions attached to them. Any registered user requiring access to these data will have to be accredited by the UK Statistics Authority as an Approved Researcher. To apply for accreditation a user will need to complete forms that will require: (i) evidence that he/she is a fit and proper person and details about the purpose of the research; (ii) an online order for the data; (iii) a signed declaration that he/she understands the confidentiality obligations owed to those data including its physical security. The evidence to be adduced will include previous research projects and publications. New users may need to provide the contact details of a senior member of staff who can vouch for them. The research purpose form will ask for information about the intended use of the data, a justification for access and planned outputs. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The UK Data Archive holds GLF/GLS/GHS data from 1972 onwards, but the Special Licence (SL) versions are only available from 1998 onwards. The SL versions include all variables held in the standard 'End User Licence' (EUL) version, plus extra variables covering cigarette codes and descriptions and some birth date information for respondents and household members. Prospective users of the SL version of the GLF/GLS/GHS will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the extra variables, in order to get permission to use that version. For SL versions, the UK Data Service is required to request permission from the depositor prior to supplying the data, which is available to UK applicants only. Since these data pose a higher risk of disclosure than data made available under the standard End User Licence they have additional special conditions attached to them. Any registered user requiring access to these data will have to be accredited by the UK Statistics Authority as an Approved Researcher. To apply for accreditation a user will need to complete forms that will require: (i) evidence that he/she is a fit and proper person and details about the purpose of the research; (ii) an online order for the data; (iii) a signed declaration that he/she understands the confidentiality obligations owed to those data including its physical security. The evidence to be adduced will include previous research projects and publications. New users may need to provide the contact details of a senior member of staff who can vouch for them. The research purpose form will ask for information about the intended use of the data, a justification for access and planned outputs. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The GHS started in 1971 and has been carried out continuously since then, except for breaks in 1997-1998 when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000 when the survey was redeveloped. Following the 1997 review, the survey was re-launched from April 2000 with a different design. The relevant development work and the changes made are described in the Living in Britain report for the 2000-2001 survey. Following its review, the GHS was changed to comprise two elements: the continuous survey and extra modules, or 'trailers'. The continuous survey remained unchanged from 2000 to 2004, apart from essential adjustments to take account of, for example, changes in benefits and pensions. The GHS retained its modular structure and this allowed a number of different trailers to be included for each of those years, to a plan agreed by sponsoring government departments. From April 1994 to 2005, the GHS was conducted on a financial year basis, with fieldwork spread evenly from April of one year to March the following year. However, in 2005 the survey period reverted to a calendar year and the whole of the annual sample was surveyed in the nine months from April to December 2005. The GHS then ran from January to December each year, hence the title date change to single year from 2005 onwards. Since the 2005 GHS did not cover the January-March quarter, this affected annual estimates for topics which are subject to seasonal variation. To rectify this, where the questions were the same in 2005 as in 2004-2005, the final quarter of the latter survey was added (weighted in the correct proportion) to the nine months of the 2005 survey. The GLF completed the last year of field work at the end of 2011, with data processing and analysis taking place in 2012 and the final General Household report due to be published in early 2013. The face-to-face survey collected information on a range of topics from people living in private households in Great Britain, including smoking and drinking; health; households; families and people; housing and consumer durables; marriage and cohabitation; occupational and personal pension schemes; and income. Until the change at the start of 2012, the GLF was conducted on an annual basis. Fieldwork was undertaken by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Social Survey Division and the survey used a probability, stratified two-stage clustered sample of approximately 13,000 addresses selected in Great Britain per annum; providing an achieved sample of around 9,000 households. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1971


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All ages


Representative of all people living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables. The data are cleaned, edited and weighted in two stages, the first step to compensate for non-response and differential probabilities of selection and the second weights the sample distribution so that it matches the population distribution in terms of region, age group and sex.


The General Lifestyle Survey (GLF), formerly the General Household Survey (GHS), is a continuous national survey of people living in private households conducted on an annual basis, by the Social Survey Division of the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The main aim of the survey is to collect data on a range of core topics, covering household, family and individual information. This information is used by government departments and other organisations for planning, policy and monitoring purposes, and to present a picture of households, family and people in Great Britain. From 2008, the GHS became a module of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). In recognition, the survey was renamed the General Lifestyle Survey. As noted above, the GHS became the GLF/GLS in 2008. The sample design of the GLF/GLS is the same as the GHS before, and the questionnaire remains largely the same. The main change is that the GLF now includes the IHS core questions, which are common to all of the separate modules that together comprise the IHS. Some of these core questions are simply questions that were previously asked in the same or a similar format on all of the IHS component surveys (including the GLF/GLS). The core questions cover employment, smoking prevalence, general health, ethnicity, citizenship and national identity. These questions are asked by proxy if an interview is not possible with the selected respondent (that is a member of the household can answer on behalf of other respondents in the household). This is a departure from the GHS which did not ask smoking prevalence and general health questions by proxy, whereas the GLF/GLS does from 2008. (For details on other changes to the GLF/GLS questionnaire, please see the GLF 2008: Special Licence Access documentation, which is held on the UK Data Service website.) The main GLF/GLS/GHS consists of a household questionnaire, completed by the Household Reference Person, and an individual questionnaire, completed by all adults aged 16 and over resident in the household. A number of different trailers each year covering extra topics were included in later (post-review) surveys in the series from 2000. The household questionnaire covers the following topics: household information, accommodation type, housing tenure/costs, and consumer durables including vehicle ownership. The individual questionnaire includes data from the household dataset, and additional sections on migration/citizenship/national identity/ethnicity, employment, pensions, education, health, child care, smoking, drinking, family information, financial situation, and income. In January 2012 a number of question blocks that had previously been asked on the GLF were transferred onto the Opinions Survey. These cover topics such as Family Formation, Health, and Drinking. This merged survey has become the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey from April 2012. The section of the GLF collecting the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for Eurostat has become its own survey, with further information being collected on the Family Resource Survey.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some reports may now be out of print: • Coulthard, M., Walker, A., & Morgan A. “Assessing people's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” Health Development Agency, London (2001). • Goddard, E. “Voluntary work : a study carried out on behalf of the Home Office as part of the 1992 General Household Survey.” OPCS Social Survey Division Series GHS No.23 Supplement A, HMSO, London, 1992. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1994 General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1996. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1998 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2000. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Disadvantaged households: results from the 2000 survey.” The Stationary Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People aged 65 and over: results of an independent study carried out on behalf of the Department of Health as part of the 2001 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Carers 2000.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Sports and leisure: results from the sports and leisure module of the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • OPCS, Social Survey Division. “General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1972-1995.

Coverage


The GHS started in 1971 and has been carried out continuously since then, except for breaks in 1997-1998 when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000 when the survey was redeveloped. Following the 1997 review, the survey was re-launched from April 2000 with a different design. The relevant development work and the changes made are described in the Living in Britain report for the 2000-2001 survey. Following its review, the GHS was changed to comprise two elements: the continuous survey and extra modules, or 'trailers'. The continuous survey remained unchanged from 2000 to 2004, apart from essential adjustments to take account of, for example, changes in benefits and pensions. The GHS retained its modular structure and this allowed a number of different trailers to be included for each of those years, to a plan agreed by sponsoring government departments. From April 1994 to 2005, the GHS was conducted on a financial year basis, with fieldwork spread evenly from April of one year to March the following year. However, in 2005 the survey period reverted to a calendar year and the whole of the annual sample was surveyed in the nine months from April to December 2005. The GHS then ran from January to December each year, hence the title date change to single year from 2005 onwards. Since the 2005 GHS did not cover the January-March quarter, this affected annual estimates for topics which are subject to seasonal variation. To rectify this, where the questions were the same in 2005 as in 2004-2005, the final quarter of the latter survey was added (weighted in the correct proportion) to the nine months of the 2005 survey. The GLF completed the last year of field work at the end of 2011, with data processing and analysis taking place in 2012 and the final General Household report due to be published in early 2013. The face-to-face survey collected information on a range of topics from people living in private households in Great Britain, including smoking and drinking; health; households; families and people; housing and consumer durables; marriage and cohabitation; occupational and personal pension schemes; and income. Until the change at the start of 2012, the GLF was conducted on an annual basis. Fieldwork was undertaken by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Social Survey Division and the survey used a probability, stratified two-stage clustered sample of approximately 13,000 addresses selected in Great Britain per annum; providing an achieved sample of around 9,000 households. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1971


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All ages


Representative of all people living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables. The data are cleaned, edited and weighted in two stages, the first step to compensate for non-response and differential probabilities of selection and the second weights the sample distribution so that it matches the population distribution in terms of region, age group and sex.


The General Lifestyle Survey (GLF), formerly the General Household Survey (GHS), is a continuous national survey of people living in private households conducted on an annual basis, by the Social Survey Division of the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The main aim of the survey is to collect data on a range of core topics, covering household, family and individual information. This information is used by government departments and other organisations for planning, policy and monitoring purposes, and to present a picture of households, family and people in Great Britain. From 2008, the GHS became a module of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). In recognition, the survey was renamed the General Lifestyle Survey. As noted above, the GHS became the GLF/GLS in 2008. The sample design of the GLF/GLS is the same as the GHS before, and the questionnaire remains largely the same. The main change is that the GLF now includes the IHS core questions, which are common to all of the separate modules that together comprise the IHS. Some of these core questions are simply questions that were previously asked in the same or a similar format on all of the IHS component surveys (including the GLF/GLS). The core questions cover employment, smoking prevalence, general health, ethnicity, citizenship and national identity. These questions are asked by proxy if an interview is not possible with the selected respondent (that is a member of the household can answer on behalf of other respondents in the household). This is a departure from the GHS which did not ask smoking prevalence and general health questions by proxy, whereas the GLF/GLS does from 2008. (For details on other changes to the GLF/GLS questionnaire, please see the GLF 2008: Special Licence Access documentation, which is held on the UK Data Service website.) The main GLF/GLS/GHS consists of a household questionnaire, completed by the Household Reference Person, and an individual questionnaire, completed by all adults aged 16 and over resident in the household. A number of different trailers each year covering extra topics were included in later (post-review) surveys in the series from 2000. The household questionnaire covers the following topics: household information, accommodation type, housing tenure/costs, and consumer durables including vehicle ownership. The individual questionnaire includes data from the household dataset, and additional sections on migration/citizenship/national identity/ethnicity, employment, pensions, education, health, child care, smoking, drinking, family information, financial situation, and income. In January 2012 a number of question blocks that had previously been asked on the GLF were transferred onto the Opinions Survey. These cover topics such as Family Formation, Health, and Drinking. This merged survey has become the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey from April 2012. The section of the GLF collecting the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for Eurostat has become its own survey, with further information being collected on the Family Resource Survey.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some reports may now be out of print: • Coulthard, M., Walker, A., & Morgan A. “Assessing people's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” Health Development Agency, London (2001). • Goddard, E. “Voluntary work : a study carried out on behalf of the Home Office as part of the 1992 General Household Survey.” OPCS Social Survey Division Series GHS No.23 Supplement A, HMSO, London, 1992. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1994 General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1996. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1998 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2000. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Disadvantaged households: results from the 2000 survey.” The Stationary Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People aged 65 and over: results of an independent study carried out on behalf of the Department of Health as part of the 2001 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Carers 2000.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Sports and leisure: results from the sports and leisure module of the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • OPCS, Social Survey Division. “General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1972-1995.

Coverage


The GHS started in 1971 and has been carried out continuously since then, except for breaks in 1997-1998 when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000 when the survey was redeveloped. Following the 1997 review, the survey was re-launched from April 2000 with a different design. The relevant development work and the changes made are described in the Living in Britain report for the 2000-2001 survey. Following its review, the GHS was changed to comprise two elements: the continuous survey and extra modules, or 'trailers'. The continuous survey remained unchanged from 2000 to 2004, apart from essential adjustments to take account of, for example, changes in benefits and pensions. The GHS retained its modular structure and this allowed a number of different trailers to be included for each of those years, to a plan agreed by sponsoring government departments. From April 1994 to 2005, the GHS was conducted on a financial year basis, with fieldwork spread evenly from April of one year to March the following year. However, in 2005 the survey period reverted to a calendar year and the whole of the annual sample was surveyed in the nine months from April to December 2005. The GHS then ran from January to December each year, hence the title date change to single year from 2005 onwards. Since the 2005 GHS did not cover the January-March quarter, this affected annual estimates for topics which are subject to seasonal variation. To rectify this, where the questions were the same in 2005 as in 2004-2005, the final quarter of the latter survey was added (weighted in the correct proportion) to the nine months of the 2005 survey. The GLF completed the last year of field work at the end of 2011, with data processing and analysis taking place in 2012 and the final General Household report due to be published in early 2013. The face-to-face survey collected information on a range of topics from people living in private households in Great Britain, including smoking and drinking; health; households; families and people; housing and consumer durables; marriage and cohabitation; occupational and personal pension schemes; and income. Until the change at the start of 2012, the GLF was conducted on an annual basis. Fieldwork was undertaken by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Social Survey Division and the survey used a probability, stratified two-stage clustered sample of approximately 13,000 addresses selected in Great Britain per annum; providing an achieved sample of around 9,000 households. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1971


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All ages


Representative of all people living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables. The data are cleaned, edited and weighted in two stages, the first step to compensate for non-response and differential probabilities of selection and the second weights the sample distribution so that it matches the population distribution in terms of region, age group and sex.


The General Lifestyle Survey (GLF), formerly the General Household Survey (GHS), is a continuous national survey of people living in private households conducted on an annual basis, by the Social Survey Division of the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The main aim of the survey is to collect data on a range of core topics, covering household, family and individual information. This information is used by government departments and other organisations for planning, policy and monitoring purposes, and to present a picture of households, family and people in Great Britain. From 2008, the GHS became a module of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). In recognition, the survey was renamed the General Lifestyle Survey. As noted above, the GHS became the GLF/GLS in 2008. The sample design of the GLF/GLS is the same as the GHS before, and the questionnaire remains largely the same. The main change is that the GLF now includes the IHS core questions, which are common to all of the separate modules that together comprise the IHS. Some of these core questions are simply questions that were previously asked in the same or a similar format on all of the IHS component surveys (including the GLF/GLS). The core questions cover employment, smoking prevalence, general health, ethnicity, citizenship and national identity. These questions are asked by proxy if an interview is not possible with the selected respondent (that is a member of the household can answer on behalf of other respondents in the household). This is a departure from the GHS which did not ask smoking prevalence and general health questions by proxy, whereas the GLF/GLS does from 2008. (For details on other changes to the GLF/GLS questionnaire, please see the GLF 2008: Special Licence Access documentation, which is held on the UK Data Service website.) The main GLF/GLS/GHS consists of a household questionnaire, completed by the Household Reference Person, and an individual questionnaire, completed by all adults aged 16 and over resident in the household. A number of different trailers each year covering extra topics were included in later (post-review) surveys in the series from 2000. The household questionnaire covers the following topics: household information, accommodation type, housing tenure/costs, and consumer durables including vehicle ownership. The individual questionnaire includes data from the household dataset, and additional sections on migration/citizenship/national identity/ethnicity, employment, pensions, education, health, child care, smoking, drinking, family information, financial situation, and income. In January 2012 a number of question blocks that had previously been asked on the GLF were transferred onto the Opinions Survey. These cover topics such as Family Formation, Health, and Drinking. This merged survey has become the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey from April 2012. The section of the GLF collecting the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for Eurostat has become its own survey, with further information being collected on the Family Resource Survey.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some reports may now be out of print: • Coulthard, M., Walker, A., & Morgan A. “Assessing people's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” Health Development Agency, London (2001). • Goddard, E. “Voluntary work : a study carried out on behalf of the Home Office as part of the 1992 General Household Survey.” OPCS Social Survey Division Series GHS No.23 Supplement A, HMSO, London, 1992. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1994 General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1996. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1998 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2000. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Disadvantaged households: results from the 2000 survey.” The Stationary Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People aged 65 and over: results of an independent study carried out on behalf of the Department of Health as part of the 2001 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Carers 2000.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Sports and leisure: results from the sports and leisure module of the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • OPCS, Social Survey Division. “General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1972-1995.

Coverage


The GHS started in 1971 and has been carried out continuously since then, except for breaks in 1997-1998 when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000 when the survey was redeveloped. Following the 1997 review, the survey was re-launched from April 2000 with a different design. The relevant development work and the changes made are described in the Living in Britain report for the 2000-2001 survey. Following its review, the GHS was changed to comprise two elements: the continuous survey and extra modules, or 'trailers'. The continuous survey remained unchanged from 2000 to 2004, apart from essential adjustments to take account of, for example, changes in benefits and pensions. The GHS retained its modular structure and this allowed a number of different trailers to be included for each of those years, to a plan agreed by sponsoring government departments. From April 1994 to 2005, the GHS was conducted on a financial year basis, with fieldwork spread evenly from April of one year to March the following year. However, in 2005 the survey period reverted to a calendar year and the whole of the annual sample was surveyed in the nine months from April to December 2005. The GHS then ran from January to December each year, hence the title date change to single year from 2005 onwards. Since the 2005 GHS did not cover the January-March quarter, this affected annual estimates for topics which are subject to seasonal variation. To rectify this, where the questions were the same in 2005 as in 2004-2005, the final quarter of the latter survey was added (weighted in the correct proportion) to the nine months of the 2005 survey. The GLF completed the last year of field work at the end of 2011, with data processing and analysis taking place in 2012 and the final General Household report due to be published in early 2013. The face-to-face survey collected information on a range of topics from people living in private households in Great Britain, including smoking and drinking; health; households; families and people; housing and consumer durables; marriage and cohabitation; occupational and personal pension schemes; and income. Until the change at the start of 2012, the GLF was conducted on an annual basis. Fieldwork was undertaken by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Social Survey Division and the survey used a probability, stratified two-stage clustered sample of approximately 13,000 addresses selected in Great Britain per annum; providing an achieved sample of around 9,000 households. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1971


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All ages


Representative of all people living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables. The data are cleaned, edited and weighted in two stages, the first step to compensate for non-response and differential probabilities of selection and the second weights the sample distribution so that it matches the population distribution in terms of region, age group and sex.


The General Lifestyle Survey (GLF), formerly the General Household Survey (GHS), is a continuous national survey of people living in private households conducted on an annual basis, by the Social Survey Division of the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The main aim of the survey is to collect data on a range of core topics, covering household, family and individual information. This information is used by government departments and other organisations for planning, policy and monitoring purposes, and to present a picture of households, family and people in Great Britain. From 2008, the GHS became a module of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). In recognition, the survey was renamed the General Lifestyle Survey. As noted above, the GHS became the GLF/GLS in 2008. The sample design of the GLF/GLS is the same as the GHS before, and the questionnaire remains largely the same. The main change is that the GLF now includes the IHS core questions, which are common to all of the separate modules that together comprise the IHS. Some of these core questions are simply questions that were previously asked in the same or a similar format on all of the IHS component surveys (including the GLF/GLS). The core questions cover employment, smoking prevalence, general health, ethnicity, citizenship and national identity. These questions are asked by proxy if an interview is not possible with the selected respondent (that is a member of the household can answer on behalf of other respondents in the household). This is a departure from the GHS which did not ask smoking prevalence and general health questions by proxy, whereas the GLF/GLS does from 2008. (For details on other changes to the GLF/GLS questionnaire, please see the GLF 2008: Special Licence Access documentation, which is held on the UK Data Service website.) The main GLF/GLS/GHS consists of a household questionnaire, completed by the Household Reference Person, and an individual questionnaire, completed by all adults aged 16 and over resident in the household. A number of different trailers each year covering extra topics were included in later (post-review) surveys in the series from 2000. The household questionnaire covers the following topics: household information, accommodation type, housing tenure/costs, and consumer durables including vehicle ownership. The individual questionnaire includes data from the household dataset, and additional sections on migration/citizenship/national identity/ethnicity, employment, pensions, education, health, child care, smoking, drinking, family information, financial situation, and income. In January 2012 a number of question blocks that had previously been asked on the GLF were transferred onto the Opinions Survey. These cover topics such as Family Formation, Health, and Drinking. This merged survey has become the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey from April 2012. The section of the GLF collecting the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for Eurostat has become its own survey, with further information being collected on the Family Resource Survey.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some reports may now be out of print: • Coulthard, M., Walker, A., & Morgan A. “Assessing people's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” Health Development Agency, London (2001). • Goddard, E. “Voluntary work : a study carried out on behalf of the Home Office as part of the 1992 General Household Survey.” OPCS Social Survey Division Series GHS No.23 Supplement A, HMSO, London, 1992. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1994 General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1996. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1998 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2000. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Disadvantaged households: results from the 2000 survey.” The Stationary Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People aged 65 and over: results of an independent study carried out on behalf of the Department of Health as part of the 2001 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Carers 2000.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Sports and leisure: results from the sports and leisure module of the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • OPCS, Social Survey Division. “General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1972-1995.

Coverage


The GHS started in 1971 and has been carried out continuously since then, except for breaks in 1997-1998 when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000 when the survey was redeveloped. Following the 1997 review, the survey was re-launched from April 2000 with a different design. The relevant development work and the changes made are described in the Living in Britain report for the 2000-2001 survey. Following its review, the GHS was changed to comprise two elements: the continuous survey and extra modules, or 'trailers'. The continuous survey remained unchanged from 2000 to 2004, apart from essential adjustments to take account of, for example, changes in benefits and pensions. The GHS retained its modular structure and this allowed a number of different trailers to be included for each of those years, to a plan agreed by sponsoring government departments. From April 1994 to 2005, the GHS was conducted on a financial year basis, with fieldwork spread evenly from April of one year to March the following year. However, in 2005 the survey period reverted to a calendar year and the whole of the annual sample was surveyed in the nine months from April to December 2005. The GHS then ran from January to December each year, hence the title date change to single year from 2005 onwards. Since the 2005 GHS did not cover the January-March quarter, this affected annual estimates for topics which are subject to seasonal variation. To rectify this, where the questions were the same in 2005 as in 2004-2005, the final quarter of the latter survey was added (weighted in the correct proportion) to the nine months of the 2005 survey. The GLF completed the last year of field work at the end of 2011, with data processing and analysis taking place in 2012 and the final General Household report due to be published in early 2013. The face-to-face survey collected information on a range of topics from people living in private households in Great Britain, including smoking and drinking; health; households; families and people; housing and consumer durables; marriage and cohabitation; occupational and personal pension schemes; and income. Until the change at the start of 2012, the GLF was conducted on an annual basis. Fieldwork was undertaken by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Social Survey Division and the survey used a probability, stratified two-stage clustered sample of approximately 13,000 addresses selected in Great Britain per annum; providing an achieved sample of around 9,000 households. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1971


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All ages


Representative of all people living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables. The data are cleaned, edited and weighted in two stages, the first step to compensate for non-response and differential probabilities of selection and the second weights the sample distribution so that it matches the population distribution in terms of region, age group and sex.


The General Lifestyle Survey (GLF), formerly the General Household Survey (GHS), is a continuous national survey of people living in private households conducted on an annual basis, by the Social Survey Division of the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The main aim of the survey is to collect data on a range of core topics, covering household, family and individual information. This information is used by government departments and other organisations for planning, policy and monitoring purposes, and to present a picture of households, family and people in Great Britain. From 2008, the GHS became a module of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). In recognition, the survey was renamed the General Lifestyle Survey. As noted above, the GHS became the GLF/GLS in 2008. The sample design of the GLF/GLS is the same as the GHS before, and the questionnaire remains largely the same. The main change is that the GLF now includes the IHS core questions, which are common to all of the separate modules that together comprise the IHS. Some of these core questions are simply questions that were previously asked in the same or a similar format on all of the IHS component surveys (including the GLF/GLS). The core questions cover employment, smoking prevalence, general health, ethnicity, citizenship and national identity. These questions are asked by proxy if an interview is not possible with the selected respondent (that is a member of the household can answer on behalf of other respondents in the household). This is a departure from the GHS which did not ask smoking prevalence and general health questions by proxy, whereas the GLF/GLS does from 2008. (For details on other changes to the GLF/GLS questionnaire, please see the GLF 2008: Special Licence Access documentation, which is held on the UK Data Service website.) The main GLF/GLS/GHS consists of a household questionnaire, completed by the Household Reference Person, and an individual questionnaire, completed by all adults aged 16 and over resident in the household. A number of different trailers each year covering extra topics were included in later (post-review) surveys in the series from 2000. The household questionnaire covers the following topics: household information, accommodation type, housing tenure/costs, and consumer durables including vehicle ownership. The individual questionnaire includes data from the household dataset, and additional sections on migration/citizenship/national identity/ethnicity, employment, pensions, education, health, child care, smoking, drinking, family information, financial situation, and income. In January 2012 a number of question blocks that had previously been asked on the GLF were transferred onto the Opinions Survey. These cover topics such as Family Formation, Health, and Drinking. This merged survey has become the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey from April 2012. The section of the GLF collecting the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for Eurostat has become its own survey, with further information being collected on the Family Resource Survey.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some reports may now be out of print: • Coulthard, M., Walker, A., & Morgan A. “Assessing people's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” Health Development Agency, London (2001). • Goddard, E. “Voluntary work : a study carried out on behalf of the Home Office as part of the 1992 General Household Survey.” OPCS Social Survey Division Series GHS No.23 Supplement A, HMSO, London, 1992. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1994 General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1996. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 1998 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2000. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Disadvantaged households: results from the 2000 survey.” The Stationary Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People aged 65 and over: results of an independent study carried out on behalf of the Department of Health as part of the 2001 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “People's perceptions of their neighbourhood and community involvement.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social Survey Division. “Carers 2000.” The Stationery Office, London, 2002. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Living in Britain: results from the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • ONS, Social and Vital Statistics Division. “Sports and leisure: results from the sports and leisure module of the 2002 General Household Survey.” The Stationery Office, London, 2003. • OPCS, Social Survey Division. “General Household Survey.” HMSO, London, 1972-1995.


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised


Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage, and are principally 1997-1998, when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000, when the survey was redeveloped.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage, and are principally 1997-1998, when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000, when the survey was redeveloped.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage, and are principally 1997-1998, when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000, when the survey was redeveloped.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage, and are principally 1997-1998, when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000, when the survey was redeveloped.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage, and are principally 1997-1998, when the survey was reviewed, and 1999-2000, when the survey was redeveloped.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


GLF data are used by a number of government departments to inform planning and policy decisions and to monitor the impact of policy changes in Great Britain. The survey covers a wide range of topics that are of great interest to policy makers and researchers within (and outside) Government. • The GLF and its predecessor the GHS has included questions on smoking and drinking behaviour since the 1970s. The resulting statistics and commentary have been published annually in the form of a survey report, which is widely used by government departments, health organisations and charities: www.ons.gov.uk/.../...nking-among-adults--2009.pdf
. • The GLF and GHS have included questions on health and the use of health services since the 1970s, providing a wealth of data, which has tracked changes in health for over 35 years. • General health and limiting long-term illness statistics from the GLF are used in the calculation of both official national health expectancies statistics, and experimental health expectancy statistics. Health expectancies partition years of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states: Healthy Life Expectancy (HLE) is a measure of the period of time an individual spends on average in very good or good general health; Disability-free Life Expectancy (DFLE) is a measure of the period of time and individual spends on average without a limiting long-term illness. This partitioning of the length of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states provides a quality dimension to life expectancy statistics. • Key external users of health expectancies derived from GLF data are: Department of Health (DH), Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), Department for Environment Food and Rural Development (DEFRA) • HLE and DFLE estimates are used by DH in describing the health status of the population, in monitoring changes over time and in evaluating the health needs of the population. In summary, these estimates are used in monitoring health inequalities and in targeting health resources. • GLF data on pension participation are used by a number of policy departments, including the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), HM Treasury (HMT) and HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The departments use the GLF to monitor and evaluate current policy and policy reforms, and to assist future policy development. Recent policy developments, for which the GLF has been one of a number of important sources, include the Government’s review of the 2012 workplace pension reforms, as set out in the Pensions Act 2008. • The GLF provides the longest running time series of statistics on childbearing histories and fertility intentions in Great Britain. Among other uses, these data are used by ONS to produce birth order estimates which inform the fertility assumptions used in the national population projection.

Applicability


GLF data are used by a number of government departments to inform planning and policy decisions and to monitor the impact of policy changes in Great Britain. The survey covers a wide range of topics that are of great interest to policy makers and researchers within (and outside) Government. • The GLF and its predecessor the GHS has included questions on smoking and drinking behaviour since the 1970s. The resulting statistics and commentary have been published annually in the form of a survey report, which is widely used by government departments, health organisations and charities: www.ons.gov.uk/.../...nking-among-adults--2009.pdf
. • The GLF and GHS have included questions on health and the use of health services since the 1970s, providing a wealth of data, which has tracked changes in health for over 35 years. • General health and limiting long-term illness statistics from the GLF are used in the calculation of both official national health expectancies statistics, and experimental health expectancy statistics. Health expectancies partition years of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states: Healthy Life Expectancy (HLE) is a measure of the period of time an individual spends on average in very good or good general health; Disability-free Life Expectancy (DFLE) is a measure of the period of time and individual spends on average without a limiting long-term illness. This partitioning of the length of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states provides a quality dimension to life expectancy statistics. • Key external users of health expectancies derived from GLF data are: Department of Health (DH), Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), Department for Environment Food and Rural Development (DEFRA) • HLE and DFLE estimates are used by DH in describing the health status of the population, in monitoring changes over time and in evaluating the health needs of the population. In summary, these estimates are used in monitoring health inequalities and in targeting health resources. • GLF data on pension participation are used by a number of policy departments, including the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), HM Treasury (HMT) and HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The departments use the GLF to monitor and evaluate current policy and policy reforms, and to assist future policy development. Recent policy developments, for which the GLF has been one of a number of important sources, include the Government’s review of the 2012 workplace pension reforms, as set out in the Pensions Act 2008. • The GLF provides the longest running time series of statistics on childbearing histories and fertility intentions in Great Britain. Among other uses, these data are used by ONS to produce birth order estimates which inform the fertility assumptions used in the national population projection.

Applicability


GLF data are used by a number of government departments to inform planning and policy decisions and to monitor the impact of policy changes in Great Britain. The survey covers a wide range of topics that are of great interest to policy makers and researchers within (and outside) Government. • The GLF and its predecessor the GHS has included questions on smoking and drinking behaviour since the 1970s. The resulting statistics and commentary have been published annually in the form of a survey report, which is widely used by government departments, health organisations and charities: www.ons.gov.uk/.../...nking-among-adults--2009.pdf
. • The GLF and GHS have included questions on health and the use of health services since the 1970s, providing a wealth of data, which has tracked changes in health for over 35 years. • General health and limiting long-term illness statistics from the GLF are used in the calculation of both official national health expectancies statistics, and experimental health expectancy statistics. Health expectancies partition years of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states: Healthy Life Expectancy (HLE) is a measure of the period of time an individual spends on average in very good or good general health; Disability-free Life Expectancy (DFLE) is a measure of the period of time and individual spends on average without a limiting long-term illness. This partitioning of the length of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states provides a quality dimension to life expectancy statistics. • Key external users of health expectancies derived from GLF data are: Department of Health (DH), Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), Department for Environment Food and Rural Development (DEFRA) • HLE and DFLE estimates are used by DH in describing the health status of the population, in monitoring changes over time and in evaluating the health needs of the population. In summary, these estimates are used in monitoring health inequalities and in targeting health resources. • GLF data on pension participation are used by a number of policy departments, including the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), HM Treasury (HMT) and HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The departments use the GLF to monitor and evaluate current policy and policy reforms, and to assist future policy development. Recent policy developments, for which the GLF has been one of a number of important sources, include the Government’s review of the 2012 workplace pension reforms, as set out in the Pensions Act 2008. • The GLF provides the longest running time series of statistics on childbearing histories and fertility intentions in Great Britain. Among other uses, these data are used by ONS to produce birth order estimates which inform the fertility assumptions used in the national population projection.

Applicability


GLF data are used by a number of government departments to inform planning and policy decisions and to monitor the impact of policy changes in Great Britain. The survey covers a wide range of topics that are of great interest to policy makers and researchers within (and outside) Government. • The GLF and its predecessor the GHS has included questions on smoking and drinking behaviour since the 1970s. The resulting statistics and commentary have been published annually in the form of a survey report, which is widely used by government departments, health organisations and charities: www.ons.gov.uk/.../...nking-among-adults--2009.pdf
. • The GLF and GHS have included questions on health and the use of health services since the 1970s, providing a wealth of data, which has tracked changes in health for over 35 years. • General health and limiting long-term illness statistics from the GLF are used in the calculation of both official national health expectancies statistics, and experimental health expectancy statistics. Health expectancies partition years of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states: Healthy Life Expectancy (HLE) is a measure of the period of time an individual spends on average in very good or good general health; Disability-free Life Expectancy (DFLE) is a measure of the period of time and individual spends on average without a limiting long-term illness. This partitioning of the length of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states provides a quality dimension to life expectancy statistics. • Key external users of health expectancies derived from GLF data are: Department of Health (DH), Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), Department for Environment Food and Rural Development (DEFRA) • HLE and DFLE estimates are used by DH in describing the health status of the population, in monitoring changes over time and in evaluating the health needs of the population. In summary, these estimates are used in monitoring health inequalities and in targeting health resources. • GLF data on pension participation are used by a number of policy departments, including the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), HM Treasury (HMT) and HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The departments use the GLF to monitor and evaluate current policy and policy reforms, and to assist future policy development. Recent policy developments, for which the GLF has been one of a number of important sources, include the Government’s review of the 2012 workplace pension reforms, as set out in the Pensions Act 2008. • The GLF provides the longest running time series of statistics on childbearing histories and fertility intentions in Great Britain. Among other uses, these data are used by ONS to produce birth order estimates which inform the fertility assumptions used in the national population projection.

Applicability


GLF data are used by a number of government departments to inform planning and policy decisions and to monitor the impact of policy changes in Great Britain. The survey covers a wide range of topics that are of great interest to policy makers and researchers within (and outside) Government. • The GLF and its predecessor the GHS has included questions on smoking and drinking behaviour since the 1970s. The resulting statistics and commentary have been published annually in the form of a survey report, which is widely used by government departments, health organisations and charities: www.ons.gov.uk/.../...nking-among-adults--2009.pdf
. • The GLF and GHS have included questions on health and the use of health services since the 1970s, providing a wealth of data, which has tracked changes in health for over 35 years. • General health and limiting long-term illness statistics from the GLF are used in the calculation of both official national health expectancies statistics, and experimental health expectancy statistics. Health expectancies partition years of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states: Healthy Life Expectancy (HLE) is a measure of the period of time an individual spends on average in very good or good general health; Disability-free Life Expectancy (DFLE) is a measure of the period of time and individual spends on average without a limiting long-term illness. This partitioning of the length of life into periods spent in favourable and unfavourable health states provides a quality dimension to life expectancy statistics. • Key external users of health expectancies derived from GLF data are: Department of Health (DH), Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), Department for Environment Food and Rural Development (DEFRA) • HLE and DFLE estimates are used by DH in describing the health status of the population, in monitoring changes over time and in evaluating the health needs of the population. In summary, these estimates are used in monitoring health inequalities and in targeting health resources. • GLF data on pension participation are used by a number of policy departments, including the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), HM Treasury (HMT) and HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The departments use the GLF to monitor and evaluate current policy and policy reforms, and to assist future policy development. Recent policy developments, for which the GLF has been one of a number of important sources, include the Government’s review of the 2012 workplace pension reforms, as set out in the Pensions Act 2008. • The GLF provides the longest running time series of statistics on childbearing histories and fertility intentions in Great Britain. Among other uses, these data are used by ONS to produce birth order estimates which inform the fertility assumptions used in the national population projection.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Diana Lopez-Falcon
  • (see Partners)