Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Life Opportunities Survey (LOS)
Life Opportunities Survey (LOS)

Topic
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Work and Productivity
Education and Learning
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Office for National Statistics
Customer Contact Centre
Government Buildings, Cardiff Road
NP10 8XG Newport, South Wales
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1633 455678.
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Timeliness, transparency

Respondents will be interviewed every 12 months, and data should be available around 12 months after the end of fieldwork

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Users should note that there are two versions of each LOS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains geographic variables (Country, Government Office Region and Local Authority), deciles, age bands, a rural/urban indicator, and more information on household relationships, country of previous residence, medical conditions and occupations. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, there is no spatial unit and age is top-coded at 80. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. Therefore, users are strongly advised to order the standard version of the data. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Users should note that there are two versions of each LOS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains geographic variables (Country, Government Office Region and Local Authority), deciles, age bands, a rural/urban indicator, and more information on household relationships, country of previous residence, medical conditions and occupations. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, there is no spatial unit and age is top-coded at 80. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. Therefore, users are strongly advised to order the standard version of the data. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Users should note that there are two versions of each LOS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains geographic variables (Country, Government Office Region and Local Authority), deciles, age bands, a rural/urban indicator, and more information on household relationships, country of previous residence, medical conditions and occupations. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, there is no spatial unit and age is top-coded at 80. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. Therefore, users are strongly advised to order the standard version of the data. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Users should note that there are two versions of each LOS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains geographic variables (Country, Government Office Region and Local Authority), deciles, age bands, a rural/urban indicator, and more information on household relationships, country of previous residence, medical conditions and occupations. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, there is no spatial unit and age is top-coded at 80. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. Therefore, users are strongly advised to order the standard version of the data. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Users should note that there are two versions of each LOS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains geographic variables (Country, Government Office Region and Local Authority), deciles, age bands, a rural/urban indicator, and more information on household relationships, country of previous residence, medical conditions and occupations. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, there is no spatial unit and age is top-coded at 80. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. Therefore, users are strongly advised to order the standard version of the data. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Users should note that there are two versions of each LOS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains geographic variables (Country, Government Office Region and Local Authority), deciles, age bands, a rural/urban indicator, and more information on household relationships, country of previous residence, medical conditions and occupations. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, there is no spatial unit and age is top-coded at 80. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. Therefore, users are strongly advised to order the standard version of the data. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments The sample size of Wave One (2009-2011) is 46,693 cases (households that include 10 or more people have been removed from the data) [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009-2011


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


None, although detailed spatial data are available under Special License


Adults aged 16 and over (as well as some information about children aged 11-15)


Representative of all people aged 16 and over in (private) households in Great Britain. Parents or guardians will also be asked to provide some key data about children, aged 11 to 15. Children will be able to take part in a face-to-face interview when they reach age 16. The design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: a disabled group, a comparison group of non-disabled people, and a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time. The data include weighting variables


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments In 2007 the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) commissioned the ONS to develop a new longitudinal survey of disability. The LOS is a longitudinal survey. This means it will track the experiences of disabled people over time to assess transitions through key life stages, such as moving from childhood to adulthood or in and out of work. It is the first major ONS social survey to explore disability in terms of the social barriers to participation that people experience. The survey compares the experiences of disabled people with those of non-disabled people. The longitudinal design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: • disabled group • comparison group of non-disabled people • a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time Respondents will be interviewed every 12 months, whether they are resident in the original household or have since moved. Following the baseline survey only the first two groups will be interviewed face-to-face. The third group will be monitored over time via a shorter telephone interview to check for the onset of an impairment. If any member of the household has experienced the onset of impairment, they will be invited to take part in a face to face interview. Further information about the LOS series is available from the ONS. The first part is the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) core module. The core module collects basic demographic information and other household information for all members of the household. The second part of the questionnaire is the LOS module. This module is administered to each adult in the household and they are asked questions about: • education and training • employment • economic life and living standards • transport • leisure, social and cultural activities • social contact • housing • accessibility in the home • accessibility of public services • domestic life and social care • discrimination • crime • impairments and health conditions • disability as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act • income and benefits Information about impairments and health conditions of children aged 11 to 15 was collected by parental proxy.


Information on publications is available from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) website: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
And this includes information on Wave One findings: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
_wor_results

Coverage


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments The sample size of Wave One (2009-2011) is 46,693 cases (households that include 10 or more people have been removed from the data) [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009-2011


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


None, although detailed spatial data are available under Special License


Adults aged 16 and over (as well as some information about children aged 11-15)


Representative of all people aged 16 and over in (private) households in Great Britain. Parents or guardians will also be asked to provide some key data about children, aged 11 to 15. Children will be able to take part in a face-to-face interview when they reach age 16. The design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: a disabled group, a comparison group of non-disabled people, and a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time. The data include weighting variables


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments In 2007 the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) commissioned the ONS to develop a new longitudinal survey of disability. The LOS is a longitudinal survey. This means it will track the experiences of disabled people over time to assess transitions through key life stages, such as moving from childhood to adulthood or in and out of work. It is the first major ONS social survey to explore disability in terms of the social barriers to participation that people experience. The survey compares the experiences of disabled people with those of non-disabled people. The longitudinal design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: • disabled group • comparison group of non-disabled people • a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time Respondents will be interviewed every 12 months, whether they are resident in the original household or have since moved. Following the baseline survey only the first two groups will be interviewed face-to-face. The third group will be monitored over time via a shorter telephone interview to check for the onset of an impairment. If any member of the household has experienced the onset of impairment, they will be invited to take part in a face to face interview. Further information about the LOS series is available from the ONS. The first part is the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) core module. The core module collects basic demographic information and other household information for all members of the household. The second part of the questionnaire is the LOS module. This module is administered to each adult in the household and they are asked questions about: • education and training • employment • economic life and living standards • transport • leisure, social and cultural activities • social contact • housing • accessibility in the home • accessibility of public services • domestic life and social care • discrimination • crime • impairments and health conditions • disability as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act • income and benefits Information about impairments and health conditions of children aged 11 to 15 was collected by parental proxy.


Information on publications is available from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) website: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
And this includes information on Wave One findings: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
_wor_results

Coverage


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments The sample size of Wave One (2009-2011) is 46,693 cases (households that include 10 or more people have been removed from the data) [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009-2011


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


None, although detailed spatial data are available under Special License


Adults aged 16 and over (as well as some information about children aged 11-15)


Representative of all people aged 16 and over in (private) households in Great Britain. Parents or guardians will also be asked to provide some key data about children, aged 11 to 15. Children will be able to take part in a face-to-face interview when they reach age 16. The design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: a disabled group, a comparison group of non-disabled people, and a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time. The data include weighting variables


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments In 2007 the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) commissioned the ONS to develop a new longitudinal survey of disability. The LOS is a longitudinal survey. This means it will track the experiences of disabled people over time to assess transitions through key life stages, such as moving from childhood to adulthood or in and out of work. It is the first major ONS social survey to explore disability in terms of the social barriers to participation that people experience. The survey compares the experiences of disabled people with those of non-disabled people. The longitudinal design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: • disabled group • comparison group of non-disabled people • a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time Respondents will be interviewed every 12 months, whether they are resident in the original household or have since moved. Following the baseline survey only the first two groups will be interviewed face-to-face. The third group will be monitored over time via a shorter telephone interview to check for the onset of an impairment. If any member of the household has experienced the onset of impairment, they will be invited to take part in a face to face interview. Further information about the LOS series is available from the ONS. The first part is the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) core module. The core module collects basic demographic information and other household information for all members of the household. The second part of the questionnaire is the LOS module. This module is administered to each adult in the household and they are asked questions about: • education and training • employment • economic life and living standards • transport • leisure, social and cultural activities • social contact • housing • accessibility in the home • accessibility of public services • domestic life and social care • discrimination • crime • impairments and health conditions • disability as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act • income and benefits Information about impairments and health conditions of children aged 11 to 15 was collected by parental proxy.


Information on publications is available from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) website: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
And this includes information on Wave One findings: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
_wor_results

Coverage


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments The sample size of Wave One (2009-2011) is 46,693 cases (households that include 10 or more people have been removed from the data) [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009-2011


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


None, although detailed spatial data are available under Special License


Adults aged 16 and over (as well as some information about children aged 11-15)


Representative of all people aged 16 and over in (private) households in Great Britain. Parents or guardians will also be asked to provide some key data about children, aged 11 to 15. Children will be able to take part in a face-to-face interview when they reach age 16. The design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: a disabled group, a comparison group of non-disabled people, and a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time. The data include weighting variables


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments In 2007 the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) commissioned the ONS to develop a new longitudinal survey of disability. The LOS is a longitudinal survey. This means it will track the experiences of disabled people over time to assess transitions through key life stages, such as moving from childhood to adulthood or in and out of work. It is the first major ONS social survey to explore disability in terms of the social barriers to participation that people experience. The survey compares the experiences of disabled people with those of non-disabled people. The longitudinal design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: • disabled group • comparison group of non-disabled people • a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time Respondents will be interviewed every 12 months, whether they are resident in the original household or have since moved. Following the baseline survey only the first two groups will be interviewed face-to-face. The third group will be monitored over time via a shorter telephone interview to check for the onset of an impairment. If any member of the household has experienced the onset of impairment, they will be invited to take part in a face to face interview. Further information about the LOS series is available from the ONS. The first part is the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) core module. The core module collects basic demographic information and other household information for all members of the household. The second part of the questionnaire is the LOS module. This module is administered to each adult in the household and they are asked questions about: • education and training • employment • economic life and living standards • transport • leisure, social and cultural activities • social contact • housing • accessibility in the home • accessibility of public services • domestic life and social care • discrimination • crime • impairments and health conditions • disability as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act • income and benefits Information about impairments and health conditions of children aged 11 to 15 was collected by parental proxy.


Information on publications is available from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) website: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
And this includes information on Wave One findings: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
_wor_results

Coverage


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments The sample size of Wave One (2009-2011) is 46,693 cases (households that include 10 or more people have been removed from the data) [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009-2011


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


None, although detailed spatial data are available under Special License


Adults aged 16 and over (as well as some information about children aged 11-15)


Representative of all people aged 16 and over in (private) households in Great Britain. Parents or guardians will also be asked to provide some key data about children, aged 11 to 15. Children will be able to take part in a face-to-face interview when they reach age 16. The design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: a disabled group, a comparison group of non-disabled people, and a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time. The data include weighting variables


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments In 2007 the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) commissioned the ONS to develop a new longitudinal survey of disability. The LOS is a longitudinal survey. This means it will track the experiences of disabled people over time to assess transitions through key life stages, such as moving from childhood to adulthood or in and out of work. It is the first major ONS social survey to explore disability in terms of the social barriers to participation that people experience. The survey compares the experiences of disabled people with those of non-disabled people. The longitudinal design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: • disabled group • comparison group of non-disabled people • a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time Respondents will be interviewed every 12 months, whether they are resident in the original household or have since moved. Following the baseline survey only the first two groups will be interviewed face-to-face. The third group will be monitored over time via a shorter telephone interview to check for the onset of an impairment. If any member of the household has experienced the onset of impairment, they will be invited to take part in a face to face interview. Further information about the LOS series is available from the ONS. The first part is the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) core module. The core module collects basic demographic information and other household information for all members of the household. The second part of the questionnaire is the LOS module. This module is administered to each adult in the household and they are asked questions about: • education and training • employment • economic life and living standards • transport • leisure, social and cultural activities • social contact • housing • accessibility in the home • accessibility of public services • domestic life and social care • discrimination • crime • impairments and health conditions • disability as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act • income and benefits Information about impairments and health conditions of children aged 11 to 15 was collected by parental proxy.


Information on publications is available from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) website: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
And this includes information on Wave One findings: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
_wor_results

Coverage


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments The sample size of Wave One (2009-2011) is 46,693 cases (households that include 10 or more people have been removed from the data) [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009-2011


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


None, although detailed spatial data are available under Special License


Adults aged 16 and over (as well as some information about children aged 11-15)


Representative of all people aged 16 and over in (private) households in Great Britain. Parents or guardians will also be asked to provide some key data about children, aged 11 to 15. Children will be able to take part in a face-to-face interview when they reach age 16. The design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: a disabled group, a comparison group of non-disabled people, and a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time. The data include weighting variables


The last major survey of disability in Great Britain was the Disability Follow-up to the 1996/97 Family Resources Survey (available at the UK Data Archive). Prior to that were the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (OPCS) national surveys of disability carried out during 1985-88 (also available from the Archive). In 2005, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) sponsored a feasibility study which recommended that a new dedicated disability survey was required. The new survey was needed to meet the following long term information needs on experiences of disabled people living in Great Britain: • dynamics of disability over time, including the factors associated with transitions and onsets of impairment • social participation by disabled people • up-to-date prevalence rates of impairments In 2007 the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) commissioned the ONS to develop a new longitudinal survey of disability. The LOS is a longitudinal survey. This means it will track the experiences of disabled people over time to assess transitions through key life stages, such as moving from childhood to adulthood or in and out of work. It is the first major ONS social survey to explore disability in terms of the social barriers to participation that people experience. The survey compares the experiences of disabled people with those of non-disabled people. The longitudinal design enables three distinct groups to be followed over time: • disabled group • comparison group of non-disabled people • a larger non-disabled group, monitored for the onset of impairment over time Respondents will be interviewed every 12 months, whether they are resident in the original household or have since moved. Following the baseline survey only the first two groups will be interviewed face-to-face. The third group will be monitored over time via a shorter telephone interview to check for the onset of an impairment. If any member of the household has experienced the onset of impairment, they will be invited to take part in a face to face interview. Further information about the LOS series is available from the ONS. The first part is the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) core module. The core module collects basic demographic information and other household information for all members of the household. The second part of the questionnaire is the LOS module. This module is administered to each adult in the household and they are asked questions about: • education and training • employment • economic life and living standards • transport • leisure, social and cultural activities • social contact • housing • accessibility in the home • accessibility of public services • domestic life and social care • discrimination • crime • impairments and health conditions • disability as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act • income and benefits Information about impairments and health conditions of children aged 11 to 15 was collected by parental proxy.


Information on publications is available from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) website: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
And this includes information on Wave One findings: statistics.dwp.gov.uk/.../index.php?page=los
_wor_results


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised


Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


LOS is the first major government survey to explore disability in terms of social barriers across Britain (England, Scotland and Wales). The survey has been designed to find out about the interaction of social barriers with impairments. The survey also measures the prevalence of different impairments and conditions and collects information on those who have entitlements under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). In addition, the survey also collects information on all equality strands, not just disability. Previous surveys have defined disability using a medical model approach which says that restrictions and limitations in the lives of disabled people are a direct result of their impairment. This definition differs from the social model which focuses on how a person is ‘disabled’ by the barriers imposed upon them by society. Data for a variety of definitions of disability can be delivered by the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS). Outputs can be produced based on a 'social barriers' definition where people are categorised as disabled only if they are disadvantaged by the way in which the wider environment restricts their participation. Outputs can also be provided on medical conditions or impairments by examining the answers to questions about body function or structure. In particular LOS will fill the following evidence gaps: • Prevalence of disability in Britain from a multi-dimensional perspective, including the DDA definition plus detailed information on types of impairment, levels of severity and social barriers. • Data to support outcome based indicators to underpin the cross-government target to achieve substantive equality by 2025. • Information on what happens when people become disabled and the relationship between change in impairment status and subsequent outcomes.

Applicability


LOS is the first major government survey to explore disability in terms of social barriers across Britain (England, Scotland and Wales). The survey has been designed to find out about the interaction of social barriers with impairments. The survey also measures the prevalence of different impairments and conditions and collects information on those who have entitlements under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). In addition, the survey also collects information on all equality strands, not just disability. Previous surveys have defined disability using a medical model approach which says that restrictions and limitations in the lives of disabled people are a direct result of their impairment. This definition differs from the social model which focuses on how a person is ‘disabled’ by the barriers imposed upon them by society. Data for a variety of definitions of disability can be delivered by the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS). Outputs can be produced based on a 'social barriers' definition where people are categorised as disabled only if they are disadvantaged by the way in which the wider environment restricts their participation. Outputs can also be provided on medical conditions or impairments by examining the answers to questions about body function or structure. In particular LOS will fill the following evidence gaps: • Prevalence of disability in Britain from a multi-dimensional perspective, including the DDA definition plus detailed information on types of impairment, levels of severity and social barriers. • Data to support outcome based indicators to underpin the cross-government target to achieve substantive equality by 2025. • Information on what happens when people become disabled and the relationship between change in impairment status and subsequent outcomes.

Applicability


LOS is the first major government survey to explore disability in terms of social barriers across Britain (England, Scotland and Wales). The survey has been designed to find out about the interaction of social barriers with impairments. The survey also measures the prevalence of different impairments and conditions and collects information on those who have entitlements under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). In addition, the survey also collects information on all equality strands, not just disability. Previous surveys have defined disability using a medical model approach which says that restrictions and limitations in the lives of disabled people are a direct result of their impairment. This definition differs from the social model which focuses on how a person is ‘disabled’ by the barriers imposed upon them by society. Data for a variety of definitions of disability can be delivered by the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS). Outputs can be produced based on a 'social barriers' definition where people are categorised as disabled only if they are disadvantaged by the way in which the wider environment restricts their participation. Outputs can also be provided on medical conditions or impairments by examining the answers to questions about body function or structure. In particular LOS will fill the following evidence gaps: • Prevalence of disability in Britain from a multi-dimensional perspective, including the DDA definition plus detailed information on types of impairment, levels of severity and social barriers. • Data to support outcome based indicators to underpin the cross-government target to achieve substantive equality by 2025. • Information on what happens when people become disabled and the relationship between change in impairment status and subsequent outcomes.

Applicability


LOS is the first major government survey to explore disability in terms of social barriers across Britain (England, Scotland and Wales). The survey has been designed to find out about the interaction of social barriers with impairments. The survey also measures the prevalence of different impairments and conditions and collects information on those who have entitlements under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). In addition, the survey also collects information on all equality strands, not just disability. Previous surveys have defined disability using a medical model approach which says that restrictions and limitations in the lives of disabled people are a direct result of their impairment. This definition differs from the social model which focuses on how a person is ‘disabled’ by the barriers imposed upon them by society. Data for a variety of definitions of disability can be delivered by the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS). Outputs can be produced based on a 'social barriers' definition where people are categorised as disabled only if they are disadvantaged by the way in which the wider environment restricts their participation. Outputs can also be provided on medical conditions or impairments by examining the answers to questions about body function or structure. In particular LOS will fill the following evidence gaps: • Prevalence of disability in Britain from a multi-dimensional perspective, including the DDA definition plus detailed information on types of impairment, levels of severity and social barriers. • Data to support outcome based indicators to underpin the cross-government target to achieve substantive equality by 2025. • Information on what happens when people become disabled and the relationship between change in impairment status and subsequent outcomes.

Applicability


LOS is the first major government survey to explore disability in terms of social barriers across Britain (England, Scotland and Wales). The survey has been designed to find out about the interaction of social barriers with impairments. The survey also measures the prevalence of different impairments and conditions and collects information on those who have entitlements under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). In addition, the survey also collects information on all equality strands, not just disability. Previous surveys have defined disability using a medical model approach which says that restrictions and limitations in the lives of disabled people are a direct result of their impairment. This definition differs from the social model which focuses on how a person is ‘disabled’ by the barriers imposed upon them by society. Data for a variety of definitions of disability can be delivered by the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS). Outputs can be produced based on a 'social barriers' definition where people are categorised as disabled only if they are disadvantaged by the way in which the wider environment restricts their participation. Outputs can also be provided on medical conditions or impairments by examining the answers to questions about body function or structure. In particular LOS will fill the following evidence gaps: • Prevalence of disability in Britain from a multi-dimensional perspective, including the DDA definition plus detailed information on types of impairment, levels of severity and social barriers. • Data to support outcome based indicators to underpin the cross-government target to achieve substantive equality by 2025. • Information on what happens when people become disabled and the relationship between change in impairment status and subsequent outcomes.

Applicability


LOS is the first major government survey to explore disability in terms of social barriers across Britain (England, Scotland and Wales). The survey has been designed to find out about the interaction of social barriers with impairments. The survey also measures the prevalence of different impairments and conditions and collects information on those who have entitlements under the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). In addition, the survey also collects information on all equality strands, not just disability. Previous surveys have defined disability using a medical model approach which says that restrictions and limitations in the lives of disabled people are a direct result of their impairment. This definition differs from the social model which focuses on how a person is ‘disabled’ by the barriers imposed upon them by society. Data for a variety of definitions of disability can be delivered by the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS). Outputs can be produced based on a 'social barriers' definition where people are categorised as disabled only if they are disadvantaged by the way in which the wider environment restricts their participation. Outputs can also be provided on medical conditions or impairments by examining the answers to questions about body function or structure. In particular LOS will fill the following evidence gaps: • Prevalence of disability in Britain from a multi-dimensional perspective, including the DDA definition plus detailed information on types of impairment, levels of severity and social barriers. • Data to support outcome based indicators to underpin the cross-government target to achieve substantive equality by 2025. • Information on what happens when people become disabled and the relationship between change in impairment status and subsequent outcomes.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Mike Murphy
  • (see Partners)