Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70)
1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70)

Topic
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Work and Productivity
Education and Learning
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Uses of Technology
Wellbeing
Intergenerational Relationships
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Education
University of London
20 Bedford Way
WC1H 0AL London
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0)207 612 6875
Fax: +44 (0)207 612 6880
Email: cls(at)ioe.ac.uk
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Timeliness, transparency

Timetables vary according to the data collected in each wave

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


The way that the data is collected changes for each wave. For example, the 1970 wave collected data from the midwife who had undertaken delivery of the cohort member and information was then also obtained from routine health records. Later waves collected information from parents, school class and head teacher questionnaires. In 2012, telephone interviews are planned in order to collect information from cohort members. For more information, see the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) website: http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/default.aspx


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
Additional special conditions of use also apply. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases.


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Coverage


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) began as the British Births Survey (BBS), collecting data on the births and families of just under 17,200 babies born in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in a particular week in April 1970. The BBS was sponsored by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. After the initial birth survey, Northern Irish participants were dropped from the sample. Since BCS70 began, there have been seven full data collection exercises in order to monitor the cohort members' health, education, social and economic circumstances. These took place when respondents were aged 5, in 1975, aged 10, in 1980, aged 16, in 1986, aged 26, in 1996, aged 30, 1999-2000, and aged 34, in 2004-2005. The first two sweeps (at 5 and 10 years) were carried out by the Department of Child Health at Bristol University. During these times, the survey was known as the Child Health and Education Study (CHES). The 16-year survey was carried out by the International Centre for Child Studies and named Youthscan. The Social Statistics Research Unit (SSRU) became involved with the BCS70 study at this time, and eventually changed its name to the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), based at the Institute of Education, University of London. With each successive attempt, the scope of BCS70 has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years and beyond. Further information about the BCS70 and may be found on the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website. As well as BCS70, the CLS now also conducts the NCDS series. A range of sub-sample and supplementary surveys have also been conducted, such as the Ten-year Follow-up Special Needs Survey and a supplementary survey of head teachers at the time of the 16-year follow-up in 1986. A related study, Coding of Text Data from BCS70 at 10 and 16 Years: Health Care Utilisation of School Aged Children, 1970-1986, is also held by the Archive. The aim of this project was to code text variables from BCS70 files, selected from the ten- and 16-year follow-ups to provide information about health care utilisation by the target age group. The BCS70 follows the lives of all people born in England, Scotland and Wales in one particular week of April 1970. The BCS70 has both longitudinal and cross-sectional samples. Longitudinal samples • The longitudinal target sample consists of all those born (including stillbirths) in Great Britain in the particular week, until they die or permanently emigrate from Britain. The longitudinal achieved sample is all those members of the longitudinal target sample who participate in a particular sweep (meaning at least one survey instrument partially completed). Cross-sectional samples • The cross-sectional target sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). • The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986. The thirty-eight year follow-up (BCS8) had a sample size of 8,874 cases


1970


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is not stratified.


All children in England, Scotland and Wales born in one week in 1970 In later sweeps, the cohort was augmented by additional children who were born outside Great Britain but within the target week in 1970. This additional (cross-sectional) sample for each sweep consists of all those born anywhere in the world in the same week as the longitudinal sample, who are living in Britain at the time of the sweep, and who joined the NCDS sample during the school years. The cross-sectional achieved sample is all those members of the cross-sectional target sample who participate in a particular sweep (at least one survey instrument partially completed). The cross-sectional sample only includes immigrants who moved to Britain before the age of 16, as there were no attempts to include further members beyond the age 16 survey in 1986.


Great Britain


The age of birth cohort study members varies over time. At the last wave of data collection, cohort members were 38 years old.


Representative of the 1970 birth cohort who were born in Great Britain


The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS) is a continuing, multi-disciplinary longitudinal survey monitoring the development of babies born in the UK in one particular week in April 1970. The BCS was first called the British Births Survey and was carried out by the National Birthday Trust Fund in association with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Its aims were to look at the social and biological characteristics of the mother in relation to neonatal morbidity, and to compare the results with those of the 1958 National Child Development Study. With each successive sweep, the scope of the enquiry has broadened from a strictly medical focus at birth, to encompass physical and educational development at the age of 5, physical, educational and social development at the ages of 10 and 16, and physical, educational, social and economic development at 26 years. Waves of data have been collected from the cohort members in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008. The next follow up will take place in 2012 when the members will be 42. This follow up is currently ongoing and information is not yet available on the UK Data Archive.


There have been hundreds of published journal articles, books, chapters, reports or conference presentations based on data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70). The following resources can help you find what material has been published on different topics. • The CLS bibliography: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Bibliography.aspx
• CLS working papers: www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/page.aspx
• The UK Data Service: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html


Data are anonymised


Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response and attrition, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of cohort studies. There are incomplete data for some individuals in some waves. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source, although different data has been gathered at different time-points over the life of the birth cohort.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking

Applicability


There are over 15,000 different variables in the BCS covering some of the following topics: • Wave 1 (Birth) 1970: Social, biological and medical features of the mother and baby. • Wave 2 (Five year follow up) 1975: Behaviour of child and maternal depression. • Wave 3 (Ten year follow up) 1980: Child medical history, child at school and skills, attitudes towards various life events. • Wave 4 (Sixteen year follow up) 1986:Arthimetic, school history, exercise, diet, health, social features. • Wave 5 (Twenty-six year follow up) 1996: Qualifications and skills, training, employment relationships, health. • Wave 6 (Thirty year follow up) 2000: Household, housing, employment, health, opinions on various events. • Wave 7 (Thirty-four year follow up): Housing, employment, health, education, attitudes, skills, computer use. • Wave 8 (Thirty-eight year follow up): Housing, relationships, births, family, education, health. These are not definitive lists. For detailed information on the variables available visit the UK Data Service website. In the past, certain waves of the study have been linked with health records. More information about the data collected in each of the waves is available from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies website here. It may be possible to link the BCS to administrative datasets and other datasets / surveys. This will need to be discussed at the time of application. The 1970 British Cohort Study: Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-up, 2008-2009 was conducted when respondents were aged 38. The latest sweep was conducted for the first time as a telephone interview (CATI). The main aim of the most recent survey was to explore the factors central to the formation and maintenance of adult identity in each of the following domains: • lifelong learning • relationships, parenting and housing • employment and income • health and health behaviour • citizenship and values For the third edition (May 2013) a new derived variables data file was deposited with accompanying documentation. The survey explored the following areas: • housing • relationship history • births and other pregnancies • periods of lone parenthood • children and the wider family (social relationships and support) • family income • employment status/employment history • academic education • general health • smoking


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Mike Murphy
  • (see Partners)