Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Integrated Household Survey (IHS)
Integrated Household Survey (IHS)

Topic
Wellbeing
Work and Productivity
Education and Learning
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Office for National Statistics
Customer Contact Centre
Government Buildings, Cardiff Road
NP10 8XG Newport, South Wales
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1633 455678.
Email: socialsurveys(at)ons.gsi.gov.uk
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Timeliness, transparency

Data should be available around 6 months after the end of fieldwork

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Face-to-face interview; Telephone interview


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The SL data have more restrictive access conditions than those made available under the standard EUL. Prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked on a number of social surveys conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to produce a dataset of 'core' variables. The aim of the IHS is to produce high-level estimates for particular themes to a higher precision and lower geographic level than current ONS social surveys. The 'core' set contains around 100 questions, but a respondent is only asked a proportion of those depending on routing from answers to questions. The core questions are asked, where possible, at the beginning of the component surveys. IHS prior to 2009: A set of core questions were introduced within three surveys in January 2008; the General Lifestyle Survey, Living Costs and Food Survey and the Opinions Survey. In April 2008 the IHS core questions were introduced on the English Housing Survey, bringing the family of modules on the IHS up to four. The IHS data for 2008-2009 was used as a pilot for the concept, developing the systems and designing the weighting methodology. The IHS data for that period have not been published as they do not provide better quality information than that within existing surveys. Hence, the earliest IHS data currently available from the UK Data Archive cover 2009-2010. IHS from 2009-2010: In April 2009 the IHS core questions were introduced on the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS) questionnaires, though not all the core IHS questions were fully harmonised on the LFS. From June 2009 the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) was included in the IHS family of modules. With the inclusion of these new surveys the IHS became complete, with an achieved annual sample size of approximately 450,000 individuals from interviews undertaken in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Therefore, the first IHS dataset to be released covers the period April 2009 - March 2010, starting the IHS data series from the point that all surveys were included. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is partially stratified.


Each of the surveys comprising the IHS have their own sampling design, meaning that the IHS includes clustered and non-clustered, multistage and single stage component samples and also cross-sectional and longitudinal data.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License (including NUTS2 and NUTS3) The more detailed geographic variables present include county, unitary/local authority, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions and Training and Enterprise Councils (TECs).


All ages


Representative of all persons resident in the UK in private households, and young people living away from the parental home in student halls of residence or similar institutions during term time. The data include weighting variables


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked in a number of Office for National Statistics (ONS) social surveys to gather basic information for a very large number of households. The aim of the IHS is to produce estimates for particular themes to a higher level of precision and at a lower geographic level than is possible in individual ONS social surveys. More robust local information will improve the monitoring of important information between censuses for a range of policy purposes. The IHS core questions cover several themes. These include: • economic activity • education • health and disability • identity • income The IHS was also the first survey to report on Sexual Identity in the UK. Users should note that there are two versions of each IHS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains more detailed variables relating to age, age of youngest dependent child, country of birth, family unit type, household and household reference person, industry class, sub-class and division, month left last job, cohabitation, country of residence history, multiple households at address, nationality, New Deal training types, National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) long version, qualifications, household relationships, minor Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groups, sexual identity, training and working age. Users should note that the user guide also mentions variables that are not included in either the EUL or SL datasets held at the Archive. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, the lowest geography available is Government Office Region, only major (3-digit) SOC groups are included for main, second and last job, and only industry sector for main, second and last job. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users who require more detailed geographies will need to fill out an application to use the Special Licence version of the IHS). From April 2009 - March 2010 the IHS contained data collected from the following surveys: • General Lifestyle Survey (GLF) • Living Costs and Food Survey (LCF) • Opinions Survey (OPN) - removed January 2010 • English Housing Survey (EHS) - removed April 2011 • Labour Force Survey/Annual Population Survey (LFS/APS) • Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) - removed April 2011 However, in January 2010 the OPN survey was removed from the IHS. This was designed to shorten interview length of the OPN. Then from April 2011, the EHS and LOS were also removed. Further information about the IHS may be found on the ONS website.


Currently, there is no readily available information. Information on publications should be available from the Office for National Statistics.

Coverage


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked on a number of social surveys conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to produce a dataset of 'core' variables. The aim of the IHS is to produce high-level estimates for particular themes to a higher precision and lower geographic level than current ONS social surveys. The 'core' set contains around 100 questions, but a respondent is only asked a proportion of those depending on routing from answers to questions. The core questions are asked, where possible, at the beginning of the component surveys. IHS prior to 2009: A set of core questions were introduced within three surveys in January 2008; the General Lifestyle Survey, Living Costs and Food Survey and the Opinions Survey. In April 2008 the IHS core questions were introduced on the English Housing Survey, bringing the family of modules on the IHS up to four. The IHS data for 2008-2009 was used as a pilot for the concept, developing the systems and designing the weighting methodology. The IHS data for that period have not been published as they do not provide better quality information than that within existing surveys. Hence, the earliest IHS data currently available from the UK Data Archive cover 2009-2010. IHS from 2009-2010: In April 2009 the IHS core questions were introduced on the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS) questionnaires, though not all the core IHS questions were fully harmonised on the LFS. From June 2009 the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) was included in the IHS family of modules. With the inclusion of these new surveys the IHS became complete, with an achieved annual sample size of approximately 450,000 individuals from interviews undertaken in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Therefore, the first IHS dataset to be released covers the period April 2009 - March 2010, starting the IHS data series from the point that all surveys were included. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is partially stratified.


Each of the surveys comprising the IHS have their own sampling design, meaning that the IHS includes clustered and non-clustered, multistage and single stage component samples and also cross-sectional and longitudinal data.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License (including NUTS2 and NUTS3) The more detailed geographic variables present include county, unitary/local authority, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions and Training and Enterprise Councils (TECs).


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland)


Representative of all persons resident in the UK in private households, and young people living away from the parental home in student halls of residence or similar institutions during term time. The data include weighting variables


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked in a number of Office for National Statistics (ONS) social surveys to gather basic information for a very large number of households. The aim of the IHS is to produce estimates for particular themes to a higher level of precision and at a lower geographic level than is possible in individual ONS social surveys. More robust local information will improve the monitoring of important information between censuses for a range of policy purposes. The IHS core questions cover several themes. These include: • economic activity • education • health and disability • identity • income The IHS was also the first survey to report on Sexual Identity in the UK. Users should note that there are two versions of each IHS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains more detailed variables relating to age, age of youngest dependent child, country of birth, family unit type, household and household reference person, industry class, sub-class and division, month left last job, cohabitation, country of residence history, multiple households at address, nationality, New Deal training types, National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) long version, qualifications, household relationships, minor Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groups, sexual identity, training and working age. Users should note that the user guide also mentions variables that are not included in either the EUL or SL datasets held at the Archive. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, the lowest geography available is Government Office Region, only major (3-digit) SOC groups are included for main, second and last job, and only industry sector for main, second and last job. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users who require more detailed geographies will need to fill out an application to use the Special Licence version of the IHS). From April 2009 - March 2010 the IHS contained data collected from the following surveys: • General Lifestyle Survey (GLF) • Living Costs and Food Survey (LCF) • Opinions Survey (OPN) - removed January 2010 • English Housing Survey (EHS) - removed April 2011 • Labour Force Survey/Annual Population Survey (LFS/APS) • Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) - removed April 2011 However, in January 2010 the OPN survey was removed from the IHS. This was designed to shorten interview length of the OPN. Then from April 2011, the EHS and LOS were also removed. Further information about the IHS may be found on the ONS website.


Currently, there is no readily available information. Information on publications should be available from the Office for National Statistics.

Coverage


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked on a number of social surveys conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to produce a dataset of 'core' variables. The aim of the IHS is to produce high-level estimates for particular themes to a higher precision and lower geographic level than current ONS social surveys. The 'core' set contains around 100 questions, but a respondent is only asked a proportion of those depending on routing from answers to questions. The core questions are asked, where possible, at the beginning of the component surveys. IHS prior to 2009: A set of core questions were introduced within three surveys in January 2008; the General Lifestyle Survey, Living Costs and Food Survey and the Opinions Survey. In April 2008 the IHS core questions were introduced on the English Housing Survey, bringing the family of modules on the IHS up to four. The IHS data for 2008-2009 was used as a pilot for the concept, developing the systems and designing the weighting methodology. The IHS data for that period have not been published as they do not provide better quality information than that within existing surveys. Hence, the earliest IHS data currently available from the UK Data Archive cover 2009-2010. IHS from 2009-2010: In April 2009 the IHS core questions were introduced on the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS) questionnaires, though not all the core IHS questions were fully harmonised on the LFS. From June 2009 the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) was included in the IHS family of modules. With the inclusion of these new surveys the IHS became complete, with an achieved annual sample size of approximately 450,000 individuals from interviews undertaken in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Therefore, the first IHS dataset to be released covers the period April 2009 - March 2010, starting the IHS data series from the point that all surveys were included. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is partially stratified.


Each of the surveys comprising the IHS have their own sampling design, meaning that the IHS includes clustered and non-clustered, multistage and single stage component samples and also cross-sectional and longitudinal data.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License (including NUTS2 and NUTS3) The more detailed geographic variables present include county, unitary/local authority, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions and Training and Enterprise Councils (TECs).


All ages


Representative of all persons resident in the UK in private households, and young people living away from the parental home in student halls of residence or similar institutions during term time. The data include weighting variables


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked in a number of Office for National Statistics (ONS) social surveys to gather basic information for a very large number of households. The aim of the IHS is to produce estimates for particular themes to a higher level of precision and at a lower geographic level than is possible in individual ONS social surveys. More robust local information will improve the monitoring of important information between censuses for a range of policy purposes. The IHS core questions cover several themes. These include: • economic activity • education • health and disability • identity • income The IHS was also the first survey to report on Sexual Identity in the UK. Users should note that there are two versions of each IHS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains more detailed variables relating to age, age of youngest dependent child, country of birth, family unit type, household and household reference person, industry class, sub-class and division, month left last job, cohabitation, country of residence history, multiple households at address, nationality, New Deal training types, National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) long version, qualifications, household relationships, minor Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groups, sexual identity, training and working age. Users should note that the user guide also mentions variables that are not included in either the EUL or SL datasets held at the Archive. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, the lowest geography available is Government Office Region, only major (3-digit) SOC groups are included for main, second and last job, and only industry sector for main, second and last job. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users who require more detailed geographies will need to fill out an application to use the Special Licence version of the IHS). From April 2009 - March 2010 the IHS contained data collected from the following surveys: • General Lifestyle Survey (GLF) • Living Costs and Food Survey (LCF) • Opinions Survey (OPN) - removed January 2010 • English Housing Survey (EHS) - removed April 2011 • Labour Force Survey/Annual Population Survey (LFS/APS) • Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) - removed April 2011 However, in January 2010 the OPN survey was removed from the IHS. This was designed to shorten interview length of the OPN. Then from April 2011, the EHS and LOS were also removed. Further information about the IHS may be found on the ONS website.


Currently, there is no readily available information. Information on publications should be available from the Office for National Statistics.

Coverage


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked on a number of social surveys conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to produce a dataset of 'core' variables. The aim of the IHS is to produce high-level estimates for particular themes to a higher precision and lower geographic level than current ONS social surveys. The 'core' set contains around 100 questions, but a respondent is only asked a proportion of those depending on routing from answers to questions. The core questions are asked, where possible, at the beginning of the component surveys. IHS prior to 2009: A set of core questions were introduced within three surveys in January 2008; the General Lifestyle Survey, Living Costs and Food Survey and the Opinions Survey. In April 2008 the IHS core questions were introduced on the English Housing Survey, bringing the family of modules on the IHS up to four. The IHS data for 2008-2009 was used as a pilot for the concept, developing the systems and designing the weighting methodology. The IHS data for that period have not been published as they do not provide better quality information than that within existing surveys. Hence, the earliest IHS data currently available from the UK Data Archive cover 2009-2010. IHS from 2009-2010: In April 2009 the IHS core questions were introduced on the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Annual Population Survey (APS) questionnaires, though not all the core IHS questions were fully harmonised on the LFS. From June 2009 the Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) was included in the IHS family of modules. With the inclusion of these new surveys the IHS became complete, with an achieved annual sample size of approximately 450,000 individuals from interviews undertaken in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Therefore, the first IHS dataset to be released covers the period April 2009 - March 2010, starting the IHS data series from the point that all surveys were included. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


2009


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is partially stratified.


Each of the surveys comprising the IHS have their own sampling design, meaning that the IHS includes clustered and non-clustered, multistage and single stage component samples and also cross-sectional and longitudinal data.


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1) More detailed spatial data are available under Special License (including NUTS2 and NUTS3) The more detailed geographic variables present include county, unitary/local authority, Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) and NUTS3 regions and Training and Enterprise Councils (TECs).


All ages


Representative of all persons resident in the UK in private households, and young people living away from the parental home in student halls of residence or similar institutions during term time. The data include weighting variables


The Integrated Household Survey (IHS) is a composite survey combining questions asked in a number of Office for National Statistics (ONS) social surveys to gather basic information for a very large number of households. The aim of the IHS is to produce estimates for particular themes to a higher level of precision and at a lower geographic level than is possible in individual ONS social surveys. More robust local information will improve the monitoring of important information between censuses for a range of policy purposes. The IHS core questions cover several themes. These include: • economic activity • education • health and disability • identity • income The IHS was also the first survey to report on Sexual Identity in the UK. Users should note that there are two versions of each IHS study. One is available under the standard End User Licence (EUL) agreement, and the other is a Special Licence (SL) version. The SL version contains more detailed variables relating to age, age of youngest dependent child, country of birth, family unit type, household and household reference person, industry class, sub-class and division, month left last job, cohabitation, country of residence history, multiple households at address, nationality, New Deal training types, National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) long version, qualifications, household relationships, minor Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) groups, sexual identity, training and working age. Users should note that the user guide also mentions variables that are not included in either the EUL or SL datasets held at the Archive. The EUL version contains less detailed variables. For example, the lowest geography available is Government Office Region, only major (3-digit) SOC groups are included for main, second and last job, and only industry sector for main, second and last job. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users who require more detailed geographies will need to fill out an application to use the Special Licence version of the IHS). From April 2009 - March 2010 the IHS contained data collected from the following surveys: • General Lifestyle Survey (GLF) • Living Costs and Food Survey (LCF) • Opinions Survey (OPN) - removed January 2010 • English Housing Survey (EHS) - removed April 2011 • Labour Force Survey/Annual Population Survey (LFS/APS) • Life Opportunities Survey (LOS) - removed April 2011 However, in January 2010 the OPN survey was removed from the IHS. This was designed to shorten interview length of the OPN. Then from April 2011, the EHS and LOS were also removed. Further information about the IHS may be found on the ONS website.


Currently, there is no readily available information. Information on publications should be available from the Office for National Statistics.


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not available.


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not available.


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not available.


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not available.


Data are anonymised


Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
The ONS have provided the following information for users of the IHS: "All IHS statistics are designated as experimental. Experimental statistics are new official statistics undergoing evaluation. They are published in order to involve customers and stakeholders in their development and as a mean to build in quality at an early stage. As the data are experimental ONS recommends that any publication of the IHS data should state the experimental branding. Where possible the source of the National Statistic for the estimate being published should also be referenced." For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
The ONS have provided the following information for users of the IHS: "All IHS statistics are designated as experimental. Experimental statistics are new official statistics undergoing evaluation. They are published in order to involve customers and stakeholders in their development and as a mean to build in quality at an early stage. As the data are experimental ONS recommends that any publication of the IHS data should state the experimental branding. Where possible the source of the National Statistic for the estimate being published should also be referenced." For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
The ONS have provided the following information for users of the IHS: "All IHS statistics are designated as experimental. Experimental statistics are new official statistics undergoing evaluation. They are published in order to involve customers and stakeholders in their development and as a mean to build in quality at an early stage. As the data are experimental ONS recommends that any publication of the IHS data should state the experimental branding. Where possible the source of the National Statistic for the estimate being published should also be referenced." For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
The ONS have provided the following information for users of the IHS: "All IHS statistics are designated as experimental. Experimental statistics are new official statistics undergoing evaluation. They are published in order to involve customers and stakeholders in their development and as a mean to build in quality at an early stage. As the data are experimental ONS recommends that any publication of the IHS data should state the experimental branding. Where possible the source of the National Statistic for the estimate being published should also be referenced." For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


The IHS has been developed by ONS to be a cost-effective way of obtaining a very large dataset on a number of topics at lower geographic levels than can be obtained by other ONS social surveys. IHS data have been supplied to the following government departments: • Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) • Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) • Department for Health (DoH) • Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) • Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) Data have also been sent to the devolved governments in Scotland and Wales and to the UK Data Archive. IHS from 2009-2010: The large sample size and UK-wide coverage means various geographical breakdowns are possible in the IHS, and it is possible to use a geographical hierarchy to drill down to lower level detail within an area. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users should note that while income data are collected within the IHS and questions are included in the questionnaire, ONS have so far not been able to harmonise the income variables across the different surveys that comprise the IHS. Therefore, there are currently no income variables included in the EUL or SL datasets deposited at the Archive; the variables are only included in the Government Statistical Services (GSS) client and ONS internal research datasets. Strengths include: • The main strength of the IHS is in its large sample size; with 450,000 individuals in 190,000 households, it is the largest ONS social survey and allows for local area analysis of IHS topics. Limitations include: • The IHS dataset size is variable as it will fluctuate according to which component surveys contribute to the IHS, and according to their response rates. • The IHS is an experimental dataset, and the weighting methodology will be assessed and potentially revised during this experimental period. • Questions need to be harmonised across all component surveys while maintaining historic outputs: this increases the timescale for implementing and testing new questions.

Applicability


The IHS has been developed by ONS to be a cost-effective way of obtaining a very large dataset on a number of topics at lower geographic levels than can be obtained by other ONS social surveys. IHS data have been supplied to the following government departments: • Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) • Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) • Department for Health (DoH) • Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) • Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) Data have also been sent to the devolved governments in Scotland and Wales and to the UK Data Archive. IHS from 2009-2010: The large sample size and UK-wide coverage means various geographical breakdowns are possible in the IHS, and it is possible to use a geographical hierarchy to drill down to lower level detail within an area. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users should note that while income data are collected within the IHS and questions are included in the questionnaire, ONS have so far not been able to harmonise the income variables across the different surveys that comprise the IHS. Therefore, there are currently no income variables included in the EUL or SL datasets deposited at the Archive; the variables are only included in the Government Statistical Services (GSS) client and ONS internal research datasets. Strengths include: • The main strength of the IHS is in its large sample size; with 450,000 individuals in 190,000 households, it is the largest ONS social survey and allows for local area analysis of IHS topics. Limitations include: • The IHS dataset size is variable as it will fluctuate according to which component surveys contribute to the IHS, and according to their response rates. • The IHS is an experimental dataset, and the weighting methodology will be assessed and potentially revised during this experimental period. • Questions need to be harmonised across all component surveys while maintaining historic outputs: this increases the timescale for implementing and testing new questions.

Applicability


The IHS has been developed by ONS to be a cost-effective way of obtaining a very large dataset on a number of topics at lower geographic levels than can be obtained by other ONS social surveys. IHS data have been supplied to the following government departments: • Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) • Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) • Department for Health (DoH) • Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) • Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) Data have also been sent to the devolved governments in Scotland and Wales and to the UK Data Archive. IHS from 2009-2010: The large sample size and UK-wide coverage means various geographical breakdowns are possible in the IHS, and it is possible to use a geographical hierarchy to drill down to lower level detail within an area. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users should note that while income data are collected within the IHS and questions are included in the questionnaire, ONS have so far not been able to harmonise the income variables across the different surveys that comprise the IHS. Therefore, there are currently no income variables included in the EUL or SL datasets deposited at the Archive; the variables are only included in the Government Statistical Services (GSS) client and ONS internal research datasets. Strengths include: • The main strength of the IHS is in its large sample size; with 450,000 individuals in 190,000 households, it is the largest ONS social survey and allows for local area analysis of IHS topics. Limitations include: • The IHS dataset size is variable as it will fluctuate according to which component surveys contribute to the IHS, and according to their response rates. • The IHS is an experimental dataset, and the weighting methodology will be assessed and potentially revised during this experimental period. • Questions need to be harmonised across all component surveys while maintaining historic outputs: this increases the timescale for implementing and testing new questions.

Applicability


The IHS has been developed by ONS to be a cost-effective way of obtaining a very large dataset on a number of topics at lower geographic levels than can be obtained by other ONS social surveys. IHS data have been supplied to the following government departments: • Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) • Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) • Department for Health (DoH) • Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) • Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) Data have also been sent to the devolved governments in Scotland and Wales and to the UK Data Archive. IHS from 2009-2010: The large sample size and UK-wide coverage means various geographical breakdowns are possible in the IHS, and it is possible to use a geographical hierarchy to drill down to lower level detail within an area. (It should be noted that the lowest geographic level available on the standard access End User Licence IHS dataset is Government Office Region (GOR). Users should note that while income data are collected within the IHS and questions are included in the questionnaire, ONS have so far not been able to harmonise the income variables across the different surveys that comprise the IHS. Therefore, there are currently no income variables included in the EUL or SL datasets deposited at the Archive; the variables are only included in the Government Statistical Services (GSS) client and ONS internal research datasets. Strengths include: • The main strength of the IHS is in its large sample size; with 450,000 individuals in 190,000 households, it is the largest ONS social survey and allows for local area analysis of IHS topics. Limitations include: • The IHS dataset size is variable as it will fluctuate according to which component surveys contribute to the IHS, and according to their response rates. • The IHS is an experimental dataset, and the weighting methodology will be assessed and potentially revised during this experimental period. • Questions need to be harmonised across all component surveys while maintaining historic outputs: this increases the timescale for implementing and testing new questions.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Mike Murphy
  • (see Partners)