Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN)
Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN)

Topic
Public Attitudes towards Older Age
Uses of Technology
Wellbeing
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Office for National Statistics
Customer Contact Centre
Government Buildings, Cardiff Road
NP10 8XG Newport, South Wales
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1633 455678.
Email: socialsurveys(at)ons.gsi.gov.uk
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Timeliness, transparency

Data are available about 12 months after the end of fieldwork

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
With effect from 2008, the decision was made by ONS to make all new and existing Disability Monitoring data (Module 363) and Contraception data (Module 170) issuable only to Approved Researchers under Special Licence access conditions due to the disclosive nature of the modules. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
With effect from 2008, the decision was made by ONS to make all new and existing Disability Monitoring data (Module 363) and Contraception data (Module 170) issuable only to Approved Researchers under Special Licence access conditions due to the disclosive nature of the modules. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
With effect from 2008, the decision was made by ONS to make all new and existing Disability Monitoring data (Module 363) and Contraception data (Module 170) issuable only to Approved Researchers under Special Licence access conditions due to the disclosive nature of the modules. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey was previously known as the Opinions Survey and adopted its current name when it merged with the non-EU-SILC questions from the General Lifestyle Survey (GLF). The survey was also previously known as the ONS Omnibus Survey – changing its name to the Opinions Survey when it became part of the ONS Integrated Household Survey (IHS) in 2008. Opinions and Lifestyle left the IHS in 2010 to allow more space for client module questions. When first set up, the survey was only available to clients in other government departments. The very first Opinions and Lifestyle (Opinions) survey ran in October 1990, and included questions on the topics of mortgage arrears, contraception, step-families and the use of GP practices. A few years later, the survey was also offered to non-profit making bodies in the academic and voluntary sectors. The survey has an achieved sample size of about 1,100 interviews each month and the client’s module data is delivered just five weeks after the survey is run in the field. The survey has a maximum turnaround of 14 weeks from confirming clients questions to the delivery of module data sets. However, modules of questions are generally booked on the survey approximately six months to a year in advance. From January 2008 the ONS Omnibus Survey changed its name to the ONS Opinions Survey (OPN) and became part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). As a result, certain classificatory variables were altered to harmonise with the rest of the surveys that form the IHS. For further information, see detailed breakdown of the changes contained within the documentation for 2008 studies onwards. From April 2012 the ONS Opinions Survey changed its name to the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey following the merger of the non-EU-SILC questions from the General Lifestyle Survey. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1990


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All adults (aged 16 or over)


Representative of all adults, aged 16 or over, living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables.


The Opinions and Lifestyle survey is a monthly, face-to-face ONS survey, which has provided a fast, reliable and cost-effective service to government departments, charities and academics for the last 20 years. From one-off questions to regular modules lasting ten minutes or more, Opinions and Lifestyle asks questions on a variety of topics every month. The survey offers a fast, cost-effective and reliable way of obtaining information on a variety of topics too brief to warrant a survey of their own. Opinions and Lifestyle can be used for: • providing quick answers to questions of immediate policy interest • assessing public awareness of new policies, initiatives and publicity campaigns • testing and piloting new survey questions • to obtain samples of respondents for follow-up projects (subject to respondent’s consent) The range of topics covered by the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey is diverse. For example, in 2010-11 around 20 different subjects were covered. Examples were: • climate change (Department of Transport) • charitable giving (National Council for Voluntary Organisations) • wellbeing (Office for National Statistics) • disability monitoring (Department for Work and Pensions) • cancer awareness (University College of London) • public perceptions of tax (HM Revenue & Customs) • working conditions (Health and Safety Executive) • later life (Department for Work and Pensions) • internet access (Office for National Statistics) • tobacco consumption (HM Revenue & Customs) • health and safety (Health and Safety Executive) • attitudes to ageing (Department for Work and Pensions) Many of these topic areas were subsequently repeated and may also reappear in future Opinions and Lifestyle surveys.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some recent publications include: • Bridgewood, A., Fenn, C., Dust, K., et al. “Focus on cultural diversity: the arts in England: attendance, participation and attitudes.” Research report 34, Arts Council Of England (2003). • Dawe, F. & Rainford, L. “Contraception and sexual health, 2003.” Office for National Statistics, 2004. • Fenn, C., Bridgwood, A., Dust, K., et al. “Arts in England 2003: attendance, participation and attitudes.” Research Report 37, Arts Council of England (2004). • Lader, D. “Contraception and Sexual Health, 2006/07.” Office for National Statistics, 2007. • Lader, D. “Smoking-related behaviour and attitudes 2007.” Office for National Statistics, 2008. • Lader, D., & Steel, M. “Drinking: adults behaviour and knowledge in 2009.” Office for National Statistics, 2010. • O' Brien, M. “Public attitudes towards development: knowledge and attitudes concerning poverty in developing countries.” The Department for International Development, 2004.

Coverage


The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey was previously known as the Opinions Survey and adopted its current name when it merged with the non-EU-SILC questions from the General Lifestyle Survey (GLF). The survey was also previously known as the ONS Omnibus Survey – changing its name to the Opinions Survey when it became part of the ONS Integrated Household Survey (IHS) in 2008. Opinions and Lifestyle left the IHS in 2010 to allow more space for client module questions. When first set up, the survey was only available to clients in other government departments. The very first Opinions and Lifestyle (Opinions) survey ran in October 1990, and included questions on the topics of mortgage arrears, contraception, step-families and the use of GP practices. A few years later, the survey was also offered to non-profit making bodies in the academic and voluntary sectors. The survey has an achieved sample size of about 1,100 interviews each month and the client’s module data is delivered just five weeks after the survey is run in the field. The survey has a maximum turnaround of 14 weeks from confirming clients questions to the delivery of module data sets. However, modules of questions are generally booked on the survey approximately six months to a year in advance. From January 2008 the ONS Omnibus Survey changed its name to the ONS Opinions Survey (OPN) and became part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). As a result, certain classificatory variables were altered to harmonise with the rest of the surveys that form the IHS. For further information, see detailed breakdown of the changes contained within the documentation for 2008 studies onwards. From April 2012 the ONS Opinions Survey changed its name to the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey following the merger of the non-EU-SILC questions from the General Lifestyle Survey. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1990


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All adults (aged 16 or over)


Representative of all adults, aged 16 or over, living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables.


The Opinions and Lifestyle survey is a monthly, face-to-face ONS survey, which has provided a fast, reliable and cost-effective service to government departments, charities and academics for the last 20 years. From one-off questions to regular modules lasting ten minutes or more, Opinions and Lifestyle asks questions on a variety of topics every month. The survey offers a fast, cost-effective and reliable way of obtaining information on a variety of topics too brief to warrant a survey of their own. Opinions and Lifestyle can be used for: • providing quick answers to questions of immediate policy interest • assessing public awareness of new policies, initiatives and publicity campaigns • testing and piloting new survey questions • to obtain samples of respondents for follow-up projects (subject to respondent’s consent) The range of topics covered by the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey is diverse. For example, in 2010-11 around 20 different subjects were covered. Examples were: • climate change (Department of Transport) • charitable giving (National Council for Voluntary Organisations) • wellbeing (Office for National Statistics) • disability monitoring (Department for Work and Pensions) • cancer awareness (University College of London) • public perceptions of tax (HM Revenue & Customs) • working conditions (Health and Safety Executive) • later life (Department for Work and Pensions) • internet access (Office for National Statistics) • tobacco consumption (HM Revenue & Customs) • health and safety (Health and Safety Executive) • attitudes to ageing (Department for Work and Pensions) Many of these topic areas were subsequently repeated and may also reappear in future Opinions and Lifestyle surveys.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some recent publications include: • Bridgewood, A., Fenn, C., Dust, K., et al. “Focus on cultural diversity: the arts in England: attendance, participation and attitudes.” Research report 34, Arts Council Of England (2003). • Dawe, F. & Rainford, L. “Contraception and sexual health, 2003.” Office for National Statistics, 2004. • Fenn, C., Bridgwood, A., Dust, K., et al. “Arts in England 2003: attendance, participation and attitudes.” Research Report 37, Arts Council of England (2004). • Lader, D. “Contraception and Sexual Health, 2006/07.” Office for National Statistics, 2007. • Lader, D. “Smoking-related behaviour and attitudes 2007.” Office for National Statistics, 2008. • Lader, D., & Steel, M. “Drinking: adults behaviour and knowledge in 2009.” Office for National Statistics, 2010. • O' Brien, M. “Public attitudes towards development: knowledge and attitudes concerning poverty in developing countries.” The Department for International Development, 2004.

Coverage


The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey was previously known as the Opinions Survey and adopted its current name when it merged with the non-EU-SILC questions from the General Lifestyle Survey (GLF). The survey was also previously known as the ONS Omnibus Survey – changing its name to the Opinions Survey when it became part of the ONS Integrated Household Survey (IHS) in 2008. Opinions and Lifestyle left the IHS in 2010 to allow more space for client module questions. When first set up, the survey was only available to clients in other government departments. The very first Opinions and Lifestyle (Opinions) survey ran in October 1990, and included questions on the topics of mortgage arrears, contraception, step-families and the use of GP practices. A few years later, the survey was also offered to non-profit making bodies in the academic and voluntary sectors. The survey has an achieved sample size of about 1,100 interviews each month and the client’s module data is delivered just five weeks after the survey is run in the field. The survey has a maximum turnaround of 14 weeks from confirming clients questions to the delivery of module data sets. However, modules of questions are generally booked on the survey approximately six months to a year in advance. From January 2008 the ONS Omnibus Survey changed its name to the ONS Opinions Survey (OPN) and became part of the Integrated Household Survey (IHS). As a result, certain classificatory variables were altered to harmonise with the rest of the surveys that form the IHS. For further information, see detailed breakdown of the changes contained within the documentation for 2008 studies onwards. From April 2012 the ONS Opinions Survey changed its name to the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey following the merger of the non-EU-SILC questions from the General Lifestyle Survey. [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1990


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales, Scotland) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


All adults (aged 16 or over)


Representative of all adults, aged 16 or over, living in (private) households in Great Britain The data include weighting variables.


The Opinions and Lifestyle survey is a monthly, face-to-face ONS survey, which has provided a fast, reliable and cost-effective service to government departments, charities and academics for the last 20 years. From one-off questions to regular modules lasting ten minutes or more, Opinions and Lifestyle asks questions on a variety of topics every month. The survey offers a fast, cost-effective and reliable way of obtaining information on a variety of topics too brief to warrant a survey of their own. Opinions and Lifestyle can be used for: • providing quick answers to questions of immediate policy interest • assessing public awareness of new policies, initiatives and publicity campaigns • testing and piloting new survey questions • to obtain samples of respondents for follow-up projects (subject to respondent’s consent) The range of topics covered by the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey is diverse. For example, in 2010-11 around 20 different subjects were covered. Examples were: • climate change (Department of Transport) • charitable giving (National Council for Voluntary Organisations) • wellbeing (Office for National Statistics) • disability monitoring (Department for Work and Pensions) • cancer awareness (University College of London) • public perceptions of tax (HM Revenue & Customs) • working conditions (Health and Safety Executive) • later life (Department for Work and Pensions) • internet access (Office for National Statistics) • tobacco consumption (HM Revenue & Customs) • health and safety (Health and Safety Executive) • attitudes to ageing (Department for Work and Pensions) Many of these topic areas were subsequently repeated and may also reappear in future Opinions and Lifestyle surveys.


Further information on publications is available from the Office for National Statistics. Some recent publications include: • Bridgewood, A., Fenn, C., Dust, K., et al. “Focus on cultural diversity: the arts in England: attendance, participation and attitudes.” Research report 34, Arts Council Of England (2003). • Dawe, F. & Rainford, L. “Contraception and sexual health, 2003.” Office for National Statistics, 2004. • Fenn, C., Bridgwood, A., Dust, K., et al. “Arts in England 2003: attendance, participation and attitudes.” Research Report 37, Arts Council of England (2004). • Lader, D. “Contraception and Sexual Health, 2006/07.” Office for National Statistics, 2007. • Lader, D. “Smoking-related behaviour and attitudes 2007.” Office for National Statistics, 2008. • Lader, D., & Steel, M. “Drinking: adults behaviour and knowledge in 2009.” Office for National Statistics, 2010. • O' Brien, M. “Public attitudes towards development: knowledge and attitudes concerning poverty in developing countries.” The Department for International Development, 2004.


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not readily available.


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not readily available.


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not readily available.


Data are anonymised


Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Breaks are described in the section on Coverage.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


In January 2010, the OPN component was dropped from the IHS due to only one individual per household being interviewed, while the IHS requires questions to be asked of all household members. This process significantly increased the length of the OPN interview and, therefore, OPN reverted back to interviewing one household member, but still contains questions harmonised to the IHS. Opinions and Lifestyle has the advantage of offering clients a snapshot in time which is not diluted by long-term changes to social, political and environmental conditions.

Applicability


In January 2010, the OPN component was dropped from the IHS due to only one individual per household being interviewed, while the IHS requires questions to be asked of all household members. This process significantly increased the length of the OPN interview and, therefore, OPN reverted back to interviewing one household member, but still contains questions harmonised to the IHS. Opinions and Lifestyle has the advantage of offering clients a snapshot in time which is not diluted by long-term changes to social, political and environmental conditions.

Applicability


In January 2010, the OPN component was dropped from the IHS due to only one individual per household being interviewed, while the IHS requires questions to be asked of all household members. This process significantly increased the length of the OPN interview and, therefore, OPN reverted back to interviewing one household member, but still contains questions harmonised to the IHS. Opinions and Lifestyle has the advantage of offering clients a snapshot in time which is not diluted by long-term changes to social, political and environmental conditions.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Mike Murphy
  • (see Partners)