Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW)
Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW)

Topic
Uses of Technology
Social, Civic and Cultural Engagement
Relevance for this Topic
Country United Kingdom
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Office for National Statistics
Customer Contact Centre
Government Buildings, Cardiff Road
NP10 8XG Newport, South Wales
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0) 1633 455678.
Email: crimestatistics(at)ONS.gov.uk
Url: http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/

Timeliness, transparency

Data are available about 9 months after the end of fieldwork

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire

Type of data


Survey

Type of Study

Cross-section, regular

Data gathering method

Face-to-face interview (CAPI, PAPI)

Self-administered questionnaire


Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The self-completion modules contained within the CSEW (formerly BCS) contain sensitive data, and so are not available for End User Licence (standard access). Express permission has to be sought from the depositor before the files may be released to users. A Special Licence system has been introduced and the data are only available to ONS Approved Researchers. However, for 2007-2008 and earlier survey years, the previous conditional access system is still currently in place. Therefore, users should follow the instructions below depending on the year of data required. BCS 1982 to 2007/08: Users who require self-completion modules should order the data online. To order the data, registered users should use the relevant Download/order link(s), select a previously registered usage or register a new use of data, tick the box(es) in the 'Other media' column and proceed from there. Users should specify in the 'Notes' section which self-completion module(s) they require. Upon receipt of the order the UK Data Service will send the prospective user a form to complete. Users are advised to provide a reasonably detailed description of their intended use of the data. If further information is required, contact the UK Data Service. This applies to the following modules: • drugs data from the 1996, 1998, 2000-2008 surveys • domestic violence data from 1996 • stalking data from 1998 • drinking behaviour data from 2002-2008 • interpersonal violence (IPV) data from 2001-2008 domestic violence and sexual victimisation modules) • sexual victimisation/assault data from 2000, 2005--2007 • stolen goods data from 2002-2004, 2005-2008 It should be noted that the self-completion data are not allowed to be used for teaching purposes. The sexual victimisation self-completion modules from 1996 and 1998 are currently unavailable. BCS/CSEW 2008/09 onwards: For the 2008/09 onwards, data from the self-completion modules, a low-level geographic variables dataset and (from 2009/10) data from the children's self-completion module, have been held under separate study numbers to the main survey and are available only to Office for National Statistics (ONS) Approved Researchers, under Special Licence access conditions. The same applies to British Crime Survey, 2006-2007: Special Licence Access, Social Heterogeneity Variables. From April 2012, responsibility for the survey moved to the ONS, and the BCS became the CSEW. From 2011/12 onwards, the interpersonal violence module (IPV) (comprising data on domestic violence, sexual victimisation and stalking) became available only under Secure Access conditions. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English

Access to data


Data are available from the UK Data Service (previously the Economic and Social Data Service, ESDS): http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/ The website contains detailed information on conditions of access, and it is also possible to contact the UK Data Service by phone: +44 (0)1206 872143, or by email: help@ukdataservice.ac.uk

Conditions of access


Registration is required and standard UK Data Service conditions of use apply. The depositor may be informed about usage. All users are required to agree to the terms and conditions pertaining to the use of data. These are described in the End User Licence (EUL) and agreed to when registering with the UK Data Service. Researchers based at a UK institution of higher or further education (UK HE/FE) can access the UK Data Service through their library. If you are outside the UK you will need to apply for a UK Data Archive username and password, and then register with the UK Data Service. In general, data required for non-commercial purposes can be downloaded at no cost. If data are requested on portable media, e.g. CD, handling and postage and packing fees will apply. See: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../charges.aspx
The self-completion modules contained within the CSEW (formerly BCS) contain sensitive data, and so are not available for End User Licence (standard access). Express permission has to be sought from the depositor before the files may be released to users. A Special Licence system has been introduced and the data are only available to ONS Approved Researchers. However, for 2007-2008 and earlier survey years, the previous conditional access system is still currently in place. Therefore, users should follow the instructions below depending on the year of data required. BCS 1982 to 2007/08: Users who require self-completion modules should order the data online. To order the data, registered users should use the relevant Download/order link(s), select a previously registered usage or register a new use of data, tick the box(es) in the 'Other media' column and proceed from there. Users should specify in the 'Notes' section which self-completion module(s) they require. Upon receipt of the order the UK Data Service will send the prospective user a form to complete. Users are advised to provide a reasonably detailed description of their intended use of the data. If further information is required, contact the UK Data Service. This applies to the following modules: • drugs data from the 1996, 1998, 2000-2008 surveys • domestic violence data from 1996 • stalking data from 1998 • drinking behaviour data from 2002-2008 • interpersonal violence (IPV) data from 2001-2008 domestic violence and sexual victimisation modules) • sexual victimisation/assault data from 2000, 2005--2007 • stolen goods data from 2002-2004, 2005-2008 It should be noted that the self-completion data are not allowed to be used for teaching purposes. The sexual victimisation self-completion modules from 1996 and 1998 are currently unavailable. BCS/CSEW 2008/09 onwards: For the 2008/09 onwards, data from the self-completion modules, a low-level geographic variables dataset and (from 2009/10) data from the children's self-completion module, have been held under separate study numbers to the main survey and are available only to Office for National Statistics (ONS) Approved Researchers, under Special Licence access conditions. The same applies to British Crime Survey, 2006-2007: Special Licence Access, Social Heterogeneity Variables. From April 2012, responsibility for the survey moved to the ONS, and the BCS became the CSEW. From 2011/12 onwards, the interpersonal violence module (IPV) (comprising data on domestic violence, sexual victimisation and stalking) became available only under Secure Access conditions. For more information, see: ukdataservice.ac.uk/.../conditions.aspx


This depends upon the user and conditions of use.


Anonymised microdata


Survey data from the UK Data Service are usually available to download in SPSS, Stata and tab-delimited (suitable for use in MS Excel) formats.


English


Coverage


The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), previously known as the British Crime Survey (BCS), has been in existence since 1981. Up to 2001, the survey was conducted biennially. From April 2001, interviewing was carried out continually and reported on in financial year cycles and the crime reference period was altered to accommodate this change. The core sample size has increased from around 11,000 in the earlier cycles to over 40,000. Following the National Statistician's Review of Crime Statistics in June 2011 the collation and publication of Crime Statistics moved to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) from 1st April 2012, and the survey changed its name to the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) accordingly. Scottish data: The 1982 and 1988 BCS waves were also conducted in Scotland. The England and Wales data for 1982 and 1988 are held at the UK Data Archive, but the Scottish data for these studies are held separately. Since 1993, separate Scottish Crime and Justice Surveys have been conducted. Number of units sampled in 2011/2012: 46,031 adults and 3,930 children [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1981/1982


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


Adults aged 16 years and over, and children aged 10-15 years


Representative of adults aged 16 years and over, resident in (private) households in England and Wales, and children aged 10-15 years resident in the same households. The data include weighting variables.


The Crime Survey for England and Wales (formerly British Crime Survey) asks people aged 16 and over living in households in England and Wales about their experiences of crime in the last 12 months. These experiences are used to estimate levels of crime in England and Wales. Until recently the survey did not cover crimes against those aged under 16, but since January 2009 it has also interviewed children aged 10 to 15. The survey asks respondents to the survey about their attitudes to crime-related issues such as: • the police; • the criminal justice system; • their perceptions of crime and anti-social behaviour. The results of the survey play an important role in informing government policy. The survey traditionally asks a sole randomly selected adult in a random sample of households, details pertaining to any instances where they, or the household, have been a victim of a crime in the previous 12 months. These are recorded in the victim form data file (VF). A wide range of questions are then asked covering demographics and crime-related subjects such as attitudes to the police and the criminal justice system (CJS). Most of the questionnaire is completed in a face-to-face interview in the respondent's home; these variables are contained within the non-victim form (NVF) data file. Since 2009, the survey has been extended to children aged 10-15 years old; one resident of that age range has also been selected at random from the household and asked about incidents where they have been a victim of crime, and other related topics. The first set of children's data, covering January-December 2009, had experimental status, and is held separately in the Archive. From 2009-2010, the children's data cover the same period as the adult data and are included with the main dataset. A series of questions on drinking behaviour, drug use and intimate personal violence (including stalking and sexual victimisation) are administered to adults via a self-completion module which the respondent completes on a laptop computer. Children aged 10-15 years also complete a separate self-completion questionnaire. The questions are contained within the main questionnaire documents, but the data are available under Special Licence/Secure Access conditions from the UK Data Archive. Lower-level geographic variables are also available under Special Licence conditions to match to the survey. See individual survey years for further details.


A selection of previous technical reports and papers include: • Allen, D., & Payne, D. “Crime prevention in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey.” Scottish Office (1991). • Allen, D., & Payne, D. “The public and the police in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey.” Scottish Office (1991). • Budd, T. “Burglary: practice messages from the British Crime Survey, Briefing Note 5/01.” Home Office, London, 2001. • Budd, T., & Sims, L. “Antisocial behaviour and disorder: findings from the 2000 British Crime Survey.” Findings 145, Home Office (2001). • Hales, J., et al. “2000 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London, 2001. • Kinshott, G. “Vehicle related thefts: practice messages from the British Crime Survey, Briefing Note 6/01.” Home Office, London, 2001. • Mattinson, J. “Stranger and acquaintance violence: practice messages from the British Crime Survey.” Briefing Note 7/01, Home Office (2001). • National Opinion Polls. “1984 British Crime Survey: technical report.” NOP, London, 1985. • Payne, D. “Crime in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey.” Scottish Office (1992). • Social and Community Planning Research. “1988 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report.” SCPR, London, 1988. • Wood, D. “British crime survey: technical report.” SCPR, London, 1982.

Coverage


The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), previously known as the British Crime Survey (BCS), has been in existence since 1981. Up to 2001, the survey was conducted biennially. From April 2001, interviewing was carried out continually and reported on in financial year cycles and the crime reference period was altered to accommodate this change. The core sample size has increased from around 11,000 in the earlier cycles to over 40,000. Following the National Statistician's Review of Crime Statistics in June 2011 the collation and publication of Crime Statistics moved to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) from 1st April 2012, and the survey changed its name to the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) accordingly. Scottish data: The 1982 and 1988 BCS waves were also conducted in Scotland. The England and Wales data for 1982 and 1988 are held at the UK Data Archive, but the Scottish data for these studies are held separately. Since 1993, separate Scottish Crime and Justice Surveys have been conducted. Number of units sampled in 2011/2012: 46,031 adults and 3,930 children [Note: Older people are represented in this data source (approximately) according to their proportion in the population. In 2011, over one third of the total UK population (and approximately 40 per cent of the adult population 16+) was aged 50 and over.]


1981/1982


The data includes a variety of demographic variables, including age and sex. The sample is stratified.


Multi-stage stratified random sample


Countries (England, Wales) Government Office Regions (NUTS1)


Adults aged 16 years and over, and children aged 10-15 years


Representative of adults aged 16 years and over, resident in (private) households in England and Wales, and children aged 10-15 years resident in the same households. The data include weighting variables.


The Crime Survey for England and Wales (formerly British Crime Survey) asks people aged 16 and over living in households in England and Wales about their experiences of crime in the last 12 months. These experiences are used to estimate levels of crime in England and Wales. Until recently the survey did not cover crimes against those aged under 16, but since January 2009 it has also interviewed children aged 10 to 15. The survey asks respondents to the survey about their attitudes to crime-related issues such as: • the police; • the criminal justice system; • their perceptions of crime and anti-social behaviour. The results of the survey play an important role in informing government policy. The survey traditionally asks a sole randomly selected adult in a random sample of households, details pertaining to any instances where they, or the household, have been a victim of a crime in the previous 12 months. These are recorded in the victim form data file (VF). A wide range of questions are then asked covering demographics and crime-related subjects such as attitudes to the police and the criminal justice system (CJS). Most of the questionnaire is completed in a face-to-face interview in the respondent's home; these variables are contained within the non-victim form (NVF) data file. Since 2009, the survey has been extended to children aged 10-15 years old; one resident of that age range has also been selected at random from the household and asked about incidents where they have been a victim of crime, and other related topics. The first set of children's data, covering January-December 2009, had experimental status, and is held separately in the Archive. From 2009-2010, the children's data cover the same period as the adult data and are included with the main dataset. A series of questions on drinking behaviour, drug use and intimate personal violence (including stalking and sexual victimisation) are administered to adults via a self-completion module which the respondent completes on a laptop computer. Children aged 10-15 years also complete a separate self-completion questionnaire. The questions are contained within the main questionnaire documents, but the data are available under Special Licence/Secure Access conditions from the UK Data Archive. Lower-level geographic variables are also available under Special Licence conditions to match to the survey. See individual survey years for further details.


A selection of previous technical reports and papers include: • Allen, D., & Payne, D. “Crime prevention in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey.” Scottish Office (1991). • Allen, D., & Payne, D. “The public and the police in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey.” Scottish Office (1991). • Budd, T. “Burglary: practice messages from the British Crime Survey, Briefing Note 5/01.” Home Office, London, 2001. • Budd, T., & Sims, L. “Antisocial behaviour and disorder: findings from the 2000 British Crime Survey.” Findings 145, Home Office (2001). • Hales, J., et al. “2000 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report.” National Centre for Social Research, London, 2001. • Kinshott, G. “Vehicle related thefts: practice messages from the British Crime Survey, Briefing Note 6/01.” Home Office, London, 2001. • Mattinson, J. “Stranger and acquaintance violence: practice messages from the British Crime Survey.” Briefing Note 7/01, Home Office (2001). • National Opinion Polls. “1984 British Crime Survey: technical report.” NOP, London, 1985. • Payne, D. “Crime in Scotland - findings from the 1988 British Crime Survey.” Scottish Office (1992). • Social and Community Planning Research. “1988 British Crime Survey (England and Wales): technical report.” SCPR, London, 1988. • Wood, D. “British crime survey: technical report.” SCPR, London, 1982.


Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not readily available.


Data are anonymised

Linkage


There is an ongoing cross-governmental programme of work in the UK which aims to develop and improve standardised inputs and outputs for use in official statistics. This is known as harmonisation, and is led by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). While this work primarily affects government-run surveys, the results have an impact on most national UK data sources. Furthermore, harmonisation has important benefits for all researchers using these surveys, and not just government statisticians. For more information, see: www.ons.gov.uk/.../index.html
Further information is not readily available.


Data are anonymised


Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.

Data quality


In addition to unit non-response, the data include item non-response and may be subject to other errors that are typical of surveys and censuses. This data source is used to prepare official statistics, which are required to meet quality standards. These standards are monitored by the UK Statistics Authority, according to the statutory authority provided by the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
www.statisticsauthority.gov.uk/.../index.html
For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website


There are no major breaks for this data source.


In general, the consistency of this data source is good. For more information on data quality, see the survey documentation on the UK Data Service website.


Applicability


The survey provides a better reflection of the extent of household and personal crime than police recorded statistics because the survey includes crimes that are not reported to, or recorded by, the police. The survey is also a better indicator of long-term trends because it is unaffected by changes in levels of reporting to the police or police recording practices. However, the survey does not aim to provide an absolute count of crime and has notable exceptions, including homicides and incidents against those living in communal establishments or people who are homeless. The main survey count of crime also does not include fraud, sexual offences or drug use. However, these are covered in additional modules within the survey and are reported on separately. The study includes information from the adult and child questionnaires. Adults: • The adult non-victim form questionnaire covered: perceptions of crime and local area; performance of the CJS; mobile phone and bicycle crime; experiences of the police (Module A); attitudes to the CJS (Module B); crime prevention and security (Module C); ad-hoc crime topics (Module D); plastic card fraud; mass-marketing fraud; anti-social behaviour; demographics and media. • The adult victim form contains offence-level data. Up to six different incidents were asked about for each respondent. Each of these constituted a separate victim form and can be matched back to the respondent-level data. Topics covered included: the nature and circumstances of the incident; details of offenders; security measures; costs; emotional reactions; contact with the CJS; and outcomes where known. • Self-completion modules for adult respondents covered drug use, drinking behaviour, and interpersonal violence (IPV) (domestic violence, sexual victimisation and stalking). The data are subject to Special Licence/Secure Access conditions. Children: • The child questionnaire included: schooling and perceptions of crime; crime screener questions – personal incidents only; victimisation module; perceptions of and attitudes towards the police; anti-social behaviour; and crime prevention and security. • The child self-completion questionnaire covered: use of the internet; bullying; street gangs; school truancy; personal security; drinking behaviour and cannabis use. Data from the child self-completion questions are also available only under Special Licence access.

Applicability


The survey provides a better reflection of the extent of household and personal crime than police recorded statistics because the survey includes crimes that are not reported to, or recorded by, the police. The survey is also a better indicator of long-term trends because it is unaffected by changes in levels of reporting to the police or police recording practices. However, the survey does not aim to provide an absolute count of crime and has notable exceptions, including homicides and incidents against those living in communal establishments or people who are homeless. The main survey count of crime also does not include fraud, sexual offences or drug use. However, these are covered in additional modules within the survey and are reported on separately. The study includes information from the adult and child questionnaires. Adults: • The adult non-victim form questionnaire covered: perceptions of crime and local area; performance of the CJS; mobile phone and bicycle crime; experiences of the police (Module A); attitudes to the CJS (Module B); crime prevention and security (Module C); ad-hoc crime topics (Module D); plastic card fraud; mass-marketing fraud; anti-social behaviour; demographics and media. • The adult victim form contains offence-level data. Up to six different incidents were asked about for each respondent. Each of these constituted a separate victim form and can be matched back to the respondent-level data. Topics covered included: the nature and circumstances of the incident; details of offenders; security measures; costs; emotional reactions; contact with the CJS; and outcomes where known. • Self-completion modules for adult respondents covered drug use, drinking behaviour, and interpersonal violence (IPV) (domestic violence, sexual victimisation and stalking). The data are subject to Special Licence/Secure Access conditions. Children: • The child questionnaire included: schooling and perceptions of crime; crime screener questions – personal incidents only; victimisation module; perceptions of and attitudes towards the police; anti-social behaviour; and crime prevention and security. • The child self-completion questionnaire covered: use of the internet; bullying; street gangs; school truancy; personal security; drinking behaviour and cannabis use. Data from the child self-completion questions are also available only under Special Licence access.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Mike Murphy
  • (see Partners)