Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH)
Riksrepresentativ longitudinell arbetsmiljöundersökning

Topic
Health and Performance
Work and Productivity
Social Systems and Welfare
Relevance for this Topic
Country Sweden
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Hugo Westerlund
Stress Research Institute
Frescati Hagväg. 16A
106 91 Stockholm
Sweden
Phone: +46-8-159 868
Email: hugo.westerlund(at)stress.su.se
Url: www.stressforskning.su.se/.../slosh-start

Timeliness, transparency

The initial data is typically available in the technical reports provided by Statistics Sweden within a couple of months after the finalised data collection.

Type of data


Registry + Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Registries

Self-administered questionnaire

Type of data


Registry + Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Registries

Self-administered questionnaire

Type of data


Registry + Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Data gathering method

Registries

Self-administered questionnaire


Access to data


Data is available for the scientific community in line with Swedish laws and agreements with Statistics Sweden.

Conditions of access


No fee agreement with the external researcher


As soon as possible, normally within a three months’ time span


Anonymised microdata.


Normally SAS, STATA, SPSS, but other formats could be provided if necessary


Data are available in English and Swedish.

Access to data


Data is available for the scientific community in line with Swedish laws and agreements with Statistics Sweden.

Conditions of access


No fee agreement with the external researcher


As soon as possible, normally within a three months’ time span


Anonymised microdata.


Normally SAS, STATA, SPSS, but other formats could be provided if necessary


Data are available in English and Swedish.

Access to data


Data is available for the scientific community in line with Swedish laws and agreements with Statistics Sweden.

Conditions of access


No fee agreement with the external researcher


As soon as possible, normally within a three months’ time span


Anonymised microdata.


Normally SAS, STATA, SPSS, but other formats could be provided if necessary


Data are available in English and Swedish.


Coverage


Wave 1: Data was collected in 2006 and included a sample of 9,214 individuals. Wave 2: Data was collected in 2008 and included a sample of 18,915 individuals. Wave 3: Data was collected in 2010 and included a sample of 17,738 individuals. Wave 4: Data was collected in 2012 and included a sample of 17,409 individuals. The main representative cohort is comprised of 18,915 individuals. In 2010, a boost sample from those living in the greater Stockholm or Gothenburg area was added. Thus, the overall SLOSH contains information on 21,489 respondents.


Data was first collected in 2006. The baseline data from the Swedish Work Environment surveys are available for 2003 and 2005. Register data is available retrospectively in some cases back until 1967.


The SLOSH sample consists of all respondents to the Swedish Work Environment Surveys (SWES) 2003 (n=9,212) and 2005 (n=9,703), forming the main representative cohort of 18,915 individuals, plus those participants from the 2007 SWES living in Stockholm or Gothenburg areas (n=2,572). SWES is conducted biennially by Statistics Sweden (SCB) and consists of subsamples of gainfully employed people, aged 16-64 years, from the Labor Force Survey (LSF). These individuals were first sampled into the LFS through stratification by country of birth, sex, citizenship, and occupation.


See above


Sweden. At present county level is the smallest geographical area for analyses.


19-74 (due to the fact that first basic sample from 16 – 64 has been older during the longitudinal process)


The primary focus of SLOSH is on a wide range of prospective longitudinal research questions about the relationships between labour market participation, working life, social environment, personal agency, and health. Further, the purpose of the database is to better understand the aetiology of illnesses and functional limitations of public health relevance, and to increase the understanding of ‘the causes behind the causes’. This includes studying socioeconomic factors, occupational exposures, and health behaviours, as well as factors in private life. SLOSH respondents choose from two questionnaire versions, one for those currently in work, and one for those who are not in gainful employment. The former contains questions about work, health, social factors outside work, and health behaviours. The non-worker version replaces the work section with questions about the re-spondents’ current life situation (retired, unemployed, studying etc.), e.g. the reasons for not working, positive and negative aspects of not working, and, where applicable, how rehabilitation is experienced.


• Canlon B., Theorell T., Hasson D. "Associations between stress and hearing problems in humans". Hear Res 2013; 295: 9-15. • Fransson, EI, Nyberg, ST, Heikkilä, K, et al. "Comparison of alternative versions of the job demand-control scales in 17 European cohort studies: the IPD-Work consortium". BMC Public Health, 2012;12(1):62 • H (2009) "Restructuring and Employee Health. In: Grassbauer M, Sakalauskas L, Zavadskas E.K (Eds.). 5th international Vilnius Conference, Knowledge-Based Technologies and OR Methodologies for Strategic Decisions of Substainable Development", pp. 331-336 – P2758 • Hasson D, Theorell T, Benka Wallén M, et al. "Stress and prevalence of hearing problems in the Swedish working population". BMC Public Health 2011, 11:130 (Epub ahead of print 2011 Feb 23) DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-130. • Hasson D, Theorell T, Bergquist J, Canlon B. "Acute Stress Induces Hyperacusis in Women with High Levels of Emotional Exhaustion". PloS one 2013; 8: e52945. • Hasson D, Theorell T, Westerlund H, Canlon B. "Prevalence and characteristics of hearing problems in a working and non-working Swedish population". J Epidemiol Community Health 2010, 64(5):453-460. Epub 2009 Aug 19. • Hebert S, Canlon B, Hasson D, Magnusson Hanson LL, Westerlund H, et al. "Tinnitus severity is reduced with reduction of depressive mood--a prospective population study in Sweden". PloS one 2012; 7: e37733. • Hebert S, Canlon B, Hasson D. "Emotional exhaustion as a predictor of tinnitus". Psychother Psychosom 2012; 81: 324-326. • Heikkilä, K, Nyberg, ST, Fransson, EI, et al. "Job strain and tobacco smoking: An individual-participant data meta-analysis of 166,130 adults in 15 European studies". PLoS ONE, One. 2012;7(7):e35463. • Heikkilä K, Nyberg ST, Fransson EI, et al. "Job strain and alcohol intake: A collaborative meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 140,000 men and women". PLoS ONE, 2012;7(7):e40101. • Kinsten A, Magnusson Hanson L, Hyde M, et al. "Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH): a nationally representative psychosocial survey of the Swedish working population". Stockholm: Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, 2007. • Leineweber C, Baltzer M, Magnusson Hanson LL, & Westerlund H. Work-family conflict and health in Swedish working women and men: A 2-year prospective analysis (the SLOSH study). European Journal of Public Health, Epub ahead of print 2012 Jun 8. • Leineweber C, Wege N, Westerlund H, Theorell T, Wahrendorf M, Siegrist J. "How valid is a short measure of effort-reward imbalance at work? A replication study from Sweden". Occup Environ Med 2010; 67 (8):526-531. Epub 2010 Jun 23, DOI: 10.1136/oem.2009. • Leineweber C, Westerlund H, Hagberg J, Svedberg P, Alexanderson K. "Sickness presenteeism is more than an alternative to sickness absence: Results from the population-based SLOSH study". International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2012; 85(8):905-914. DOI: 10.1007/s00420-012-0735-y • Magnusson Hanson LL, Åkerstedt T, Näswall K, et al. "Cross-lagged relationships between workplace demands, control, support and sleep problems". Sleep, 2011;34(10):1403-1410. • Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T, Bech P, Rugulies R, Burr H. Hyde M, Oxenstierna G, Westerlund H. Psychosocial working conditions and depressive symptoms among Swedish employees. International Archives of Occcupational and Environmental Health, 2009; 82(8):951-960. Epub 2009 Feb 24, DOI: 10.1007/s00420-009-0406-9. • Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T, Oxenstierna G, Hyde M, Westerlund H. "Demand, control, and social climate as predictors of emotional exhaustion symptoms in working Swedish men and women". Scand J Public Health, 2008; 36(7):737-743. • Miyakava M, Magnusson Hanson L, Theorell T, Westerlund H. "Subjective social status and health measures and its predictors in Swedish men and women (the SLOSH study)". Eur J Public Health. 2012;22(4):593-7. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckr064 • Nyberg A, Westerlund H, Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T. "Managerial leadership is associated with self-reported sickness absence and sickness presenteeism among Swedish men and women". Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 2008; 36:803-311. • Nyberg ST, Heikkilä K, Fransson EI, et al. "Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160,000 adults from 13 cohort studies". Journal of Internal Medicine. 2012; 272(1):65-73. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02482.x. Epub 2011 Dec 5. • Odéen M, Westerlund H, Theorell T, et al. "Expectancies, socioeconomic status, and self-rated health: Use of the simplified TOMCATS questionnaire". International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Epub ahead of print 2012 Feb 1. • Taloyan M, Aronsson G, Leineweber C, et al. "Sickness Presenteeism Predicts Suboptimal Self-Rated Health and Sickness Absence: A Nationally Representative Study of the Swedish Working Population". PLoS ONE 2012;7(9): e44721. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044721 • Theorell T, Nyberg A, Leineweber C, et al. "Non-listening and self centered leadership – relationships to socioeconomic conditions and employee mental health". PLoS ONE, 2012;7(9):e44119. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044119. Epub 2012 Sep 24 • Theorell T, Osika W, Leineweber C, et al. "Is cultural activity at work related to mental health in employees?" International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Epub ahead of print 2012 Mar 29. • Wallen MB, Hasson D, Theorell T, Canlon B, Osika W. "Possibilities and limitations of the polar RS800 in measuring heart rate variability at rest". Eur J Appl Physio 2011; 112(3):1153-65. doi: 10.1007/s00421-011-2079-9. • Wallen MB, Hasson D, Theorell T, Canlon B. "The correlation between the hyperacusis questionnaire and uncomfortable loudness levels is dependent on emotional exhaustion". Int J Audiol 2012;51: 722-729.

Coverage


Wave 1: Data was collected in 2006 and included a sample of 9,214 individuals. Wave 2: Data was collected in 2008 and included a sample of 18,915 individuals. Wave 3: Data was collected in 2010 and included a sample of 17,738 individuals. Wave 4: Data was collected in 2012 and included a sample of 17,409 individuals. The main representative cohort is comprised of 18,915 individuals. In 2010, a boost sample from those living in the greater Stockholm or Gothenburg area was added. Thus, the overall SLOSH contains information on 21,489 respondents.


Data was first collected in 2006. The baseline data from the Swedish Work Environment surveys are available for 2003 and 2005. Register data is available retrospectively in some cases back until 1967.


The SLOSH sample consists of all respondents of the Swedish Work Environment Surveys (SWES) in 2003 (n=9,212) and in 2005 (n=9,703), forming the main representative cohort of 18,915 individuals, plus those participants from the 2007 SWES living in Stockholm or Gothenburg areas (n=2,572). SWES is conducted biennially by Statistics Sweden (SCB) and consists of subsamples of gainfully employed people, aged 16-64 years, from the Labour Force Survey (LSF). These individuals were first sampled into the LFS through stratification by country of birth, sex, citizenship, and occupation.


See above


Sweden. At present county level is the smallest geographical area for analyses.


19-74 (due to the fact that first basic sample from 16 – 64 has been older during the longitudinal process)


The primary focus of SLOSH is on a wide range of prospective longitudinal research questions about the relationships between labour market participation, working life, social environment, personal agency, and health. Further, the purpose of the database is to better understand the aetiology of illnesses and functional limitations of public health relevance, and to increase the understanding of ‘the causes behind the causes’. This includes studying socioeconomic factors, occupational exposures, and health behaviours, as well as factors in private life. SLOSH respondents choose from two questionnaire versions, one for those currently working, and one for those who are not in gainful employment. The former contains questions about work, health, social factors outside work, and health behaviours. The non-worker version replaces the work section with questions about the re¬spondents’ current life situation (retired, unemployed, studying etc.), e.g. the reasons for not working, positive and negative aspects of not working, and, where applicable, how rehabilitation is experienced.


• Canlon B., Theorell T., Hasson D. "Associations between stress and hearing problems in humans". Hear Res 2013; 295: 9-15. • Fransson, EI, Nyberg, ST, Heikkilä, K, et al. "Comparison of alternative versions of the job demand-control scales in 17 European cohort studies: the IPD-Work consortium". BMC Public Health, 2012;12(1):62 • H (2009) "Restructuring and Employee Health. In: Grassbauer M, Sakalauskas L, Zavadskas E.K (Eds.). 5th international Vilnius Conference, Knowledge-Based Technologies and OR Methodologies for Strategic Decisions of Substainable Development", pp. 331-336 – P2758 • Hasson D, Theorell T, Benka Wallén M, et al. "Stress and prevalence of hearing problems in the Swedish working population". BMC Public Health 2011, 11:130 (Epub ahead of print 2011 Feb 23) DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-130. • Hasson D, Theorell T, Bergquist J, Canlon B. "Acute Stress Induces Hyperacusis in Women with High Levels of Emotional Exhaustion". PloS one 2013; 8: e52945. • Hasson D, Theorell T, Westerlund H, Canlon B. "Prevalence and characteristics of hearing problems in a working and non-working Swedish population". J Epidemiol Community Health 2010, 64(5):453-460. Epub 2009 Aug 19. • Hebert S, Canlon B, Hasson D, Magnusson Hanson LL, Westerlund H, et al. "Tinnitus severity is reduced with reduction of depressive mood--a prospective population study in Sweden". PloS one 2012; 7: e37733. • Hebert S, Canlon B, Hasson D. "Emotional exhaustion as a predictor of tinnitus". Psychother Psychosom 2012; 81: 324-326. • Heikkilä, K, Nyberg, ST, Fransson, EI, et al. "Job strain and tobacco smoking: An individual-participant data meta-analysis of 166,130 adults in 15 European studies". PLoS ONE, One. 2012;7(7):e35463. • Heikkilä K, Nyberg ST, Fransson EI, et al. "Job strain and alcohol intake: A collaborative meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 140,000 men and women". PLoS ONE, 2012;7(7):e40101. • Kinsten A, Magnusson Hanson L, Hyde M, et al. "Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH): a nationally representative psychosocial survey of the Swedish working population". Stockholm: Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, 2007. • Leineweber C, Baltzer M, Magnusson Hanson LL, & Westerlund H. Work-family conflict and health in Swedish working women and men: A 2-year prospective analysis (the SLOSH study). European Journal of Public Health, Epub ahead of print 2012 Jun 8. • Leineweber C, Wege N, Westerlund H, Theorell T, Wahrendorf M, Siegrist J. "How valid is a short measure of effort-reward imbalance at work? A replication study from Sweden". Occup Environ Med 2010; 67 (8):526-531. Epub 2010 Jun 23, DOI: 10.1136/oem.2009. • Leineweber C, Westerlund H, Hagberg J, Svedberg P, Alexanderson K. "Sickness presenteeism is more than an alternative to sickness absence: Results from the population-based SLOSH study". International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2012; 85(8):905-914. DOI: 10.1007/s00420-012-0735-y • Magnusson Hanson LL, Åkerstedt T, Näswall K, et al. "Cross-lagged relationships between workplace demands, control, support and sleep problems". Sleep, 2011;34(10):1403-1410. • Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T, Bech P, Rugulies R, Burr H. Hyde M, Oxenstierna G, Westerlund H. Psychosocial working conditions and depressive symptoms among Swedish employees. International Archives of Occcupational and Environmental Health, 2009; 82(8):951-960. Epub 2009 Feb 24, DOI: 10.1007/s00420-009-0406-9. • Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T, Oxenstierna G, Hyde M, Westerlund H. "Demand, control, and social climate as predictors of emotional exhaustion symptoms in working Swedish men and women". Scand J Public Health, 2008; 36(7):737-743. • Miyakava M, Magnusson Hanson L, Theorell T, Westerlund H. "Subjective social status and health measures and its predictors in Swedish men and women (the SLOSH study)". Eur J Public Health. 2012;22(4):593-7. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckr064 • Nyberg A, Westerlund H, Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T. "Managerial leadership is associated with self-reported sickness absence and sickness presenteeism among Swedish men and women". Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 2008; 36:803-311. • Nyberg ST, Heikkilä K, Fransson EI, et al. "Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160,000 adults from 13 cohort studies". Journal of Internal Medicine. 2012; 272(1):65-73. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02482.x. Epub 2011 Dec 5. • Odéen M, Westerlund H, Theorell T, et al. "Expectancies, socioeconomic status, and self-rated health: Use of the simplified TOMCATS questionnaire". International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Epub ahead of print 2012 Feb 1. • Taloyan M, Aronsson G, Leineweber C, et al. "Sickness Presenteeism Predicts Suboptimal Self-Rated Health and Sickness Absence: A Nationally Representative Study of the Swedish Working Population". PLoS ONE 2012;7(9): e44721. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044721 • Theorell T, Nyberg A, Leineweber C, et al. "Non-listening and self centered leadership – relationships to socioeconomic conditions and employee mental health". PLoS ONE, 2012;7(9):e44119. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044119. Epub 2012 Sep 24 • Theorell T, Osika W, Leineweber C, et al. "Is cultural activity at work related to mental health in employees?" International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Epub ahead of print 2012 Mar 29. • Wallen MB, Hasson D, Theorell T, Canlon B, Osika W. "Possibilities and limitations of the polar RS800 in measuring heart rate variability at rest". Eur J Appl Physio 2011; 112(3):1153-65. doi: 10.1007/s00421-011-2079-9. • Wallen MB, Hasson D, Theorell T, Canlon B. "The correlation between the hyperacusis questionnaire and uncomfortable loudness levels is dependent on emotional exhaustion". Int J Audiol 2012;51: 722-729.

Coverage


Wave 1: Data was collected in 2006 and included a sample of 9,214 individuals. Wave 2: Data was collected in 2008 and included a sample of 18,915 individuals. Wave 3: Data was collected in 2010 and included a sample of 17,738 individuals. Wave 4: Data was collected in 2012 and included a sample of 17,409 individuals. The main representative cohort is comprised of 18,915 individuals. In 2010, a boost sample from those living in the greater Stockholm or Gothenburg area was added. Thus, the overall SLOSH contains information on 21,489 respondents.


Data was first collected in 2006. The baseline data from the Swedish Work Environment surveys are available for 2003 and 2005. Register data is available retrospectively in some cases back until 1967.


The SLOSH sample consists of all respondents to the Swedish Work Environment Surveys (SWES) 2003 (n=9,212) and 2005 (n=9,703), forming the main representative cohort of 18,915 individuals, plus those participants from the 2007 SWES living in Stockholm or Gothenburg areas (n=2,572). SWES is conducted biennially by Statistics Sweden (SCB) and consists of subsamples of gainfully employed people, aged 16-64 years, from the Labor Force Survey (LSF). These individuals were first sampled into the LFS through stratification by country of birth, sex, citizenship, and occupation.


See above


Sweden. At present county level is the smallest geographical area for analyses.


19-74 (due to the fact that first basic sample from 16 – 64 has been older during the longitudinal process)


The primary focus of SLOSH is on a wide range of prospective longitudinal research questions about the relationships between labour market participation, working life, social environment, personal agency, and health. Further, the purpose of the database is to better understand the aetiology of illnesses and functional limitations of public health relevance, and to increase the understanding of ‘the causes behind the causes’. This includes studying socioeconomic factors, occupational exposures, and health behaviours, as well as factors in private life. SLOSH respondents choose from two questionnaire versions, one for those currently in work, and one for those who are not in gainful employment. The former contains questions about work, health, social factors outside work, and health behaviours. The non-worker version replaces the work section with questions about the respondents’ current life situation (retired, unemployed, studying etc.), e.g. the reasons for not working, positive and negative aspects of not working, and, where applicable, how rehabilitation is experienced.


• Canlon B., Theorell T., Hasson D. "Associations between stress and hearing problems in humans". Hear Res 2013; 295: 9-15. • Fransson, EI, Nyberg, ST, Heikkilä, K, et al. "Comparison of alternative versions of the job demand-control scales in 17 European cohort studies: the IPD-Work consortium". BMC Public Health, 2012;12(1):62 • H (2009) "Restructuring and Employee Health. In: Grassbauer M, Sakalauskas L, Zavadskas E.K (Eds.). 5th international Vilnius Conference, Knowledge-Based Technologies and OR Methodologies for Strategic Decisions of Substainable Development", pp. 331-336 – P2758 • Hasson D, Theorell T, Benka Wallén M, et al. "Stress and prevalence of hearing problems in the Swedish working population". BMC Public Health 2011, 11:130 (Epub ahead of print 2011 Feb 23) DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-130. • Hasson D, Theorell T, Bergquist J, Canlon B. "Acute Stress Induces Hyperacusis in Women with High Levels of Emotional Exhaustion". PloS one 2013; 8: e52945. • Hasson D, Theorell T, Westerlund H, Canlon B. "Prevalence and characteristics of hearing problems in a working and non-working Swedish population". J Epidemiol Community Health 2010, 64(5):453-460. Epub 2009 Aug 19. • Hebert S, Canlon B, Hasson D, Magnusson Hanson LL, Westerlund H, et al. "Tinnitus severity is reduced with reduction of depressive mood--a prospective population study in Sweden". PloS one 2012; 7: e37733. • Hebert S, Canlon B, Hasson D. "Emotional exhaustion as a predictor of tinnitus". Psychother Psychosom 2012; 81: 324-326. • Heikkilä, K, Nyberg, ST, Fransson, EI, et al. "Job strain and tobacco smoking: An individual-participant data meta-analysis of 166,130 adults in 15 European studies". PLoS ONE, One. 2012;7(7):e35463. • Heikkilä K, Nyberg ST, Fransson EI, et al. "Job strain and alcohol intake: A collaborative meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 140,000 men and women". PLoS ONE, 2012;7(7):e40101. • Kinsten A, Magnusson Hanson L, Hyde M, et al. "Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH): a nationally representative psychosocial survey of the Swedish working population". Stockholm: Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, 2007. • Leineweber C, Baltzer M, Magnusson Hanson LL, & Westerlund H. Work-family conflict and health in Swedish working women and men: A 2-year prospective analysis (the SLOSH study). European Journal of Public Health, Epub ahead of print 2012 Jun 8. • Leineweber C, Wege N, Westerlund H, Theorell T, Wahrendorf M, Siegrist J. "How valid is a short measure of effort-reward imbalance at work? A replication study from Sweden". Occup Environ Med 2010; 67 (8):526-531. Epub 2010 Jun 23, DOI: 10.1136/oem.2009. • Leineweber C, Westerlund H, Hagberg J, Svedberg P, Alexanderson K. "Sickness presenteeism is more than an alternative to sickness absence: Results from the population-based SLOSH study". International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2012; 85(8):905-914. DOI: 10.1007/s00420-012-0735-y • Magnusson Hanson LL, Åkerstedt T, Näswall K, et al. "Cross-lagged relationships between workplace demands, control, support and sleep problems". Sleep, 2011;34(10):1403-1410. • Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T, Bech P, Rugulies R, Burr H. Hyde M, Oxenstierna G, Westerlund H. Psychosocial working conditions and depressive symptoms among Swedish employees. International Archives of Occcupational and Environmental Health, 2009; 82(8):951-960. Epub 2009 Feb 24, DOI: 10.1007/s00420-009-0406-9. • Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T, Oxenstierna G, Hyde M, Westerlund H. "Demand, control, and social climate as predictors of emotional exhaustion symptoms in working Swedish men and women". Scand J Public Health, 2008; 36(7):737-743. • Miyakava M, Magnusson Hanson L, Theorell T, Westerlund H. "Subjective social status and health measures and its predictors in Swedish men and women (the SLOSH study)". Eur J Public Health. 2012;22(4):593-7. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckr064 • Nyberg A, Westerlund H, Magnusson Hanson LL, Theorell T. "Managerial leadership is associated with self-reported sickness absence and sickness presenteeism among Swedish men and women". Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 2008; 36:803-311. • Nyberg ST, Heikkilä K, Fransson EI, et al. "Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160,000 adults from 13 cohort studies". Journal of Internal Medicine. 2012; 272(1):65-73. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02482.x. Epub 2011 Dec 5. • Odéen M, Westerlund H, Theorell T, et al. "Expectancies, socioeconomic status, and self-rated health: Use of the simplified TOMCATS questionnaire". International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Epub ahead of print 2012 Feb 1. • Taloyan M, Aronsson G, Leineweber C, et al. "Sickness Presenteeism Predicts Suboptimal Self-Rated Health and Sickness Absence: A Nationally Representative Study of the Swedish Working Population". PLoS ONE 2012;7(9): e44721. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044721 • Theorell T, Nyberg A, Leineweber C, et al. "Non-listening and self centered leadership – relationships to socioeconomic conditions and employee mental health". PLoS ONE, 2012;7(9):e44119. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044119. Epub 2012 Sep 24 • Theorell T, Osika W, Leineweber C, et al. "Is cultural activity at work related to mental health in employees?" International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Epub ahead of print 2012 Mar 29. • Wallen MB, Hasson D, Theorell T, Canlon B, Osika W. "Possibilities and limitations of the polar RS800 in measuring heart rate variability at rest". Eur J Appl Physio 2011; 112(3):1153-65. doi: 10.1007/s00421-011-2079-9. • Wallen MB, Hasson D, Theorell T, Canlon B. "The correlation between the hyperacusis questionnaire and uncomfortable loudness levels is dependent on emotional exhaustion". Int J Audiol 2012;51: 722-729.


Linkage


SLOSH uses several well-established international validated scales. Moreover ISCO and SEI are available.


Register data regarding demographic information, income from work and old-age pension, receipt of disability pension, unemployment and social benefits, main workplace (including information about staffing and finances), hospitalisation, sickness absence, purchases of prescribed drugs, cancer and CVD cases, and deaths, are linked both prospectively and retrospectively to all respondents. All data are retrieved using personal identification numbers thorough a key file stored at SCB and delivered and stored with personal identification numbers replaced by serial ID numbers. The key is stored only by Statistics Sweden, ensuring that the researchers cannot connect the data to specific persons without their explicit permission.

Linkage


SLOSH uses several well-established international validated scales. Moreover ISCO and SEI are available.


Register data regarding demographic information, income from work and old-age pension, receipt of disability pension, unemployment and social benefits, main workplace (including. information about staffing and finances), hospitalisation, sickness absence, purchases of prescribed drugs, cancer and CVD cases, and deaths, are linked both prospectively and retrospectively to all respondents. All data are retrieved using personal identification numbers thorough a key file stored at SCB and delivered and stored with personal identification numbers replaced by serial ID numbers. The key is stored only by Statistics Sweden, ensuring that the researchers cannot connect the data to specific persons without their explicit permission.

Linkage


SLOSH uses several well-established international validated scales. Moreover ISCO and SEI are available.


Register data regarding demographic information, income from work and old-age pension, receipt of disability pension, unemployment and social benefits, main workplace (incl. information about staffing and finances), hospitalisation, sickness absence, purchases of prescribed drugs, cancer and CVD cases, and deaths, are linked both prospectively and retrospectively to all respondents. All data are retrieved using personal identification numbers thorough a key file stored at SCB and delivered and stored with personal identification numbers replaced by serial ID numbers. The key is stored only by Statistics Sweden, ensuring that the researchers cannot connect the data to specific persons without their explicit permission.


Data quality


Internal attrition differs considerably between the two versions of the questionnaire, i.e. those in gainful employment and those who are not, but also between items. For many items, internal attrition is between zero and 5 per cent, but for several items, it is as high as nearly 70%. This seems, however, not based on applicability of those questions, thus participants didn’t answer and a no-alternative was not available. The questionnaires are scanned by SCB and consistency is checked ensuring good quality of the data. Register data are of high quality.


SLOSH was initiated by the Stress Research Institute in 2006. Prof. Hugo Westerlund took over as PI for SLOSH from Prof. emeritus Töres Theorell on 1 January 2012 after having been co-PI since the inception of the study. SLOSH is run by a steering committee, which consists of among others Hugo Westerlund as PI and chairman, Ass. Prof. Constanze Leineweber (data manager), Dr. Linda L. Magnusson Hanson (SLOSH study director), and Dr. Martin Hyde (deputy head of unit). All these researchers have been involved in SLOSH since 2007 or earlier. Depending on different collaborations, research question, etc., some scales were omitted, other were added and others were changed during the years. However, there are no dramatic changes regarding the content of the questionnaires. Overall, there is a fairly stable core set of items that cover the main research topics (outlined above), which are repeated in each of the waves.


The complexity of the database results in some inconsistencies, including different formats for the same data from different years, different original variable names, as well as different coding systems across years (e.g. for education and diagnoses). However, we are continuously working to build up a library of SAS scripts which merge original data and transform them into a standard form with standardised names according to our uniform naming convention. All variables are given short names which are evocative of their meaning in English (e.g. ‘workfast’ for an item asking ‘Do you have to work very fast?’) followed by an underscore and the number of the wave (thus ‘workfast_3’ denotes the responses to this item in the 2010 SLOSH survey). In addition to being convenient, this convention facilitates the transformation of data between ‘wide’ and ‘long’ formats.

Data quality


Internal attrition differs considerably between the two versions of the questionnaire, i.e. those in gainful employment and those who are not, but also between items. For many items, internal attrition is between zero and 5 per cent, but for several items it is as high as nearly 70%. This seems, however, to be based on questions not being applicable to respondents, thus participants didn’t answer and no alternatives were available. The questionnaires are scanned by SCB and consistency is checked ensuring good quality of the data. Register data are of high quality.


SLOSH was initiated by the Stress Research Institute in 2006. Prof. Hugo Westerlund took over as PI for SLOSH from Prof. emeritus Töres Theorell on 1 January 2012 after having been co-PI since the inception of the study. SLOSH is run by a steering committee, which consists of, among others, Hugo Westerlund as PI and chairman, Ass. Prof. Constanze Leineweber (data manager), Dr. Linda L. Magnusson Hanson (SLOSH study director), and Dr. Martin Hyde (deputy head of unit). All these researchers have been involved in SLOSH since 2007 or earlier. Depending on different collaborations, research questions, etc., some scales were omitted, others were added and others were changed during the years. However, there are no dramatic changes regarding the content of the questionnaires. Overall, there is a fairly stable core set of items that covers the main research topics (outlined above), which are repeated in each of the waves.


The complexity of the database results in some inconsistencies, including different formats for the same data from different years, different original variable names, as well as different coding systems across years (e.g. for education and diagnoses). However, we are continuously working to build up a library of SAS scripts which merge original data and transform them into a standard form with standardised names according to our uniform naming convention. All variables are given short names which are evocative of their meaning in English (e.g. ‘workfast’ for an item asking ‘Do you have to work very fast?’) followed by an underscore and the number of the wave (thus ‘workfast_3’ denotes the responses to this item in the 2010 SLOSH survey). In addition to being convenient, this convention facilitates the transformation of data between ‘wide’ and ‘long’ formats.

Data quality


Internal attrition differs considerably between the two versions of the questionnaire, i.e. those in gainful employment and those who are not, but also between items. For many items internal attrition is between zero and 5 per cent, but for several items it is as high as nearly 70%. This seems however based on not applicability of those questions, thus participants didn’t answer and a no-alternative was not available. The questionnaires are scanned by SCB and consistency is checked ensuring good quality of the data. Register data are of high quality.


SLOSH was initiated by the Stress Research Institute in 2006. Prof. Hugo Westerlund took over as PI for SLOSH from Prof. emeritus Töres Theorell on 1 January 2012 after having been co-PI since the inception of the study. SLOSH is run by a steering committee which consists of among others Hugo Westerlund as PI and chairman, Ass.Prof. Constanze Leineweber (data manager), Dr. Linda L. Magnusson Hanson (SLOSH study director), and Dr. Martin Hyde (deputy head of unit). All these researchers have been involved in SLOSH since 2007 or earlier. Depending on different collaborations, research question etc., some scales were omitted, other were added and others were changed during the years. However, there are no dramatic changes regarding the content of the questionnaires. Overall there is a fairly stable core set of items that cover the main research topics (outlined above) which are repeated in each of the waves.


The complexity of the database results in some inconsistencies, including different formats for the same data from different years, different original variable names, as well as different coding systems across years (e.g. for education and diagnoses). However, we are continuously working to build up a library of SAS scripts which merge original data and transform them into a standard form with standardised names according to our uniform naming convention. All variables are given short names which are evocative of their meaning in English (e.g. ‘workfast’ for an item asking ‘Do you have to work very fast?’) followed by an underscore and the number of the wave (thus ‘workfast_3’ denotes the responses to this item in the 2010 SLOSH survey). In addition to being convenient, this convention facilitates the transformation of data between ‘wide’ and ‘long’ formats.


Applicability


With the exception of the Finish Public Sector study (FPSS), SLOSH is the only large-scale occupational cohort in the Nordic countries which follows a nationally representative sample of individuals with frequent repeat measures over an extended period of their working career. In contrast to FPSS, SLOSH includes also private and central government employees as well as self-employed, and has more frequent measurements. This makes the study uniquely suited for analyses of how the labour market as a whole impacts on health and well-being. In addition it enables analyses in groups which are rarely studied, like private sector employees. With its unique data SLOSH allows for a better under¬standing of how working life and well-being are linked, what the causal mechanisms might be, and how cumulative exposures to psychosocial factors are associated with disease risk. This makes it possible to study long-term outcomes such as drug therapy, hospitalisation, and cause-specific death. Furthermore, it allows researchers to study (and adjust for) a range of objectively measured exposures, risk factors and confounders, not the least in working life. By combining such registry data with self-reports, researchers can study the development of disease over long time periods and relate this development to work-related, socioeconomic, psychosocial and physical exposures, as well as to health behaviours. In addition, as the cohort is ageing, it will provide important data for the understanding of the timing of labour market exit and of how working life and retirement impact on health and well-being in early old age. In order to utilise and strengthen these advantages an effective strategy for data utilisation is needed. As with all cohort studies SLOSH is less well suited to study secular as opposed to intra-individual changes. Another weakness is that drop-out threatens the generalizability of the research. However this is not unique to SLOSH but common to all longitudinal studies.

Applicability


With the exception of the Finish Public Sector study (FPSS), SLOSH is the only large-scale occupational cohort in the Nordic countries which follows a nationally representative sample of individuals with frequent repeat measures over an extended period of their working career. In contrast to FPSS, SLOSH also includes private and central government employees, as well as self-employed, and has more frequent measurements. This makes the study uniquely suited for analyses of how the labour market as a whole impacts health and wellbeing. In addition, it enables analyses in groups which are rarely studied, like private sector employees. With its unique data, SLOSH allows for a better under¬standing of how working life and wellbeing are linked, what the causal mechanisms might be, and how cumulative exposures to psychosocial factors are associated with disease risk. This makes it possible to study long-term outcomes such as drug therapy, hospitalisation, and cause-specific death. Furthermore, it allows researchers to study (and adjust for) a range of objectively measured exposures, risk factors and confounders, not the least in working life. By combining such registry data with self-reports, researchers can study the development of disease over long time periods and relate this development to work-related, socioeconomic, psychosocial and physical exposures, as well as to health behaviours. In addition, as the cohort is ageing, it will provide important data for the understanding of the timing of labour market exit and of how working life and retirement impact health and wellbeing in early old age. In order to utilise and strengthen these advantages, an effective strategy for data utilisation is needed. As with all cohort studies, SLOSH is less well suited to study secular as opposed to intra-individual changes. Another weakness is that drop-out threatens the generalisability of the research. However, this is not unique to SLOSH, but common to all longitudinal studies.

Applicability


With the exception of the Finish Public Sector study (FPSS), SLOSH is the only large-scale occupational cohort in the Nordic countries which follows a nationally representative sample of individuals with frequent repeat measures over an extended period of their working career. In contrast to FPSS, SLOSH includes also private and central government employees as well as self-employed, and has more frequent measurements. This makes the study uniquely suited for analyses of how the labour market as a whole impacts on health and well-being. In addition it enables analyses in groups which are rarely studied, like private sector employees. With its unique data SLOSH allows for a better under¬standing of how working life and well-being are linked, what the causal mechanisms might be, and how cumulative exposures to psychosocial factors are associated with disease risk. This makes it possible to study long-term outcomes such as drug therapy, hospitalisation, and cause-specific death. Furthermore, it allows researchers to study (and adjust for) a range of objectively measured exposures, risk factors and confounders, not the least in working life. By combining such registry data with self-reports, researchers can study the development of disease over long time periods and relate this development to work-related, socioeconomic, psychosocial and physical exposures, as well as to health behaviours. In addition, as the cohort is ageing, it will provide important data for the understanding of the timing of labour market exit and of how working life and retirement impact on health and well-being in early old age. In order to utilise and strengthen these advantages an effective strategy for data utilisation is needed. As with all cohort studies SLOSH is less well suited to study secular as opposed to intra-individual changes. Another weakness is that drop-out threatens the generalizability of the research. However this is not unique to SLOSH but common to all longitudinal studies.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Kenneth Abrahamsson
  • (see Partners)