Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

COSM, Cohort Of Swedish Men
COSM, Cohort Of Swedish Men

Topic
Wellbeing
Health and Performance
Relevance for this Topic
Country Sweden
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Professor Alicja Wolk
Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, IMM
Nobels väg 13
171 77 Stockholm
Sweden
Phone: +46 8 524 861 70
Email: Alicja.Wolk(at)ki.se
Url: http://ki.se/ki/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=40981
http://ki.se/ki/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=40981&l=en

Timeliness, transparency

The first Lifestyle Questionnaire was carried out in 1997 and then again in 2009. From 2005 to 2008, DNA was collected through saliva samples and then in 2008, a health status, wellbeing, etc. questionnaire was completed. Beginning in 2010 and continuing until 2015, the first biomaterial collection is being carried out, which includes saliva, blood, urine, fat biopsies and faecal sample collections. The first publication regarding the Cohort of Swedish Men, COSM was published in 2002. Time between collection of data and publication of results varies due to kind of research design but takes approximately one year.

Type of data


Registry + Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Registries

Self-administered questionnaire


Cognitive tests Saliva, blood, urine, fat biopsies, faecal samples

Type of data


Registry + Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Telephone interview (CATI)

Registries

Self-administered questionnaire


Cognitive tests Saliva, blood, urine, fat biopsies, faecal samples


Access to data


On site access, as well as downloadable files, are available after agreement. Participants were informed that their data can be analysed abroad.

Conditions of access


The data can be available on request. Data can only be provided after ethical testing and approval by the Stockholm Ethical Review Board. Information of the study is available at the study website (above) or by contact with principal investigator. Institution’s agreement needed. There are scalable fees to access samples varying according to the investigator (e.g. national investigators, students, public/private institutions, Questionnaires can also be used by permission of principal investigator.


Up to 3 months


Aggregated tables or anonymised microdata are available depending on the type of collaboration.


SAS, STATA, Excel


Information is available in Swedish and in English. Most communication about the dataset as well as international publishing is in English. For further information, please contact principal investigator.

Access to data


On site access, as well as downloadable files, are available after agreement. Participants were informed that their data can be analysed abroad.

Conditions of access


The data can be available on request. Data can only be provided after ethical testing and approval by the Stockholm Ethical Review Board. Information of the study is available at the study website (above) or by contact with principal investigator. Institution’s agreement needed. There are scalable fees to access samples varying according to the investigator (e.g. national investigators, students, public/private institutions, Questionnaires can also be used by permission of principal investigator.


Up to 3 months


Aggregated tables or anonymised microdata are available depending on the type of collaboration.


SAS, STATA, Excel


Information is available in Swedish and in English. Most communication about the dataset as well as international publishing is in English. For further information, please contact principal investigator.


Coverage


Data was first collected through a lifestyle questionnaire in 1997 . The sample size was 48,850 men. A DNA collection was carried out from 2005 to 2008 and included 31,555 men (with an 80% response rate). A questionnaire about health status, wellbeing, etc. was conducted in 2008 and had a sample of 29,503 men (with a 78% response rate). The second lifestyle questionnaire was in 2009 and had a sample of 26,156 men (with a 90% response rate). Currently, a biomaterial collection is underway since 2010 and will be completed in 2015. This includes saliva, blood, and urine samples, fat biopsies and faecal samples. The COSM is a population-based cohort study established in central Sweden (Västmanland and Örebro counties) and includes about 50,000 men born 1918-1952. Baseline data in the COSM study were collected in 1997. The cohort includes questionnaire-based information about demographic factors and modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet, physical activity, smoking, weight, use of dietary supplements, some drugs “over counter”, and alcohol. Other self-reported information regarding wellbeing, different symptoms related to aging (not available in the Swedish health registries), social aspects, housing, longevity of parents etc., is available in the COSM.


1997


Born between 1918- and 1952, men, central Sweden (Västmanland and Örebro counties)


All men living in two counties in central Sweden in 1997 were invited to participate in the study.


Central Sweden


Born between 1918 and 1952, aged 45-79 years at baseline


The data is based on self-reported answers regarding present occupational status (full-time work, part-time work, house-wife, retired, disability, pension and unemployed). Information about work status is also obtained by linkage to Statistics Sweden (LISA register). The Cohort of 50,000 Swedish Men (COSM) is a multidisciplinary longitudinal project on the association of lifestyle and genetic factors with morbidity and mortality in middle-aged and elderly men. The COSM is a population-based cohort study established in central Sweden (Västmanland and Örebro counties) and includes about 50,000 men born 1918-1952. Baseline data in the COSM study were collected in 1997. The cohort includes questionnaire-based information about such modifiable lifestyle factors as diet, physical activity, smoking, weight, use of dietary supplements, some prescribed drugs, and alcohol. With the information from the cohort, we are able to investigate aging and specific major chronic diseases such as cancer (prostate, colon, bladder, kidney etc), cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataracts, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), obesity etc. Follow-up of the cohort is accomplished through annual matching with national and regional registers with high completeness of diagnoses and population registers at the Statistic Sweden. The COSM database will be extended with genetic information. This will facilitate studies of genetic susceptibility and of interplay/interactions between lifestyle and other factors and genes in the development of chronic diseases and ageing. Saliva samples for DNA extractions and genetic studies are available from 80% of the participants. Biological samples (blood, urine, fat biopsies, and fecal samples) and some clinical data (blood pressure, physical functionality tests, cognitive tests, etc.) have been collected from only 2,000 men. The collection is on-going and the plan is to get this biomaterial and clinical data from 5,000 men (random subsample from COSM).


Of totally over 100 peer-reviewed COSM publications, we present 20 selected articles. • Ahmed, et al. Coffee and risk of heart failure in men. Am Heart J 2009;158:667-72. • Andersson, et al. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in men. Brit J Urol 2004;94:327-31. • Discacciati, et al. BMI and risk of prostate cancer. Br J Cancer 2011;105:1061-8. • Kaluza, et al. Diet quality and mortality. Eur J Clin Nutr 2009;63:451-7. • Larsson, et al. Dairy and risk of stroke. Stroke. 2012;43:1775-80. • Larsson, et al. Diabetes and colorectal cancer incidence in men. Diabetes Care 2005;28:1805-7 • Larsson, et al. Diabetes mellitus, body size and bladder cancer. Eur J Cancer 2008;44:2655-60. • Larsson, et al. Long term aspirin use and colorectal cancer risk. Br J Cancer 2006;95:1277-9. • Larsson, et al. Red meat and risk of stroke in Swedish men. Am J Clin Nutr 2011;94:417-21. • Laven, et al. Birth weight and risk of lower urinary tract symptoms. J Urol 2008;179:1891-5. • Levitan, et al. Fish and incidence of heart failure. Eur Heart J 2009;30:1495-500. • Messerer, et al. Dietary supplement use and mortality in Swedish men. Br J Nutr 2007;3:1-6. • Orsini, et al. Association of physical activity with cancer incidence. Br J Cancer 2008;98:1864-9. • Orsini, et al. Physical activity and lower urinary tract symptoms. J Urol 2006;176:2546-50. • Orsini, et al. Physical activity and prostate cancer. Br J Cancer 2009;101:1932-8. • Oskarsson, et al. Vegetables, fruit and risk acute pancreatitis. Gut. 2012 June 27. [Epub ahead of print] • Sadr-Azodi , et al. Cigarette smoking, smoking cessation and acute pancreatitis. Gut 2012;61:262-7. • Stackelberg, et al. Obesity and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Br J Surg 2013;100:360-6. • Thomas, et al. Ascorbic acid supplements and kidney stone. JAMA Inter Med 2013;173:386-8. • Zheng Selin, et al. High-dose supplements of vitamins C and E and cataract. Am J Epid 2013;177:548-55.

Coverage


Data was first collected through a lifestyle questionnaire in 1997 . The sample size was 48,850 men. A DNA collection was carried out from 2005 to 2008 and included 31,555 men (with an 80% response rate). A questionnaire about health status, wellbeing, etc. was conducted in 2008 and had a sample of 29,503 men (with a 78% response rate). The second lifestyle questionnaire was in 2009 and had a sample of 26,156 men (with a 90% response rate). Currently, a biomaterial collection is underway since 2010 and will be completed in 2015. This includes saliva, blood, and urine samples, fat biopsies and faecal samples. The COSM is a population-based cohort study established in central Sweden (Västmanland and Örebro counties) and includes about 50,000 men born 1918-1952. Baseline data in the COSM study were collected in 1997. The cohort includes questionnaire-based information about demographic factors and modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet, physical activity, smoking, weight, use of dietary supplements, some drugs “over counter”, and alcohol. Other self-reported information regarding wellbeing, different symptoms related to aging (not available in the Swedish health registries), social aspects, housing, longevity of parents etc., is available in the COSM.


1997


Born between 1918 and 1952, men, central Sweden (Västmanland and Örebro counties)


All men living in two counties in central Sweden in 1997 were invited to participate in the study.


Central Sweden


Born between 1918- and 1952, aged 45-79 years at baseline


The data is based on self-reported answers regarding present occupational status (full-time work, part-time work, house-wife, retired, disability, pension and unemployed). Information about work status is also obtained by linkage to Statistics Sweden (LISA register). The Cohort of 50,000 Swedish Men (COSM) is a multidisciplinary longitudinal project on the association of lifestyle and genetic factors with morbidity and mortality in middle-aged and elderly men. The COSM is a population-based cohort study established in central Sweden (Västmanland and Örebro counties) and includes about 50,000 men born 1918-1952. Baseline data in the COSM study were collected in 1997. The cohort includes questionnaire-based information about such modifiable lifestyle factors as diet, physical activity, smoking, weight, use of dietary supplements, some prescribed drugs, and alcohol. With the information from the cohort, we are able to investigate aging and specific major chronic diseases such as cancer (prostate, colon, bladder, kidney etc), cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, cataracts, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), obesity etc. Follow-up of the cohort is accomplished through annual matching with national and regional registers with high completeness of diagnoses and population registers at the Statistic Sweden. The COSM database will be extended with genetic information. This will facilitate studies of genetic susceptibility and of interplay/interactions between lifestyle and other factors and genes in the development of chronic diseases and ageing. Saliva samples for DNA extractions and genetic studies are available from 80% of the participants. Biological samples (blood, urine, fat biopsies, and fecal samples) and some clinical data (blood pressure, physical functionality tests, cognitive tests, etc.) have been collected from only 2,000 men. The collection is on-going and the plan is to get this biomaterial and clinical data from 5,000 men (random subsample from COSM).


Of totally over 100 peer-reviewed COSM publications, we present 20 selected articles. • Ahmed, et al. Coffee and risk of heart failure in men. Am Heart J 2009;158:667-72. • Andersson, et al. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in men. Brit J Urol 2004;94:327-31. • Discacciati, et al. BMI and risk of prostate cancer. Br J Cancer 2011;105:1061-8. • Kaluza, et al. Diet quality and mortality. Eur J Clin Nutr 2009;63:451-7. • Larsson, et al. Dairy and risk of stroke. Stroke. 2012;43:1775-80. • Larsson, et al. Diabetes and colorectal cancer incidence in men. Diabetes Care 2005;28:1805-7 • Larsson, et al. Diabetes mellitus, body size and bladder cancer. Eur J Cancer 2008;44:2655-60. • Larsson, et al. Long term aspirin use and colorectal cancer risk. Br J Cancer 2006;95:1277-9. • Larsson, et al. Red meat and risk of stroke in Swedish men. Am J Clin Nutr 2011;94:417-21. • Laven, et al. Birth weight and risk of lower urinary tract symptoms. J Urol 2008;179:1891-5. • Levitan, et al. Fish and incidence of heart failure. Eur Heart J 2009;30:1495-500. • Messerer, et al. Dietary supplement use and mortality in Swedish men. Br J Nutr 2007;3:1-6. • Orsini, et al. Association of physical activity with cancer incidence. Br J Cancer 2008;98:1864-9. • Orsini, et al. Physical activity and lower urinary tract symptoms. J Urol 2006;176:2546-50. • Orsini, et al. Physical activity and prostate cancer. Br J Cancer 2009;101:1932-8. • Oskarsson, et al. Vegetables, fruit and risk acute pancreatitis. Gut. 2012 June 27. [Epub ahead of print] • Sadr-Azodi , et al. Cigarette smoking, smoking cessation and acute pancreatitis. Gut 2012;61:262-7. • Stackelberg, et al. Obesity and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Br J Surg 2013;100:360-6. • Thomas, et al. Ascorbic acid supplements and kidney stone. JAMA Inter Med 2013;173:386-8. • Zheng Selin, et al. High-dose supplements of vitamins C and E and cataract. Am J Epid 2013;177:548-55.


Linkage


The dataset is linked to Statistics Sweden where work occupation classification (SSYK) is used, which is based on ISCO-88.


There is an ID for these nearly 50,000 participants, which gives us a possibility to link to Swedish registers; we are updating their health status annually.

Linkage


The dataset is linked to Statistics Sweden where work occupation classification (SSYK) is used, which is based on ISCO-88.


There is an ID for these nearly 50,000 participants, which gives us a possibility to link to Swedish registers; we are updating their health status annually.


Data quality


Among the 50,000 participants, there is some missing information (partial lack of answers to some questions).


ICD codes of diseases are translated into the newest version ICD 10.


Yes

Data quality


Among the 50,000 participants, there is some missing information (partial lack of answers to some questions).


ICD codes of diseases are translated into the newest version ICD 10.


Yes


Applicability


Strengths: This dataset provides good opportunities to analyze relations between nutrition, modifiable life style patterns and socio-economic contexts, environments and working and living conditions of individuals over time. Primary data comprise both detailed descriptions of life style determinants and eating habits, clinical data, biological samples and social data, which open ups for cross-disciplinary research. Empirical evidence on risk factors for cancer and cardiovascular diseases generates a knowledge base for public health policies and for possible interventions. Weaknesses: Data from two counties in Sweden and not the entire population. Response rate, validity and quality of assessment being evaluated.

Applicability


Strengths: This dataset provides good opportunities to analyze relations between nutrition, modifiable life style patterns and socio-economic contexts, environments and working and living conditions of individuals over time. Primary data comprise both detailed descriptions of life style determinants and eating habits, clinical data, biological samples and social data, which open ups for cross-disciplinary research. Empirical evidence on risk factors for cancer and cardiovascular diseases generates a knowledge base for public health policies and for possible interventions. Weaknesses: Data from two counties in Sweden and not the entire population. Response rate, validity and quality of assessment being evaluated.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Kenneth Abrahamsson
  • (see Partners)