Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD)
Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD)

Topic
Intergenerational Relationships
Health and Performance
Social Systems and Welfare
Housing, Urban Development and Mobility
Relevance for this Topic
Country Sweden
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Tommy Bengtsson
Centre for Economic Demography
Schéelevägen 15B
22007 Lund
Sweden
Phone: +46 2200000
Email: Tommy.Bengtsson(at)ekh.lu.se
Url: http://www.ed.lu.se/EN/databases/default.asp
http://www.ed.lu.se/EN/databases/sdd.asp

Timeliness, transparency

It varies between different studies. Usually between 3 to 12 months.

Type of data


Registry

Type of Study


Population based longitudinal study with all persons born or migrated into the area 1813-2011

Data gathering method

Registries

Type of data


Registry

Type of Study


Population based longitudinal study with all persons born or migrated into the area 1813-2011

Data gathering method

Registries

Type of data


Registry

Type of Study


Population based longitudinal study with all persons born or migrated into the area 1813-2011

Data gathering method

Registries

Type of data


Registry

Type of Study


Population based longitudinal study with all persons born or migrated into the area 1813-2011

Data gathering method

Registries


Access to data


Open access for the period 1813-1910, data available only for scientific community after fulfilling legal requirement 1910-1968 Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The current version is the 3.1-version, and all comments and suggestions regarding the data and the use of the database are most welcome. In order to access data you need to fill in the Data Extraction Request Form and submit this. In return you will receive a link where you can choose to download the full dataset or choose which variables to download. The link opens a page which is open during 48 hours. The page contains the dataset in text-format, the variable list, and some general information concerning the use of the data. We also provide STATA do-files to facilitate the use of the SEDD-data; these are also accessible on this page (below). Terms and conditions for the use of the data can be found below. The reference to be used for the dataset is: Bengtsson, T., Dribe, M. and Svensson, P. (2012) The Scanian Economic Demographic Database, Version 3.1 (Machine-readable database). Lund: Lund University, Centre for Economic Demography. For further information: http://extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/ExtractionFileList.aspx

Conditions of access


See above (Ease)


Online considering that rules of access are respected and that the data is used for described purposes, anonymity respected and no dissemination to other scholars.


microdata


ASCII, STATA, SQL


Data is available in Swedish and English.

Access to data


Open access for the period 1813-1910, data available only for scientific community after fulfilling legal requirement 1910-1968 Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The current version is the 3.1-version, and all comments and suggestions regarding the data and the use of the database are most welcome. In order to access data you need to fill in the Data Extraction Request Form and submit this. In return you will receive a link where you can choose to download the full dataset or choose which variables to download. The link opens a page which is open during 48 hours. The page contains the dataset in text-format, the variable list, and some general information concerning the use of the data. We also provide STATA do-files to facilitate the use of the SEDD-data; these are also accessible on this page (below). Terms and conditions for the use of the data can be found below. The reference to be used for the dataset is: Bengtsson, T., Dribe, M. and Svensson, P. (2012) The Scanian Economic Demographic Database, Version 3.1 (Machine-readable database). Lund: Lund University, Centre for Economic Demography. For further information: http://extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/ExtractionFileList.aspx

Conditions of access


See above (Ease)


Online considering that rules of access are respected and that the data is used for described purposes, anonymity respected and no dissemination to other scholars.


microdata


ASCII, STATA, SQL


Data is available in Swedish and English.

Access to data


Open access for the period 1813-1910, data available only for scientific community after fulfilling legal requirement 1910-1968 Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The current version is the 3.1-version, and all comments and suggestions regarding the data and the use of the database are most welcome. In order to access data you need to fill in the Data Extraction Request Form and submit this. In return you will receive a link where you can choose to download the full dataset or choose which variables to download. The link opens a page which is open during 48 hours. The page contains the dataset in text-format, the variable list, and some general information concerning the use of the data. We also provide STATA do-files to facilitate the use of the SEDD-data; these are also accessible on this page (below). Terms and conditions for the use of the data can be found below. The reference to be used for the dataset is: Bengtsson, T., Dribe, M. and Svensson, P. (2012) The Scanian Economic Demographic Database, Version 3.1 (Machine-readable database). Lund: Lund University, Centre for Economic Demography. For further information: http://extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/ExtractionFileList.aspx

Conditions of access


See above (Ease)


Online considering that rules of access are respected and that the data is used for described purposes, anonymity respected and no dissemination to other scholars.


microdata


ASCII, STATA, SQL


Data is available in Swedish and English.

Access to data


Open access for the period 1813-1910, data available only for scientific community after fulfilling legal requirement 1910-1968 Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The current version is the 3.1-version, and all comments and suggestions regarding the data and the use of the database are most welcome. In order to access data you need to fill in the Data Extraction Request Form and submit this. In return you will receive a link where you can choose to download the full dataset or choose which variables to download. The link opens a page which is open during 48 hours. The page contains the dataset in text-format, the variable list, and some general information concerning the use of the data. We also provide STATA do-files to facilitate the use of the SEDD-data; these are also accessible on this page (below). Terms and conditions for the use of the data can be found below. The reference to be used for the dataset is: Bengtsson, T., Dribe, M. and Svensson, P. (2012) The Scanian Economic Demographic Database, Version 3.1 (Machine-readable database). Lund: Lund University, Centre for Economic Demography. For further information: http://extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/ExtractionFileList.aspx

Conditions of access


See above (Ease)


Online considering that rules of access are respected and that the data is used for described purposes, anonymity respected and no dissemination to other scholars.


microdata


ASCII, STATA, SQL


Data is available in Swedish and English.


Coverage


Availability of a unique data source: The Scanian Economic Demographic Database is the result of project collaborations between the CED and the Regional Archives in Lund. The co-operation has produced both an event database, in which all basic source material is registered, and an applied research database. The event database is accessible through the Regional Archives in Lund. The description that follows primarily relates to the research database. The database contains a variety of information on individual as well as household/family level and each individual in the database is under observation from birth/ in-migration and throughout the life span/ until an out-migration occurs. The fact that, and the way in which it also combines economic and demographic data in one data base, have made it unique by Swedish comparisons. 1813 to 1968, linked to central registers 1968-2011, sample size 104 000 individuals up to 1968, approximately 250,000 in total. Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The individuals are followed from birth or in-migration to death or out-migration, and the dataset contains demographic and socio-economic variables on household, family and individual level.


1813


Total population


The Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD) is based on family reconstitutions for nine rural parishes and one city (Helsingborg) in Scania, the southernmost county of Sweden, in which information in church records on births, deaths and marriages are linked together to form families. From the late 19th century onwards, one of the rural parishes was transformed from a minor rural village to a small industrial town (Kävlinge), while the others preserved their rural characters. Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895.


Five parishes in southern Sweden


All


Total population over a very long period of time allowing for full life-course and multi-generational studies. In addition to demographic variables, cause of death, health (from midwife reports and mustering), annual income (from 1903 onwards), height, occupations, etc are included. Migration is known, so exposure is known too. The geographical area covered is not large, which means that a large proportion of the individuals are only observed for a part of their lives. However, after 1968 individuals are followed wherever they live in Sweden.


See extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/.../SEDD_publications.pdf
(below only referee journal articles) Publications 2005-2012 based on data from the SEDD I. Articles in refereed journal (Web of Science) • Alter G, Dribe M & Van Poppel F (2007) Widowhood, family size, and post-reproductive mortality: A comparative analysis of three populations in nineteenth-century Europe. Demography 44:4, 785-806 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2009) Do conditions in early life affect old-age mortality directly and indirectly? Evidence form 19th-century rural Sweden. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1583-1590 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2011) Famines and mortality crises in 18th and 19th century southern Sweden. Genus 67:119-140. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2011) The late emergence of socioeconomic mortality differentials: A micro-level study of adult mortality in southern Sweden 1815-1968. Explorations in Economic History 48: 389-400. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2010) Quantifying the family clustering effect in infant and child mortality using median hazard ratios (MHR). The case of rural Sweden, 1766-1895. Historical Methods 43:1, 15-27 • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2006) Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: southern Sweden 1766-1865. Demography 43: 727-746 • Bengtsson, T & Gagnon, A (2011) “Revisiting mortality crises of the past: introduction”, Genus 67:1-8 • Bengtson T & Mineau G (2009) Early-life effects on socio-economic performance and mortality in later life: A full life-course approach using contemporary and historical sources. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1561-1564 • Bengtsson, T & van Poppel, F (2011) “Socioeconomic inequalities in death from past to present: An introduction”, Explorations in Economic History 48: 343-56. • Dribe, M, Van Bavel, J & Campbell C (2012) Social Mobility and Demographic Behaviour: Long Term Perspectives.” Demographic Research 26:173-190 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) People on the move. Determinants of servant migration in 19th century Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(1): 53-91 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Retirement as a strategy for land transmission: A micro study of Preindustrial rural Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(2): 165-191 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Finding the right partner. Rural homogamy in nineteenth-century Sweden. International Review of Social History 50(S): 149-177. • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Gender aspects of inheritance strategies and land transmission in rural Scania, Sweden, 1720-1840. History of the Family 10(3): 293-308 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Status homogamy in the preindustrial marriage market: Partner selection according to age, social origin, and place of birth in nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Journal of Family History 34:4, 387-406 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Partner choice and intergenerational occupational mobility: the case of nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Continuity and Change, 24:3, 487-512 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2010) Marriage choices and social reproduction. The interrelationship between partner selection and intergenerational socioeconomic mobility in 19th century Sweden. Demographic Research 22:347-382 • Dribe M, Lundh C & Nystedt P (2007) Widowhood strategies in preindustrial society. Journal of Interdisciplinary History 38:2, 207-232 • Dribe M, Olsson M & Svensson, P (2012). If the landlord so wanted: Family, farm production and land transfers in the manorial system.” Economic History Review 65:746-769. • Dribe M & Svensson P (2008) Social mobility in nineteenth century rural Sweden - A micro level analysis. Scandinavian Economic History Review 56:2, 122-141 • Dribe, M. & Van de Putte, B (2012) Marriage seasonality and the industrious revolution: Southern Sweden 1690-1895. Economic History Review 65: 1123-1146 • Olsson M (2007) Skatt på jord i Skåne. ALE 2007:3, 17-27 • Olsson M & Svensson P (2010) Agricultural growth and institutions: Sweden 1700- 1860. European Review of Economic History 14:2, 275-304. • Svensson P (2006) Peasants and Entrepreneurship in the Nineteenth-Century Agricultural Transformation of Sweden. Social Science History 30:3, 387-429 • Van de Putte B & Svensson P (2010) Measuring social structure in a rural context. Applying the SOCPO-scheme to Scania, Sweden (17th-20th centuries). Special Issue on Measuring Social Stratification in Historical Research: An Overview of Old Problems and New Methods in Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Nieuwste Geschiedenis 40:1-2, 249-293

Coverage


Availability of a unique data source: The Scanian Economic Demographic Database is the result of project collaborations between the CED and the Regional Archives in Lund. The co-operation has produced both an event database, in which all basic source material is registered, and an applied research database. The event database is accessible through the Regional Archives in Lund. The description that follows primarily relates to the research database. The database contains a variety of information on individual as well as household/family level and each individual in the database is under observation from birth/ in-migration and throughout the life span/ until an out-migration occurs. The fact that, and the way in which it also combines economic and demographic data in one data base, have made it unique by Swedish comparisons. 1813 to 1968, linked to central registers 1968-2011, sample size 104 000 individuals up to 1968, approximately 250,000 in total. Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The individuals are followed from birth or in-migration to death or out-migration, and the dataset contains demographic and socio-economic variables on household, family and individual level.


1813


Total population


The Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD) is based on family reconstitutions for nine rural parishes and one city (Helsingborg) in Scania, the southernmost county of Sweden, in which information in church records on births, deaths and marriages are linked together to form families. From the late 19th century onwards, one of the rural parishes was transformed from a minor rural village to a small industrial town (Kävlinge), while the others preserved their rural characters. Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895


Five parishes in southern Sweden


All


Total population over a very long period of time allowing for full life-course and multi-generational studies. In addition to demographic variables, cause of death, health (from midwife reports and mustering), annual income (from 1903 onwards), height, occupations, etc are included. Migration is known, so exposure is known too. The geographical area covered is not large, which means that a large proportion of the individuals are only observed for a part of their lives. However, after 1968 individuals are followed wherever they live in Sweden.


See extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/.../SEDD_publications.pdf
(below only referee journal articles) Publications 2005-2012 based on data from the SEDD I. Articles in refereed journal (Web of Science) • Alter G, Dribe M & Van Poppel F (2007) Widowhood, family size, and post-reproductive mortality: A comparative analysis of three populations in nineteenth-century Europe. Demography 44:4, 785-806 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2009) Do conditions in early life affect old-age mortality directly and indirectly? Evidence form 19th-century rural Sweden. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1583-1590 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2011) Famines and mortality crises in 18th and 19th century southern Sweden. Genus 67:119-140. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2011) The late emergence of socioeconomic mortality differentials: A micro-level study of adult mortality in southern Sweden 1815-1968. Explorations in Economic History 48: 389-400. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2010) Quantifying the family clustering effect in infant and child mortality using median hazard ratios (MHR). The case of rural Sweden, 1766-1895. Historical Methods 43:1, 15-27 • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2006) Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: southern Sweden 1766-1865. Demography 43: 727-746 • Bengtsson, T & Gagnon, A (2011) “Revisiting mortality crises of the past: introduction”, Genus 67:1-8 • Bengtson T & Mineau G (2009) Early-life effects on socio-economic performance and mortality in later life: A full life-course approach using contemporary and historical sources. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1561-1564 • Bengtsson, T & van Poppel, F (2011) “Socioeconomic inequalities in death from past to present: An introduction”, Explorations in Economic History 48: 343-56. • Dribe, M, Van Bavel, J & Campbell C (2012) Social Mobility and Demographic Behaviour: Long Term Perspectives.” Demographic Research 26:173-190 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) People on the move. Determinants of servant migration in 19th century Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(1): 53-91 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Retirement as a strategy for land transmission: A micro study of Preindustrial rural Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(2): 165-191 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Finding the right partner. Rural homogamy in nineteenth-century Sweden. International Review of Social History 50(S): 149-177. • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Gender aspects of inheritance strategies and land transmission in rural Scania, Sweden, 1720-1840. History of the Family 10(3): 293-308 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Status homogamy in the preindustrial marriage market: Partner selection according to age, social origin, and place of birth in nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Journal of Family History 34:4, 387-406 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Partner choice and intergenerational occupational mobility: the case of nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Continuity and Change, 24:3, 487-512 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2010) Marriage choices and social reproduction. The interrelationship between partner selection and intergenerational socioeconomic mobility in 19th century Sweden. Demographic Research 22:347-382 • Dribe M, Lundh C & Nystedt P (2007) Widowhood strategies in preindustrial society. Journal of Interdisciplinary History 38:2, 207-232 • Dribe M, Olsson M & Svensson, P (2012). If the landlord so wanted: Family, farm production and land transfers in the manorial system.” Economic History Review 65:746-769. • Dribe M & Svensson P (2008) Social mobility in nineteenth century rural Sweden - A micro level analysis. Scandinavian Economic History Review 56:2, 122-141 • Dribe, M. & Van de Putte, B (2012) Marriage seasonality and the industrious revolution: Southern Sweden 1690-1895. Economic History Review 65: 1123-1146 • Olsson M (2007) Skatt på jord i Skåne. ALE 2007:3, 17-27 • Olsson M & Svensson P (2010) Agricultural growth and institutions: Sweden 1700- 1860. European Review of Economic History 14:2, 275-304. • Svensson P (2006) Peasants and Entrepreneurship in the Nineteenth-Century Agricultural Transformation of Sweden. Social Science History 30:3, 387-429 • Van de Putte B & Svensson P (2010) Measuring social structure in a rural context. Applying the SOCPO-scheme to Scania, Sweden (17th-20th centuries). Special Issue on Measuring Social Stratification in Historical Research: An Overview of Old Problems and New Methods in Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Nieuwste Geschiedenis 40:1-2, 249-293 .

Coverage


Availability of a unique data source: The Scanian Economic Demographic Database is the result of project collaborations between the CED and the Regional Archives in Lund. The co-operation has produced both an event database, in which all basic source material is registered, and an applied research database. The event database is accessible through the Regional Archives in Lund. The description that follows primarily relates to the research database. The database contains a variety of information on individual as well as household/family level and each individual in the database is under observation from birth/ in-migration and throughout the life span/ until an out-migration occurs. The fact that, and the way in which it also combines economic and demographic data in one data base, have made it unique by Swedish comparisons. 1813 to 1968, linked to central registers 1968-2011, sample size 104 000 individuals up to 1968, approximately 250,000 in total. Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The individuals are followed from birth or in-migration to death or out-migration, and the dataset contains demographic and socio-economic variables on household, family and individual level.


1813


Total population


The Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD) is based on family reconstitutions for nine rural parishes and one city (Helsingborg) in Scania, the southernmost county of Sweden, in which information in church records on births, deaths and marriages are linked together to form families. From the late 19th century onwards, one of the rural parishes was transformed from a minor rural village to a small industrial town (Kävlinge), while the others preserved their rural characters. Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895.


Five parishes in southern Sweden


All


Total population over a very long period of time allowing for full life-course and multi-generational studies. In addition to demographic variables, cause of death, health (from midwife reports and mustering), annual income (from 1903 onwards), height, occupations, etc are included. Migration is known, so exposure is known too. The geographical area covered is not large, which means that a large proportion of the individuals are only observed for a part of their lives. However, after 1968 individuals are followed wherever they live in Sweden.


See extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/.../SEDD_publications.pdf
(below only referee journal articles) Publications 2005-2012 based on data from the SEDD I. Articles in refereed journal (Web of Science) • Alter G, Dribe M & Van Poppel F (2007) Widowhood, family size, and post-reproductive mortality: A comparative analysis of three populations in nineteenth-century Europe. Demography 44:4, 785-806 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2009) Do conditions in early life affect old-age mortality directly and indirectly? Evidence form 19th-century rural Sweden. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1583-1590 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2011) Famines and mortality crises in 18th and 19th century southern Sweden. Genus 67:119-140. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2011) The late emergence of socioeconomic mortality differentials: A micro-level study of adult mortality in southern Sweden 1815-1968. Explorations in Economic History 48: 389-400. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2010) Quantifying the family clustering effect in infant and child mortality using median hazard ratios (MHR). The case of rural Sweden, 1766-1895. Historical Methods 43:1, 15-27 • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2006) Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: southern Sweden 1766-1865. Demography 43: 727-746 • Bengtsson, T & Gagnon, A (2011) “Revisiting mortality crises of the past: introduction”, Genus 67:1-8 • Bengtson T & Mineau G (2009) Early-life effects on socio-economic performance and mortality in later life: A full life-course approach using contemporary and historical sources. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1561-1564 • Bengtsson, T & van Poppel, F (2011) “Socioeconomic inequalities in death from past to present: An introduction”, Explorations in Economic History 48: 343-56. • Dribe, M, Van Bavel, J & Campbell C (2012) Social Mobility and Demographic Behaviour: Long Term Perspectives.” Demographic Research 26:173-190 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) People on the move. Determinants of servant migration in 19th century Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(1): 53-91 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Retirement as a strategy for land transmission: A micro study of Preindustrial rural Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(2): 165-191 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Finding the right partner. Rural homogamy in nineteenth-century Sweden. International Review of Social History 50(S): 149-177. • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Gender aspects of inheritance strategies and land transmission in rural Scania, Sweden, 1720-1840. History of the Family 10(3): 293-308 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Status homogamy in the preindustrial marriage market: Partner selection according to age, social origin, and place of birth in nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Journal of Family History 34:4, 387-406 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Partner choice and intergenerational occupational mobility: the case of nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Continuity and Change, 24:3, 487-512 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2010) Marriage choices and social reproduction. The interrelationship between partner selection and intergenerational socioeconomic mobility in 19th century Sweden. Demographic Research 22:347-382 • Dribe M, Lundh C & Nystedt P (2007) Widowhood strategies in preindustrial society. Journal of Interdisciplinary History 38:2, 207-232 • Dribe M, Olsson M & Svensson, P (2012). If the landlord so wanted: Family, farm production and land transfers in the manorial system.” Economic History Review 65:746-769. • Dribe M & Svensson P (2008) Social mobility in nineteenth century rural Sweden - A micro level analysis. Scandinavian Economic History Review 56:2, 122-141 • Dribe, M. & Van de Putte, B (2012) Marriage seasonality and the industrious revolution: Southern Sweden 1690-1895. Economic History Review 65: 1123-1146 • Olsson M (2007) Skatt på jord i Skåne. ALE 2007:3, 17-27 • Olsson M & Svensson P (2010) Agricultural growth and institutions: Sweden 1700- 1860. European Review of Economic History 14:2, 275-304. • Svensson P (2006) Peasants and Entrepreneurship in the Nineteenth-Century Agricultural Transformation of Sweden. Social Science History 30:3, 387-429 • Van de Putte B & Svensson P (2010) Measuring social structure in a rural context. Applying the SOCPO-scheme to Scania, Sweden (17th-20th centuries). Special Issue on Measuring Social Stratification in Historical Research: An Overview of Old Problems and New Methods in Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Nieuwste Geschiedenis 40:1-2, 249-293

Coverage


Availability of a unique data source: The Scanian Economic Demographic Database is the result of project collaborations between the CED and the Regional Archives in Lund. The co-operation has produced both an event database, in which all basic source material is registered, and an applied research database. The event database is accessible through the Regional Archives in Lund. The description that follows primarily relates to the research database. The database contains a variety of information on individual as well as household/family level and each individual in the database is under observation from birth/ in-migration and throughout the life span/ until an out-migration occurs. The fact that, and the way in which it also combines economic and demographic data in one data base, have made it unique by Swedish comparisons. 1813 to 1968, linked to central registers 1968-2011, sample size 104 000 individuals up to 1968, approximately 250,000 in total. Data from the Scanian Economic Demographic Database is now publicly accessible. The dataset is a longitudinal economic and demographic dataset containing all individuals living in five parishes in southern Sweden for the period 1813 to 1910. The individuals are followed from birth or in-migration to death or out-migration, and the dataset contains demographic and socio-economic variables on household, family and individual level.


1813


Total population


The Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD) is based on family reconstitutions for nine rural parishes and one city (Helsingborg) in Scania, the southernmost county of Sweden, in which information in church records on births, deaths and marriages are linked together to form families. From the late 19th century onwards, one of the rural parishes was transformed from a minor rural village to a small industrial town (Kävlinge), while the others preserved their rural characters. Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895.


Five parishes in southern Sweden


All


Total population over a very long period of time allowing for full life-course and multi-generational studies. In addition to demographic variables, cause of death, health (from midwife reports and mustering), annual income (from 1903 onwards), height, occupations, etc are included. Migration is known, so exposure is known too. The geographical area covered is not large, which means that a large proportion of the individuals are only observed for a part of their lives. However, after 1968 individuals are followed wherever they live in Sweden.


See extract.sedd.ed.lu.se/.../SEDD_publications.pdf
(below only referee journal articles) Publications 2005-2012 based on data from the SEDD I. Articles in refereed journal (Web of Science) • Alter G, Dribe M & Van Poppel F (2007) Widowhood, family size, and post-reproductive mortality: A comparative analysis of three populations in nineteenth-century Europe. Demography 44:4, 785-806 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2009) Do conditions in early life affect old-age mortality directly and indirectly? Evidence form 19th-century rural Sweden. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1583-1590 • Bengtsson T & Broström G (2011) Famines and mortality crises in 18th and 19th century southern Sweden. Genus 67:119-140. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2011) The late emergence of socioeconomic mortality differentials: A micro-level study of adult mortality in southern Sweden 1815-1968. Explorations in Economic History 48: 389-400. • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2010) Quantifying the family clustering effect in infant and child mortality using median hazard ratios (MHR). The case of rural Sweden, 1766-1895. Historical Methods 43:1, 15-27 • Bengtsson T & Dribe M (2006) Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: southern Sweden 1766-1865. Demography 43: 727-746 • Bengtsson, T & Gagnon, A (2011) “Revisiting mortality crises of the past: introduction”, Genus 67:1-8 • Bengtson T & Mineau G (2009) Early-life effects on socio-economic performance and mortality in later life: A full life-course approach using contemporary and historical sources. Social Science & Medicine 68:9, 1561-1564 • Bengtsson, T & van Poppel, F (2011) “Socioeconomic inequalities in death from past to present: An introduction”, Explorations in Economic History 48: 343-56. • Dribe, M, Van Bavel, J & Campbell C (2012) Social Mobility and Demographic Behaviour: Long Term Perspectives.” Demographic Research 26:173-190 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) People on the move. Determinants of servant migration in 19th century Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(1): 53-91 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Retirement as a strategy for land transmission: A micro study of Preindustrial rural Sweden. Continuity and Change 20(2): 165-191 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Finding the right partner. Rural homogamy in nineteenth-century Sweden. International Review of Social History 50(S): 149-177. • Dribe M & Lundh C (2005) Gender aspects of inheritance strategies and land transmission in rural Scania, Sweden, 1720-1840. History of the Family 10(3): 293-308 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Status homogamy in the preindustrial marriage market: Partner selection according to age, social origin, and place of birth in nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Journal of Family History 34:4, 387-406 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2009) Partner choice and intergenerational occupational mobility: the case of nineteenth-century rural Sweden. Continuity and Change, 24:3, 487-512 • Dribe M & Lundh C (2010) Marriage choices and social reproduction. The interrelationship between partner selection and intergenerational socioeconomic mobility in 19th century Sweden. Demographic Research 22:347-382 • Dribe M, Lundh C & Nystedt P (2007) Widowhood strategies in preindustrial society. Journal of Interdisciplinary History 38:2, 207-232 • Dribe M, Olsson M & Svensson, P (2012). If the landlord so wanted: Family, farm production and land transfers in the manorial system.” Economic History Review 65:746-769. • Dribe M & Svensson P (2008) Social mobility in nineteenth century rural Sweden - A micro level analysis. Scandinavian Economic History Review 56:2, 122-141 • Dribe, M. & Van de Putte, B (2012) Marriage seasonality and the industrious revolution: Southern Sweden 1690-1895. Economic History Review 65: 1123-1146 • Olsson M (2007) Skatt på jord i Skåne. ALE 2007:3, 17-27 • Olsson M & Svensson P (2010) Agricultural growth and institutions: Sweden 1700- 1860. European Review of Economic History 14:2, 275-304. • Svensson P (2006) Peasants and Entrepreneurship in the Nineteenth-Century Agricultural Transformation of Sweden. Social Science History 30:3, 387-429 • Van de Putte B & Svensson P (2010) Measuring social structure in a rural context. Applying the SOCPO-scheme to Scania, Sweden (17th-20th centuries). Special Issue on Measuring Social Stratification in Historical Research: An Overview of Old Problems and New Methods in Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Nieuwste Geschiedenis 40:1-2, 249-293


Linkage


HISCO, ISCED


Individual id and person number (social security number) making it possible to link to national registers from 1968 onwards (which have been done).

Linkage


HISCO, ISCED


Individual ID and personal number (social security number) making it possible to link to national registers from 1968 onwards (which have been done).

Linkage


HISCO, ISCED


Individual ID and personal number (social security number) making it possible to link to national registers from 1968 onwards (which have been done).

Linkage


HISCO, ISCED


Individual ID and personal number (social security number) making it possible to link to national registers from 1968 onwards (which have been done).


Data quality


For a general description of the area, in terms of social, economic and demographic developments, see Bengtsson, T. & Dribe, M. (1997) Economy and Demography in Western Scania, Sweden, 1650-1900. EAP Working Series Paper No.10. Kyoto: International Research Center for Japanese Studies.


Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895. This data, together with local information on food prices and wages, has largely been used in developing methods for analysing environmental impacts on demographic outcomes and has formed the basis for the Swedish part of the Eurasian Project on Family and Population History, supported by Swedish, European, and Japanese funding (KA from website).


See above.

Data quality


For a general description of the area, in terms of social, economic and demographic developments, see Bengtsson, T. & Dribe, M. (1997) Economy and Demography in Western Scania, Sweden, 1650-1900. EAP Working Series Paper No.10. Kyoto: International Research Center for Japanese Studies.


Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895. This data, together with local information on food prices and wages, has largely been used in developing methods for analysing environmental impacts on demographic outcomes and has formed the basis for the Swedish part of the Eurasian Project on Family and Population History, supported by Swedish, European, and Japanese funding (KA from website).


See above.

Data quality


For a general description of the area, in terms of social, economic and demographic developments, see Bengtsson, T. & Dribe, M. (1997) Economy and Demography in Western Scania, Sweden, 1650-1900. EAP Working Series Paper No.10. Kyoto: International Research Center for Japanese Studies.


Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895. This data, together with local information on food prices and wages, has largely been used in developing methods for analysing environmental impacts on demographic outcomes and has formed the basis for the Swedish part of the Eurasian Project on Family and Population History, supported by Swedish, European, and Japanese funding (KA from website).


See above.

Data quality


For a general description of the area, in terms of social, economic and demographic developments, see Bengtsson, T. & Dribe, M. (1997) Economy and Demography in Western Scania, Sweden, 1650-1900. EAP Working Series Paper No.10. Kyoto: International Research Center for Japanese Studies.


Information about land ownership from the poll-tax registers has so far been linked to the families in five of the parishes in order to get better information about the socioeconomic position of the household. In addition, information from the catechetical examination registers on migration and household composition has been added for the same five parishes for the period 1829-1895. This data, together with local information on food prices and wages, has largely been used in developing methods for analysing environmental impacts on demographic outcomes and has formed the basis for the Swedish part of the Eurasian Project on Family and Population History, supported by Swedish, European, and Japanese funding (KA from website).


See above.


Applicability


Strengths: Data provides good opportunities to study demography, migration and aging in a historical perspective and the combination of economic and demographic is one of the strengths of the dataset. Weaknesses: The data set is composed by information from five parishes in south of Sweden.

Applicability


Strengths: Data provides good opportunities to study demography, migration and aging in a historical perspective and the combination of economic and demographic is one of the strengths of the dataset. Weaknesses: The data set is composed by information from five parishes in south of Sweden.

Applicability


Strengths: Data provides good opportunities to study demography, migration and aging in a historical perspective and the combination of economic and demographic is one of the strengths of the dataset. Weaknesses: The data set is composed by information from five parishes in south of Sweden.

Applicability


Strengths: Data provides good opportunities to study demography, migration and aging in a historical perspective and the combination of economic and demographic is one of the strengths of the dataset. Weaknesses: The data set is composed by information from five parishes in south of Sweden.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Kenneth Abrahamsson
  • (see Partners)