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More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study (UBCoS Multigen)
Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study (UBCoS Multigen)

Topic
Health and Performance
Relevance for this Topic
Country Sweden
URL
www.chess.su.se/ubcosmg
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Prof. Dr. Ilona Koupil (PI)
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University / Karolinska Institute
Sveavägenb 160
10691 Stockholm
Sweden
Phone: +468163952
Fax: +468162600
Email: ilona.koupil(at)chess.su.se
Url: www.chess.su.se/ubcosmg

Timeliness, transparency

The starting point for the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study (UBCoS Multigen) was a representative and well-defined cohort of 14,192 males and females born in Uppsala University Hospital from 1915-1929 (the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study or UBCoS: Leon 1998). The data collection started in the 1990s and first papers were published in 1998. In 2004, we were able for the first time to combine this original cohort with social and health data on all their descendants, obtained from routine registers (Koupil 2007). In 2007-2011, the dataset was further developed by additional data manually collected from church parish records, school archives and records from the 1930 Census and the period of follow-up was extended till the end of 2009/2010. The resulting multigenerational study spans five generations and comprises nearly 140,000 individuals on cohort members, descendants and partners (Koupil & Goodman 2011). For review of published papers until 2011, please see Koupil (2007) and Koupil & Goodman (2011).

Type of data


Registry

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Cohort study


The study includes several generations of descendants of the original cohort, i.e. families with children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren etc.

Data gathering method

Registries


Manually abstracted information from hospital records and other archives.


Access to data


Data can be analysed by CHESS. Guest researchers are welcomed.

Conditions of access


n.a.


Varies, requests are usually processed within a month.


The data set has subsets of anonymised micro data for specific analysis (no identifiers).


The data set is compatible to most applications as: ASCII, CSV, Excel, SAS, SPSS, STATA, Text, etc.


Data are available in Swedish and English.


Coverage


Data was first collected in the 1990s and the sample consisted of 14,192 males and females born in Uppsala University Hospital between 1915 and 1929. In 2004, this original cohort was combined with social and health data on all their descendants, obtained from routine registers (Koupil 2007). In 2007-2011, the data set was further developed by additional data manually collected from church parish records, school archives and records from the 1930 Census and the period of follow-up was extended till the end of 2009/2010. The resulting multigenerational study spans five generations and comprises nearly 140,000 individuals on cohort members, descendants and partners (Koupil & Goodman 2011).


See above. The main cohort was born between 1915 and 1929 and the data collection starts from before their birth (characteristics of parents and families)


Both sexes are included. The original cohort was born in Uppsala (1915-1929) and follow-up continues in the whole country (Sweden).


Starting with a birth cohort (all births in the Uppsala Academic Hospital) in 1915-1929 (including approximately 60% of all births during that period).


Original cohort born in Uppsala, follow-up continues in whole country (Sweden).


ages 0-96, currently follow-up till end 2011.


Population and regional representative


The cohort is used for a study of social, early life and intergenerational determinants of health and health inequality and is rich in data on social and health characteristics. The uniqueness of UBCoS Multigen, and the originality of the ongoing research, stems from this combination of routine registry data (available in Sweden since 1960) with manually collected social and health data stretching back to early 1900. In this way, it is possible to follow the first generation of men and women from before birth until age 81-95 years, as well as studying health and social mobility across up to six generations (Table 1 and Figure 1). The resulting multigenerational study comprises over 150,000 individuals, including cohort members, parents, descendants and partners (Koupil & Goodman 2011). This large sample size is combined with a low potential for selection bias, given that >98% of the original cohort members were traced to archive and/or register data. Cohort members also appear to be nationally representative in terms of key variables such as infant mortality and lifetime fertility (Goodman et al 2012), indicating the potential to generalize to individuals born in Sweden as a whole. Establishing external validity is also possible through comparisons with available total population data, using data currently accessible at CHESS (Social mobility database) and through the collaboration in the SIMSAM networks.


Selection: Koupil I. The Uppsala studies on developmental origins of health and disease. J Intern Med 2007;261:426-36. Koupil I, Goodman A. Health Equity: A lifecourse approach. Public Service Review: European Union 2011;22:382-3. Goodman A, Gisselmann M, Koupil I. Birth outcomes and early-life social characteristics predict unequal educational outcomes: consistency across Swedish cohorts born 1915-1929 and 1973-1980. Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies 2010;1):317-38. Goodman A, Koupil I. Social and biological determinants of reproductive success in Swedish males and females born 1915-1929. Evolution And Human Behavior 2009;30:329-41. Goodman A, Koupil I. The effect of school performance upon marriage and long-term reproductive success in 10,000 Swedish males and females born 1915-1929. Evolution And Human Behavior 2010;31:425-35. Goodman A, Koupil I, Lawson DW. Low fertility increases descendant socioeconomic position but reduces long-term fitness in a modern post-industrial society. Proc Biol Sci. 2012;279:4342-51. Please specify in no more than 2,000 characters with spaces (approx. 20 lines). The Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study: existing data The Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study (UBCoS Multigen: www.chess.su.se/ubcosmg ) started with a representative and well-defined cohort of 14,192 males and females born in Uppsala University Hospital from 1915-1929 (Leon 1998). In 2004, the cohort was combined with social and health data on all their descendants, obtained from routine registers (Koupil 2007). In 2007-2012, additional data was manually collected from church parish records, school archives, obstetric records and records from Census 1930, and the period of follow-up was extended till end of 2009/2010.


Linkage


Various classifications can be applied to classify occupational categories. Census and register data used the official Swedish classifications.


Possible through personal numbers to link with relevant background information from other registries or data sets.


Data quality


The quality of data is subject to the usual problems in completeness and quality of register data. Cleaning and consistency checks completed for a large number of commonly used variables. Triangulation often possible.


Changes in diagnostic criteria, completeness of registration etc. due to long period of follow-up.


E.g. consistent classification for occupational social class, definition of diagnostic categories over various ICD versions etc. developed by the team.


Applicability


Strengths: The uniqueness of UBCoS Multigen and the originality of the ongoing research stems from this combination of routine registry data (available in Sweden since 1960) with manually collected information stretching back to 1915. In this way, it is possible to follow the first generation of men and women from before birth till age 80-94 years. This makes UBCoS Multigen ideally suited for testing lifecourse models, particularly those connected to 'developmental origins of disease'. UBCoS provides good opportunities of interdisplinary and international collaborations. By the use of Swedish ID – personnumber – it is also possible to link to other datasets. Weaknesses: The data set concerns one city in Sweden, and allows to compare general results with similar registries from other cities.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Kenneth Abrahamsson
  • (see Partners)