Joint Programming Initiative

More Years, Better Lives

The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change

ETF - Cohort-sequential longitudinal databases Evaluation through follow-up
UGU - Kohortsekventiella longitudinella databaser Utvärdering genom uppföljning

Topic
Education and Learning
Relevance for this Topic
Country Sweden
URL
More Topics

Governance

Contact information

Jan-Eric Gustafsson, Department of Education and Special Education
Gothenburg University
Box 300
405 30 Gothenburg
Sweden
Phone: +46 31 786 0000
Fax: +46 31 786 2070
Email: michael.hansen(at)ped.gu.se
Url: www.ips.gu.se/forskning/forskningsprojekt/ugu/
www.ips.gu.se/.../

Timeliness, transparency

There are about 12 months between when data is collected and then published.

Type of data


Registry + Survey

Type of Study

Longitude survey: long-term study of the same sample

Longitude survey: long-term study of random or different samples

Cohort study

Data gathering method

Registries

Self-administered questionnaire


Access to data


Data are available only for the scientific community. A CD is provided after agreement.

Conditions of access


Nominal cost, review of research plan and relevance of data based on the plan, institutional agreements. Data can be deployed only in EU.


It takes between 1 and 4 weeks depending on the application’s scope.


Anonymised microdata


ASCII, SAS, SPSS, Text


Data are available in Swedish and English.


Coverage


Other sources can be added to ETF-data and therefore it is possible to research ETF-data from the start of a cohort to the current situation. The cohort born in 1948 from the 6th school class year, 1961, until 1968. The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1953 from the 6th school class year, 1974, until 1968 The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1967 from the 6th school class year, 1980, until they completed Upper Secondary School. The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1972 from the 3rd school class year, 1982, until they completed Upper Secondary School. The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1977 from the 3rd school class year, 1987, until they completed Upper Secondary School. The sample size consisted of 5,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1982 from the 3rd school class year, 1992, until they completed Upper Secondary School. The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1987 from the 3rd school class year, 1997, until they completed Upper Secondary School. The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1992 from the 3rd school class year, 2002, until they completed Upper Secondary School. The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The cohort born in 1998 from the 3rd school class year, 2008, and will go on until they complete Upper Secondary School. The sample size consisted of 10,000 pupils. The project comprises a nationally representative sample of pupils consisting of those born on the 5th, 15th or 25th of any month in 1948. The material covers some 12 000 pupils. The collection of the data was commenced when the majority of the pupils were in Grade VI (aged about 12), that is to say in 1960/61.


1961 for the cohort born in 1948.


No.


Nationally representative sample of 10 per cent (http://www.ips.gu.se/digitalAssets/824/824605_Dokument_UGUx.pdf)


The data set covers the entire country and is a representative sample of the age cohort. The project comprises a nationally representative sample of pupils consisting of those born on the 5th, 15th or 25th of any month in 1948. The material covers around 12 000 pupils.


From 10-13 years of age until they are no longer living


There are almost limitless possibilities providing the opportunity to add registry data from other sources. The project comprises a nationally representative sample of pupils consisting of those born on the 5th, 15th or 25th of any month in 1948. The material covers some 12 000 pupils. The collection of the data was commenced when the majority of the pupils were in Grade VI (aged about 12), that is to say in 1960/61. The data kept in the register may be said to be of two types: I) Background data were collected in the spring of 1961. On this occasion the Department of Pedagogics at University of Gothenburg collected particulars of the results of certain intelligence tests and of national standardised school tests, as well as replies to questionnaires about the pupils' leisure-time interests, future plans, and about the attitude of the pupils and their families to school and school work. At the same time Statistics Sweden (SCB) collected particulars on the father's/mother's occupation/education, the number of their brothers and sisters and the distance travelled by them between home and school. 2) Annual data ("school-year data") on the pupils' later schooling have been collected since 1960/61 by the SCB, up to the end of 1968/69. These data relate to place of residence, type of school system, grade, terminal marks, and certain optional subjects. This collection of annual data related to pupils at public elementary schools, experimental schools, comprehensive schools, intermediate schools, girls' schools, continuation schools, vocational schools and upper sec-ondary schools or corresponding schools (i.e. the general upper secondary schools according to the 1954 curriculum, technical and commercial upper secondary schools, upper secondary schools according to the 1965 curriculum, and integrated upper secondary schools).


Selection from the publication list of the latest two years. Complete list of all publications available at the link www.ips.gu.se/.../
Giota, J., & Emanuelsson, I. (in press). School policies in special education support issues in Grades 1-3 and 7-9 of Swedish compulsory school: a national representative study of principals’ judgements. Inclusive Education. Fredriksson, P., Öckert, B., & Oosterbeek H. (2013), Long-Term Effects of Class Size, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2013,128(1), 249-285. MacCabe, J. H., Wicks, S., Löfving, S., David, A. S., Berndtsson, Å., Gustafsson, J.-E., Allebeck, P., & Dalman, C. (2013). Decline in cognitive performance between age 13 and 18 and risk for psychosis in adulthood: a Swedish longitudinal cohort study. AMA Psychiatry. 2013;70(3):261-270. Askling, B. (2012). Expansion, självständighet, konkurrens. Vart är den högre utbildningen på väg? (Rapport). Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet. Askling, B. (2012).Integration and/or Diversification: The role of structure in meeting expectations on higher education. (Working paper HEIKwp 2012/04). Oslo: University of Oslo, Faculty of Educational Sciencies. Fredriksson, P., Oosterbeek H., & Öckert, B. (2012). Långsiktiga effekter av mindre klasser. Rapport 2012:5, Stockholm: IFAU. Thorsen, C., & Cliffordson, C. (2012). Teachers’ grade assignment and the predictive validity of criterion-referenced grades. Educational Research and Evaluation, 18, 2, 153-172. Cecilia Thorsen (2012): Dimensions of Norm-Referenced Compulsory School Grades and their Relative Importance for the Prediction of Upper Secondary School Grades, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, DOI:10.1080/00313831.2012.705322 Giota, J., & Emanu elsson, I. (2011). Specialpedagogiskt stöd, till vem och hur? Rektorers hantering av policyfrågor kring stödet i kommunala och fristående skolor. RIPS 2011:01: Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik. Gunnell, D., Löfving, S., Gustafsson, J.-E., & Allebeck, P. (2011). School performance and risk of suicide in early adulthood: Follow-up of two national cohorts of Swedish schoolchildren. Journal of Affective Disorders 131(1), 104-112. Klapp Lekholm, A. (2011). Effects of school characteristics on grades in compulsory school. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 55(6), 587-608. Rudolphi, F.. 2011. (2011). Class differences in educational and occupational aspirations and subsequent educational success among Swedish youth. I: Inequality in EducationalOutcomes. How Aspirations, Performance, and Choice Shape Careers in Sweden. Department of Sociology, Stockholm University and Swedish Institute for Social Research, Dissertation Series no. 86. Svensson, A. (Red.). (2011). Utvärdering genom uppföljning. Longitudinell individforskning under ett halvsekel. (Göteborgs universitet, 305). Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis.


Linkage


Use national standard harmonised with international types


There is an ID variable which makes it possible to link registry databases to Statistics Sweden and all official registers.


Data quality


High quality.


Please specify in no more than 1,200 characters with spaces (approx. twelve lines). Changes in the school system and in the community has led to some changes in the questionnaires. More information in the Anthology of the ETF-project: Svensson, A. (Red.). (2011). Utvärdering genom uppföljning. Longitudinell individforskning under ett halvsekel https://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/24366
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(in Swedish) www.ips.gu.se/forskning/forskningsprojekt/ugu/
(in Swedish) https://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/24366
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(Summery p.p. 267-277 in English) www.ips.gu.se/.../
(in English)


During the 50 years of existing, there have been developments with the sampling technique.


Applicability


Many have emphasized the value of the longitudinal cohort-sequential design, the accessibility of a rich and varied set of variables, as well as the opportunities to add data from other sources by means of the Swedish National Identification Number. For some studies, changes in the measurement instruments between cohorts can make comparisons more difficult. Another weakness is that it is has not been possible to gather data before the 6th school year for some cohorts. Up until recently very high participation about 80 per cent.


  • The information about this dataset was compiled by the author:
  • Kenneth Abrahamsson
  • (see Partners)